Vermont Humanities
Extreme Survival book cover, with a snow-covered mountain in the background

Extreme Survival: Lessons from Those Who Triumphed Against All Odds

We have all heard amazing stories of survival that rendered us awestruck. But too often, we don’t realize the wealth of information we can learn from people who make it to the other side of life’s most daunting challenges. In this talk, New York Times bestselling author Michael J. Tougias chronicles harrowing survival stories and then discusses lessons to learn from these experience.

Tillie Walden wearing a black sweatshirt and with medium-length reddish blonde hair and wire framed glasses

Tillie Walden

Tillie Walden won the 2018 Eisner Award for Best Reality-Based Work for her graphic novel Spinning, making her one of the youngest Eisner Award winners ever. She was named Vermont’s Cartoonist Laureate for the years 2023 to 2026.

Silhouette pen-and-ink drawing of the historical lesbian couple Charity and Sylvia

Comics and Queerness in Vermont and Beyond

From Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home to Charles Schulz’s Peanuts, comics have been a part of American culture since print first began. But comics are no longer relegated just to the newspaper. Vermont Cartoonist Laureate Tillie Walden presents a look at the intersection of indie comics with queer identity through her many graphic novels.

Comics in World History and Cultures in text over a collage of comic book illustrations

Comics in World History and Cultures

Join award-winning cartoonist and educator Marek Bennett as we explore and explain comics from many corners of the globe — with special attention to how people use sequential visual narratives to share ideas, information, and meaning.

Black and white photo of masks in a shop window along a cobblestone street

Dazed, Seduced and Transfixed: The Monster Through Time, In Literature and In Our Lives

Our culture is filled with manifestations of the monster. These figures span genres, from mythology to oral tradition to poetry. It is a part of our human cartography. Alongside this legacy, moments of history have sometimes raised the question: “Who is the monster?” The creatures we have created on screen and on the page, or the reflection staring back at us?

Image of Meg Tamulonis wearing a red sweater with her hands folded in front of her chest

Meg Tamulonis

Meg is the volunteer curator of the Vermont Queer Archives with the Pride Center of Vermont in Burlington.  Her day job is Manager of Collections and Exhibitions at the Fleming Museum of Art at the University of Vermont.

Black and white photo from Vermont Lesbian and Gay Pride march in 1983

Stories from the Vermont Queer Archives

Objects such as banners, T-shirts, and buttons in the Vermont Queer Archives at the Pride Center of Vermont reflect currents and changes in the lives of Vermont’s LGBTQ+ community. Meg Tamulonis, volunteer curator of the Archives, discusses how these objects mark various milestones, from Pride events to legal rulings.

Andy Kolovos wearing a green T-shirt and smiling

Andy Kolovos

Andy Kolovos is the Associate Director and Archivist of the Vermont Folklife Center. He has conducted ethnographic and oral history research in Vermont since 2002, and has a deep interest in the use of comics as a medium for collaborative documentary work.

“The Most Costly Journey” Latin American Migrant Workers, Health Care, and Collaborative Non-Fiction Comics

Andy Kolovos from the Vermont Folklife Center and/or Julia Grand Doucet from the Open Door Clinic provide an overview of the goals of the El Viaje Más Caro Project, the collaborative methods that define its approach, and insight into the lives and experiences of the workers whose labor supports the continued viability of dairy farming in Vermont.