Vermont Humanities

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Woman speaking with hand over heart beside statue

Using the humanities, we connect with people across Vermont to create just, vibrant, and resilient communities and to inspire a lifelong love of learning.

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Attend

Come enjoy 400+ humanities
events held across Vermont.

upcoming events

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Watch

Miss an event or discussion? Watch a recording on your
own time.

recorded events

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Listen

Dive into our two humanities podcasts to engage and learn about new perspectives.

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Book

Bring a speaker or event to your library, community, or school.

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Featured Events

Jason Reynolds with dreadlocks and a black jacket smiling with his head in with left hand
Live Event

Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You (SOLD OUT)

#1 New York Times bestselling author Jason Reynolds discusses his collaborative work on the book Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You, a reimagining of Ibram X. Kendi’s Stamped from the Beginning, “remixed” for a Young Adult audience.

Jason Reynolds with dreadlocks and a black jacket smiling with his head in with left hand
Digital Event

Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You

#1 New York Times bestselling author Jason Reynolds discusses his collaborative work on the book Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You, a reimagining of Ibram X. Kendi’s Stamped from the Beginning, “remixed” for a Young Adult audience.

Wall with poster that says "Post No Hate"
Live Event

Must Free Speech Endure Hate Speech?

The First Amendment prevents Congress from passing any laws that abridge the freedom of speech. But what does that actually mean? Professor Meg Mott considers the history of speech laws in the United States, how states and municipalities have tried to curb offensive speech, and how the Supreme Court has ruled on those efforts.

Maple Sugaring Tools hang on the wall of a sugar shack in New Hampshire
Live Event

Maple, Vermont’s Medicine of Connection

Author and theologian Damian Costello explores how the practice of maple sugaring in Vermont connects us to the land, our ancestors, and all that surrounds us. In conversation with the bestselling book “Braiding Sweetgrass,” he suggests that sugarmaking—which is informed by Indigenous wisdom—is a communal medicine of connection that teaches mutual reciprocity with the land.

A colorful graffito of Miles Davis playing trumpet with bright colors and shapes surrounding him
Live Event

The Electric Period of Miles Davis

The ever-changing music that Miles Davis recorded from 1969 to 1975 angered and bewildered many critics and fans, who accused the trumpeter of “selling out.” Jazz archivist and poet Reuben Jackson shares how recordings from Davis’ “Electric Period”—including 1974’s Get Up With It—prove otherwise. 

Jason Chin Stands in a white shirt and green pants wearing a backpack, staring out over the Grand Canyon
Live Event

Reflections on Writing and Illustration

Vermonter Jason Chin has written and illustrated many acclaimed children’s books, including Grand Canyon, Redwoods, and Your Place in the Universe. He received the 2022 Caldecott Medal for illustrating Watercress by Andrea Wang. In this presentation he describes his passion for nature, science, and art,  and discusses the impact of his work with young people. 

A postcard illustration of the Rudyard Kipling Estate in Brattleboro, VT at sunset
Live Event

Five Hard Questions about Kipling in Vermont

On his farm overlooking Brattleboro, Rudyard Kipling wrote the Jungle Book and many of his Just So Stories, and began to draft his great novel, Kim. Christopher Benfey, author If: The Untold Story of Kipling’s American Years, answers hard questions about Kipling’s time in this country, including whether he should be considered partly an American writer.

A red barn stands in the white snow in the winter of Vermont
Live Event

Vermonters and the Land

UVM professor Cheryl Morse—who studies how people perceive, co-produce, and experience rural places—reports on how different groups of Vermonters have engaged with land as landscape, place, and environment in recent years, and why these engagements matter in contemporary land debates.

A drawing of a woman standing on a pile of pharmaceutical pills
Live Event

What is Graphic Medicine?

Author and cartoonist Rachel Lindsay explores the themes of mental illness and psychopharmaceutical advertising, as chronicled in her book RX: A Graphic Memoir.

Vegetables and herbs hang to dry in front of a white wall
Live Event

Agrarian Storytelling & More

Members of the agrarian community share stories about food sovereignty, resilience, and being rooted in the land in this Fall Festival 2022 event hosted by Rural Vermont. Join us for an evening of storytelling and connection! Light snacks will be served.

Two men stand in front of a wooden frame in matching orange patterned shirts, holding woodwind instruments
Live Event

POSTPONED: Our Native Land

Father and son storytellers and musicians Joseph and Jesse Bruchac of the Nulhegan Abenaki Nation use traditional music, storytelling, and the Abenaki language to describe the continuing connection of their people to Ndakinna (our land.) They share greeting and friendship songs and tell stories that relate to the creation of the place now called Vermont. 

Detail of cover of The Most Costly Journey, showing a drawing of a Mexican man holding a paintbrush and a photo of his family
Live Event

“The Most Costly Journey” Latin American Migrant Workers, Health Care, and Collaborative Non-Fiction Comics

In this presentation, Andy Kolovos from the Vermont Folklife Center and Julia Grand Doucet from the Open Door Clinic provide an overview of the goals of the El Viaje Más Caro Project, the collaborative methods that define its approach, and insight into the lives and experiences of the workers whose labor supports the continued viability of dairy farming in Vermont.

See All Upcoming Events

We recently gave a $5000 project grant to the Center for Cartoon Studies in White River Junction to print and distribute a comic to schools and literacy organizations throughout Vermont.

How We Read, A Graphic Guide To Literacy will help kids experience the joy of reading and overcome the stigma of struggling to read.

Learn more about our Project Grants

Image courtesy Center for Cartoon Studies

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Our Programs

Vermont Humanities has developed a broad range of programs that serves Vermonters of all ages and backgrounds. In 2021, 31,365 people took part in 562 activities hosted by us or by our community partners.

Learn More about Our Programs

The Anne Commire Fund for Women in the Humanities supports projects that focus on women writers. Anne (at far left) is shown with the cast of her play “Melody Sisters” in 1984.

The fund was created through a legacy gift of $125,000 from Anne’s estate, one of the largest individual gifts ever made to Vermont Humanities.

Learn more about this gift

Support Our Work

By giving to Vermont Humanities, you support education for people of all ages through early literacy programs, Humanities Camps for middle-school children, and programs held in libraries, community centers, schools, and correctional facilities.

Learn More about Supporting Us

Vermont Humanities*** January 13, 2015