Vermont Humanities

Vermont Reads 2022 Events

Black and white cartoon drawing of a farmer in rubber boots with cows in a Vermont barn yard
Vermont Reads

To support Vermont Reads 2022 we’ll host a series of monthly public events starting in July, featuring in-person and online discussions and presentations around the book’s themes, including up to a dozen Fall Festival events in October and regular First Wednesdays lectures on these topics through May 2023.

Upcoming Vermont Reads Events

Black and white cartoon drawing of a farmer in rubber boots with cows in a Vermont barn yard
Live Event

Honoring the Journey: A Celebration of Migrant Workers in Addison County

Join us for a festival on the New Haven Village Green in honor of the contributions of the migrant workers in our community. Our celebration will include food and music from Mexico and Central America, bilingual storytime, booths from local organizations, children’s crafts, first-hand sharing from migrant workers, all culminating an a community soccer game.

A red barn stands in the white snow in the winter of Vermont
Live Event

Vermonters and the Land

UVM professor Cheryl Morse—who studies how people perceive, co-produce, and experience rural places—reports on how different groups of Vermonters have engaged with land as landscape, place, and environment in recent years, and why these engagements matter in contemporary land debates.

A drawing of a woman standing on a pile of pharmaceutical pills
Live Event

What is Graphic Medicine?

Author and cartoonist Rachel Lindsay explores the themes of mental illness and psychopharmaceutical advertising, as chronicled in her book RX: A Graphic Memoir.

Vegetables and herbs hang to dry in front of a white wall
Live Event

Agrarian Storytelling & More

Members of the agrarian community share stories about food sovereignty, resilience, and being rooted in the land in this Fall Festival 2022 event hosted by Rural Vermont. Join us for an evening of storytelling and connection! Light snacks will be served.

A drone sits in a hangar looking out on a desert and mountain as a man in a jumpsuit walks towards it.
Hybrid Event

Dirty Work with Author Eyal Press

Journalist Eyal Press discusses his reporting for his award-winning book “Dirty Work: Essential Jobs and the Hidden Toll of Inequality in America” which examines the morally troubling jobs that society tacitly condones, and the hidden class of workers who do them.

Three people sitting on a wooden platform, one on left playing a hand drum while the two on right sing
Live Event

Garifuna Collective: Keeping Culture Alive

In honor of Indigenous Peoples Day (October 10), the Chandler Center for the Arts hosts a conversation with members of the internationally renowned Garifuna Collective. They’ll relate stories about their ancestors and the displacement of the Garifuna people to Honduras and Belize.

Illustration of a woman walking across a farm wearing a winter coat.
Live Event

Non-Fiction Comics Festival

From science to politics, history to health care, cartooning has exploded as a legitimate medium for exploring non-fiction topics and the textures of lived experience. The first ever Non-Fiction Comics Festival will feature panel discussions, workshops, and exhibits by cartoonists who create non-fiction and autobiographical work.

Three young Mexican brothers wearing white and black T-shirts in a white room, each holding a box on the same fiddle
Live Event

The Villalobos Brothers in Concert

Born in Xalapa, Mexico, The Villalobos Brothers have been acclaimed as one of today’s leading contemporary Mexican ensembles. Their original compositions and arrangements masterfully fuse and celebrate the richness of Mexican folk music with the intricate harmonies of jazz and classical music.

Illustration of people gathered around a document to discuss civics
Live Event

Freedom and Unity Launch Party

Hosted by the Center for Cartoon Studies, this lively presentation about the making of Freedom and Unity, A Graphic Guide to Vermont Democracy will feature the cartoonists and scholars that helped create a comic book about the past, present, and potential of democracy and civics in Vermont.

Two elderly men sit in front of a white door on a red brick house while a dog watches through the window
Live Event

Migration Pathways: Stories of Yesterday and Today

Andrew Ingall, creator of the project “Warlé, Yesterday, and Today,” leads a participatory workshop inspired by the lives and legacy of Warren Kronemeyer and Leon Ingall, a Vermont couple who were entrepreneurs and civic leaders in Townshend, VT during the 1980 and 1990s.

Two Cosplayers at the New York ComicCon in 2016 are dressed as Mr. Freeze and Black Panther and stand facing each other against a gray wall
Live Event

Diasporic Immigrant Superheroes: From Foreign to BIPOC & LGBTQ+

Middlebury College professor Enrique García reviews the American superhero genre and how it has served as a tool to disseminate utopian ideas about immigration and the American Dream. While discussing characters such as Superman, Wonder Woman, Black Panther, and La Borinqueña, García reflects on comic artists’ struggles to overcome imperial ideas of white supremacy, heteronormativity, and American exceptionalism.

A drawing of a Civil War soldier standing on a cold field in black and white
Live Event

Drawing Community: Creating Comics from Shared Stories

Using examples from his work with the Vermont Reads 2022 book The Most Costly Journey (El Viaje Más Caro) and his Civil War Diary of Freeman Colby series, cartoonist Marek Bennett explores how the act of cartooning can help us forge connections, build empathy, and challenge set definitions of identity and belonging. 

Vermont Humanities*** April 5, 2022