Vermont Humanities
Will Eberle wearing a brown straw hat with a black band, and a white shirt and blue dotted tie

Will Eberle

Will trains, consults, speaks, and informs policy on trauma, homelessness, mental health and addiction recovery, supported employment, equity, and educational access nationally. He is the Executive Director of Recovery Vermont/The Vermont Association for Mental Health and Addiction Recovery  – Vermont’s oldest and largest recovery organization.

Railroad bridge on stone pier across a snow Vermont road

A Bridge Across Our Two Vermonts

Vermont is not immune to issues like addiction, housing insecurity, and poverty. In recent years these overlapping problems have strained resources across the state, and can divide communities as they struggle to find solutions. Join Recovery Vermont Executive Director Will Eberle as he explores how to surmount the effect of bias and stigma so we can improve the health, happiness, and sense of belonging for all Vermonters.

Gary Miller with a red beard and glasses playing guitar and smiling

Gary Miller

Gary Miller’s short story collection “Museum of the Americas” was a finalist for the 2015 Vermont Book Award. Gary has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize in fiction, and has been named a finalist in the James Jones Novel Fellowship Contest.

Three people writing at a white table in a room with brown walls

Writers for Recovery Workshop

In this engaging participatory workshop, you’ll hear the powerful stories of people in recovery. You’ll learn how and why the writing techniques used in Writers for Recovery enable people to ease their emotional pain, reduce their feelings of shame, and move forward toward recovery. You’ll even develop new tools for managing stress and difficult situations in your own life. 

Bess O'Brien with sandy blonde hair wearing a gray jacket focusing a video camera with the woods as a backdrop

Bess O’Brien

Bess O’Brien is the director and producer of a number of award-winning films including her latest documentary “Just Getting By” which is focused on Vermonters struggling with food and housing insecurity.

Extreme Survival book cover, with a snow-covered mountain in the background

Extreme Survival: Lessons from Those Who Triumphed Against All Odds

We have all heard amazing stories of survival that rendered us awestruck. But too often, we don’t realize the wealth of information we can learn from people who make it to the other side of life’s most daunting challenges. In this talk, New York Times bestselling author Michael J. Tougias chronicles harrowing survival stories and then discusses lessons to learn from these experience.

Tillie Walden wearing a black sweatshirt and with medium-length reddish blonde hair and wire framed glasses

Tillie Walden

Tillie Walden won the 2018 Eisner Award for Best Reality-Based Work for her graphic novel Spinning, making her one of the youngest Eisner Award winners ever. She was named Vermont’s Cartoonist Laureate for the years 2023 to 2026.

Silhouette pen-and-ink drawing of the historical lesbian couple Charity and Sylvia

Comics and Queerness in Vermont and Beyond

From Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home to Charles Schulz’s Peanuts, comics have been a part of American culture since print first began. But comics are no longer relegated just to the newspaper. Vermont Cartoonist Laureate Tillie Walden presents a look at the intersection of indie comics with queer identity through her many graphic novels.

Comics in World History and Cultures in text over a collage of comic book illustrations

Comics in World History and Cultures

Join award-winning cartoonist and educator Marek Bennett as we explore and explain comics from many corners of the globe — with special attention to how people use sequential visual narratives to share ideas, information, and meaning.

Black and white photo of masks in a shop window along a cobblestone street

Dazed, Seduced and Transfixed: The Monster Through Time, In Literature and In Our Lives

Our culture is filled with manifestations of the monster. These figures span genres, from mythology to oral tradition to poetry. It is a part of our human cartography. Alongside this legacy, moments of history have sometimes raised the question: “Who is the monster?” The creatures we have created on screen and on the page, or the reflection staring back at us?