Vermont Humanities
Silhouette pen-and-ink drawing of the historical lesbian couple Charity and Sylvia

Comics and Queerness in Vermont and Beyond

From Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home to Charles Schulz’s Peanuts, comics have been a part of American culture since print first began. But comics are no longer relegated just to the newspaper. Vermont Cartoonist Laureate Tillie Walden presents a look at the intersection of indie comics with queer identity through her many graphic novels.

Black and white photo from Vermont Lesbian and Gay Pride march in 1983

Stories from the Vermont Queer Archives

Objects such as banners, T-shirts, and buttons in the Vermont Queer Archives at the Pride Center of Vermont reflect currents and changes in the lives of Vermont’s LGBTQ+ community. Meg Tamulonis, volunteer curator of the Archives, discusses how these objects mark various milestones, from Pride events to legal rulings.

Painting of Lucy Terry Prince

Lucy Terry Prince: Witness, Voice, and Poetics within the American Tradition

This exploration starts with a question: what is the arc from Lucy Terry Prince to the modern moment of the spoken word within poetry? Lucy’s poem “Bars Fight” survived for 100 years in oral tradition before appearing for the first time in 1854 in the Springfield Daily Republican.

Bill Mares and friend with beer

From Homebrew to the House of Fermentology

Bill Mares began making his own beer 45 years ago, when homebrewing was illegal and there were no microbreweries in America. Today there are over 7,000 such breweries nationwide, and Vermont has the highest percentage of breweries per capita in the country. In this presentation, Mares will discuss the American beer revolution, Vermont’s small but significant contribution, and his co-ownership of a brewery.

Image of painting of black soldier on horseback.

The Black Presence at the Battle of Bennington

It may come as a surprise that one of the 30 men killed at the Battle of Bennington was black. This illustrated lecture tells the story of Sipp Ives and other black patriots who played a role in the fighting and its aftermath.

Image of woman

Vermont Women and the Civil War

With nearly 35,000 of Vermont’s able-bodied men at war, the monumental task of keeping more than 30,000 farms in operation became very much a female enterprise during the Civil War.

Image of Vermont field in winter

1800 and Froze to Death: The Cold Year of 1816

1816 has long been known as the year without summer. This talk includes scores of anecdotes about the dark year of failed crops, scarce food, and religious revival.

Image of Vermont forest in winter

Murder in the Vermont Woods: A Story About Race, Class, and Gender in the 19th Century

Tells the story of an Indigenous man from southern New England who came to central Vermont during the late 19th century and was the victim of a murder.

Red Scare in the Green Mountains: Vermont in the McCarthy Era

Rick Winston explores some forgotten history as we see how a small, rural “rock-ribbed Republican” state with a historically libertarian streak handled the hysteria of the time.