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Humanities for Everyone

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Dudley H. Davis Center

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590 Main Street
Burlington, VT 05401 United States
(802) 656-4636

November 2016

Ears to the Rail: Ulysses S. Grant and the Art of Listening

November 5, 2016
9:30 am – 10:45 am
Image of Ulysses S. Grant

Professor Elizabeth Samet will focus on the career of Grant as an illustration of the importance of listening and patient observation to the leadership of enterprises large and small. The lecture will also address the potential of literature to help cultivate such leadership. (Registration required.) Read More »

Confucius Says, “Lead Them with Virtue”

November 5, 2016
11:00 am – 12:15 pm
Image of Confucius statue

Led by: Daniel Gardner, Dwight W. Morrow Professor of History, Smith College. In premodern China, Japan, and Korea, Confucian teachings were akin to state orthodoxy. This orthodoxy held that the ruler and his officials were to govern the people paternalistically—not democratically, not representatively. Their right to rule was grounded in their cultivated goodness and wisdom, in their capacity to give the people moral guidance. (Registration required.) Read More »

Military Leadership and the Cost of War: From the Iliad to the Present Day

November 5, 2016
11:00 am – 12:15 pm
Image of marine leader speaker to marines

The questions at the heart of the Iliad concern the challenges of military leadership. Caroline Alexander, translator of the critically acclaimed translation of the Iliad, and Elizabeth D. Samet, editor of Leadership: Essential Writings by Our Greatest Thinkers, will explore together the challenges of military leadership and the costs of war. (Registration required) Read More »

The Life of Moses

November 5, 2016
11:00 am – 12:15 pm
Image of painting of Israelites crossing the Red Sea

Led by: Susan Ackerman, Preston H. Kelsey Professorship in Religion, Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies and Jewish Studies, Dartmouth College. The life story of Moses, the leader who brought the Israelites out of bondage in Egypt, is hardly the sort of tale one would expect of a religious hero. He was ultimately a remarkably successful leader, and yet his was, in the end, a tragic story. This lecture explores this curious life story. (Registration required.) Read More »

Indira Gandhi and Benazir Bhutto: Women as Leaders in India and Pakistan

November 5, 2016
11:00 am – 12:15 pm
Image of Benazir Bhutto from 1988

Led by: Abigail McGowan, Associate Professor of History, University of Vermont. Focusing on the examples of Indira Gandhi (PM of India from 1966-77 and 1980-84) and Benazir Bhutto (PM of Pakistan from 1988-90 and 1993-96), we will explore both why countries in the region embraced women in powerful political roles so early, and how women’s leadership on the national stage did and did not reshape political life. (Registration required.) Read More »

Centuries of Struggles: Women Who Led the Way into American Politics

November 5, 2016
11:00 am – 12:15 pm
Image of women registering to vote

Led by: Melanie Gustafson, Associate Professor of History, University of Vermont. It took women almost a century to win the vote, and the centennial of the Nineteenth Amendment will be celebrated in 2020. This session will highlight some of the exciting moments of women's political struggles and explore the lives of the women leaders who brought about the suffrage victory. (Registration required.) Read More »

Thinking with Shakespeare; or, What Can We Learn from Him

November 5, 2016
1:15 pm – 2:30 pm
Image of painting of Henry V

Led by: David Scott Kastan, George M. Bodman Professor of English, Yale University. Consultants and motivational speakers have often parlayed our desire for effective leadership with our faith in Shakespeare, developing courses in “Leadership Lessons Taught by Shakespeare.” By actually reading Shakespeare, however, rather than merely cherry-picking phrases, we discover that leadership turns out to be something rare, necessary, often painful, and almost inevitably compromised and compromising. (Registration required.) Read More »

George C. Marshall: Soldier-Statesman of the American Century

November 5, 2016
2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Image of George C. Marshall

Led by: Mark A. Stoler, Professor Emeritus of History, University of Vermont. Marshall was the architect of both the Allied World War II victory and key U.S. Cold War policies, most notably the European Recovery Program, known as “the Marshall Plan,” for which he received the Nobel Peace Prize. (Registration required.) Read More »

Responding to Crises in Leadership: Plato, Seneca, and Beyond

November 5, 2016
2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Images of busts of philosophers

Led by: M. D. Usher, Professor of Classics, University of Vermont. Two prolific ancient philosophers (one Greek, one Roman). Two different responses to two different, but equally urgent crises in leadership. What did Plato and Seneca face? What were their responses? And what might we learn about leadership from classical philosophy? (Registration required.) Read More »

Power Plays

November 5, 2016
2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Image of painting of Cleopatra

Led by: David Scott Kastan, George M. Bodman Professor of English, Yale University. Shakespeare’s plays offer us ways to think about many of our most urgent concerns, including the related issues of power, authority, leadership, and sovereignty. They provide images of various kinds of leaders, fully imagined and differently mixing strengths and weaknesses — including strengths that are identical with their weaknesses. (Registration required.) Read More »

Word Warriors: Reflections on Leadership & Governance in American Indian Tribal Nations

November 5, 2016
2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Image of Native American man with traditional artwork

Led by: N. Bruce Duthu, Samson Occom Professor of Native American Studies, Dartmouth College. This presentation offers a brief overview of the various forms of leadership in contemporary tribal nations, including elected or appointed political leaders, traditional leaders, and American Indian intellectual leaders. (Registration required) Read More »

Women and Leadership in the Middle Ages

November 5, 2016
2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Image of Joan of Arc on horseback

Led by George Dameron, Professor of History, St. Michael's College. Negative stereotypes regarding women and femininity were prevalent in the European Middle Ages, especially among male intellectuals, leaders, and writers. Nevertheless, many women were able to overcome those obstacles and assume influential positions of leadership in their society. (Registration required.) Read More »

The Endurance: Shackleton’s Legendary Antarctic Expedition

November 5, 2016
4:15 pm – 5:30 pm
Image of Ernest Shackleton

In 1914, polar explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton left England for the Antarctic with a crew of 27 on his ship Endurance. When it was crushed by sea ice, they became castaways in the harshest environment on Earth. A century later, author Caroline Alexander shares a thrilling saga of stoic courage that also serves as a master class in leadership. (Registration required.) Read More »

November 2017

Is the Economic Past Prologue: Will the Industrial Revolution’s Economic Growth Continue?

November 17, 2017
4:00 pm
Image of painting of two trains coming into a station

For 97% of recorded history, the world economy remained in a largely stationary state—until the Industrial Revolution, which brought significant economic growth. Is that growth sustainable? Professor Mokyr will answer that question. (Registration required.) Read More »

Vermont Gun Makers and the Precision Technology that Changed America

November 17, 2017
4:00 pm
Image of Civil War soldiers with rifles

In the early 1850s, gun makers of the Connecticut River Valley were the “high-tech” workers of their day, developing methods and tools that would help the Union win the Civil War, and also make that war so deadly. Those same tools and techniques led to mass-production and the consumer culture we know today. (Registration required.) Read More »

Dystopian Fiction and the Future

November 17, 2017
4:00 pm
Image of security camera

Dystopian novels like 1984, The Handmaid’s Tale, and The Circle never predict the future perfectly. However, these stories reveal possible futures that might unfold from the present. This session will examine dystopian fiction to explore how technology changes what it means to be human, including, perhaps changing the way we love. (Registration required.) Read More »

Arts + Crafts Movement: The Arts Challenge the Machine

November 17, 2017
4:00 pm
Image of craftsman at workbench

In the 1850s, England was the globe’s technological leader, and many people celebrated its new manufactured goods. However, a small but influential group of architects and artisans led by William Morris was appalled by the goods’ poor designs and inferior materials, and advocated for a return to well-designed objects, crafted by hand, and made of the finest materials. (Registration required.) Read More »

Will Technology Save Us?

November 17, 2017
7:30 pm – 9:00 pm
Image of old steam train

Will technological progress continue to drive progress and economic prosperity or are our best innovations behind us? Northwestern University economics professors Robert Gordon and Joel Mokyr will present profoundly different outlooks for America’s economic future and the role of technological innovation in that future. (Registration required.) Read More »

Sociable Solitude

November 18, 2017
9:00 am – 10:15 am
Image of man in cafe with laptop

Sociable solitude—whether we find it in being alone with a book, or alone in prayer, alone with our phones—is an ancient human experience and pervasive element of contemporary life. Amy Hungerford, literature professor and Dean of Humanities at Yale, explores the history, practice, and meaning of sociable solitude in the internet age. (Registration required.) Read More »

The Pace of Innovation and Other Drags on Future Economic Growth

November 18, 2017
10:35 am
Image of freeway cloverleaf

The debate about future U.S. economic growth has been framed as a conflict between techno-optimists and techno-pessimists. But there are other powerful forces in addition to the pace of innovation that are pushing downward on economic growth. Professor Gordon will outline some of the major forces and consider what they mean for future economic growth. (Registration required.) Read More »

Technology and Social Change in Pre-Modern East Asian Civilization

November 18, 2017
10:35 am
Image of rice farmer in Asia

This session will explore technological developments from the early history of China (such as iron weapons, rice field farming, and wood block printing) and examine their impact, both positive and negative, intended and unforeseen, on the East Asian world before the modern era. (Registration required.) Read More »

Discussion and Reflection

November 18, 2017
10:35 am
Image of Suzanne Brown leading a discussion

Using the advance readings as a starting point, this session, facilitated by VHC discussion leader extraordinaire Suzanne Brown, offers attendees an opportunity to reflect and discuss the themes and connections they have made thus far in the conference. (Registration required.) Read More »

Shaping and Reshaping Architecture

November 18, 2017
10:35 am
Image of modern building

From ancient temples to mega-skyscrapers, advances in technology have expanded and tested the potentials of architecture, serving the imagination and aspirations of their times, but also challenging society to respond to altered standards. (Registration required.) Read More »

Optimizing Data

November 18, 2017
10:35 am
Image of hands holding smartphones

Data is turned out in unimaginable quantities day and night by our myriad computers and smart devices. It is analyzed and optimized in the belief that it holds the answers to our most challenging problems, from public policy to personal health. Is there a happy medium between the “gut” and data? (Registration required.) Read More »

Time & Space Annihilated: Innovation, Communication & Society

November 18, 2017
1:00 pm
Image of man with phone on plane

Across time and cultures, humans have designed forms and tools with which to communicate within larger governing structures. Arguably our digital communication is causing as profound a change as Gutenberg's press did. This talk will explore past and future communication technologies, the culture that gave birth to them, and possible implications for the future. (Registration required.) Read More »

Technology, Solitude, and Fame

November 18, 2017
1:00 pm
Image of woman with phone on mountaintop

In this breakout discussion, we will explore technology’s role at the intersection of fame and solitude. How do the technologies of publication that create modern fame—be they internet or print-based—transform lives that require solitude? (Registration required.) Read More »

War and Technological Advance: The Manhattan Project, the German Uranverein, and the Wartime Development of Nuclear Weapons

November 18, 2017
1:00 pm
Image of workers on Manhattan Project

This talk will examine the relationship between war and technological advancement through the lens of the race to develop nuclear weapons in World War II. What does this race tell us about the relationship between scientific discovery and the production of a useable commodity? (Registration required.) Read More »

Educator Discussion

November 18, 2017
1:00 pm
Image of educators

Educators are invited to this facilitated session to discuss the conference’s themes and connections and to explore and share potential classroom applications. (Registration required.) Read More »

Discussion and Reflection

November 18, 2017
1:00 pm
Image of Suzanne Brown leading a discussion

Using the advance readings as a starting point, this session, facilitated by VHC discussion leader extraordinaire Suzanne Brown, offers attendees an opportunity to reflect and discuss the themes and connections they have made thus far in the conference. (Registration required.) Read More »

Magic and Loss: The Internet as Art

November 18, 2017
2:35 pm – 3:50 pm

In just fifty years, the Internet has evolved from a military and engineering project to an extension of traditional media to its own full-fledged civilization. Writer and cultural critic Virginia Heffernan presents an original and far-reaching analysis of what the Internet is and does. (Registration required.) Read More »

February 2018

Self-Confessed: The Inappropriately Intimate Comics of Alison Bechdel

February 21, 2018
7:00 pm
Alison Bechdel cartoon

From her long-running comic strip Dykes to Watch Out For to her family memoirs Fun Home and Are You My Mother? Alison Bechdel has explored in graphic detail the overlap between the personal and the political, the domestic and the global. In this illustrated talk, she discusses how her cartooning has evolved over four decades. Read More »

Categories:

November 2018

How to Be an Antiracist

November 16, 2018
4:00 pm – 5:15 pm
Image of white supremacists with flag

In this deeply personal and empowering lecture, Ibram X. Kendi shifts the discussion from how not to be racist, to how to be an antiracist, offering direction to those who want to see a real antiracist America. (Registration required.) Read More »

From Here to Nowhere: Utopian Schemes in American Life

November 16, 2018
4:00 pm – 5:15 pm
Image of Methodist revival

Randall Balmer considers how The Great Awakening at the turn of the 19th century unleashed a flurry of utopian experiments, several of which had their roots in Vermont. (Registration required.) Read More »

Frederick Douglass, In Spite of Everything, Optimistic

November 16, 2018
4:00 pm – 5:15 pm

Despite having been an enslaved person, a leading abolitionist for decades, and a witness of the end of Reconstruction and the establishment of Jim Crow, Frederick Douglass had a deep 19th-century belief in progress. David Blight examines this brilliant, prominent, and influential American. (Registration required.) Read More »

Walt Whitman, America’s Great Optimistic Writer

November 16, 2018
4:00 pm – 5:15 pm
Image of Walt Whitman

Huck Gutman and Mary Lou Kete discuss the ebb and flow of optimism in Walt Whitman, an optimist among American writers, and yet one with a darker side. (Registration required.) Read More »

“Composite Nation:” Can America Find a Unifying Historical Narrative Rooted in Progress?

November 17, 2018
9:10 am – 10:25 am
Image of immigrant family looking at Statue of Liberty

Americans’ sense of hope or faith that tomorrow will be better than today has always depended upon not only when one lives, but also who one is. David Blight considers the ebb and flow of optimism throughout American history in light of this fact (Registration required.) Read More »

The Blessed Hope: Optimism and Apocalypticism in American History

November 17, 2018
10:40 am – 11:55 am
Image of painting of men on horseback

Randall Balmer explains how, from the earliest days of American history, Protestants have disagreed about interpreting various prophetic passages in the Bible. Their interpretations have sometimes inspired great waves of social reform, and other times have spurred Protestants to seek the second coming of Jesus and the imminent end of history. (Registration required.) Read More »

Tribal Nations, Manifest Destiny and the “Dying Indian”

November 17, 2018
10:40 am – 11:55 am
Image of tepees outside of frontier fort

Bruce Duthu considers how Native writers, artists and other humanists have confounded and complicated the national origin story. In the process, they have challenged the United States to live up to its professed commitments to justice for Native peoples as expressed in federal law and Indian affairs policy. (Registration required.) Read More »

Visions of Progress

November 17, 2018
10:40 am – 11:55 am
Image of painting of mountain scene

Jennifer Raab looks at 19th-century American landscape painters like Thomas Cole, Frederic Church, and Albert Bierstadt to consider how artists of that era represented progress and used the physical environment to express hope and doubt, past and future, and the local and the global. (Registration required.) Read More »

How the Gilded Age Created the Progressive Era

November 17, 2018
10:40 am – 11:55 am
Image of painting of U.S. map and woman

The voices of the Progressive Era, including Jane Addams, W. E. B. Du Bois, Theodore Roosevelt, and Zitkála-Šá, didn’t come from nowhere. Heather Cox Richardson explains how they articulated a vision for America that had its roots in the runaway capitalism of the Gilded Age. (Registration required.) Read More »

Discussion and Reflection on the Theme

November 17, 2018
10:40 am – 11:55 am
Image of Suzanne Brown leading a book discussion

VHC program scholar Suzanne Brown will expertly lead attendees in a discussion of three to four short selections that will explore the tension between the new world possibility of our young nation and the inevitable confrontation with social circumstance. Participants will receive these theme-related materials in advance of the conference. (Registration required.) Read More »

The American Pendulum and the Renewal of American Democracy

November 17, 2018
1:00 pm – 2:15 pm
Image of crowd outside of bank

Heather Cox Richardson explores how the economic and political crises of the 1850s, 1890s, and 1920s each created a backlash that inspired Americans to reclaim government of the people, by the people, and for the people. (Registration required.) Read More »

Salvation or Slippery Slope: Women as Barometers of Democratic Enthusiasm in American History 

November 17, 2018
2:30 pm – 3:45 pm
Image of women with flags and voting signs

Democracy has been a core element of American identity, but enthusiasm for it has waxed and waned throughout American history. Leslie Butler explores why the campaign for women’s political rights emerged when it did, and why it took so long to succeed. (Registration required.) Read More »

A.R. Ammons’s Corson’s Inlet: American Optimism at the End of the 20th Century

November 17, 2018
2:30 pm – 3:45 pm
Image of man walking along a beach at sunset

Ammons’s poem is about taking a seaside walk. Referring to what he is seeing, Ammons considers the “opposite” of optimism. violence, destruction, and terror. But he rejects them for an openness to experience. Huck Gutman will walk both experienced and new poetry readers through the poem into the sun. (Registration required.) Read More »

The Ebb and Flow of Optimism in 20th-Century America

November 17, 2018
2:30 pm – 3:45 pm
Image of man walking on moon

Mark Stoler will explore the ups and downs of American attitudes toward the future in what has been called “the American Century.” He will examine the various challenges to our national optimism, from the depths of the Great Depression in the 1930s through Vietnam and Watergate in the 1960s and 1970s, and our multiple responses to those challenges—responses that often succeeded in restoring optimism. (Registration required.) Read More »

Discussion and Reflection on the Theme

November 17, 2018
2:30 pm – 3:45 pm
Image of students standing outside

Adam Sargent engages a student-directed dialog using advance readings and student observations of the conference and its theme. (Registration required.) Read More »

Educator Discussion

November 17, 2018
2:30 pm – 3:45 pm
Image of educators at Fall Conference 2017

Educators are invited to this facilitated session to discuss the conference themes and connections, using advance readings to explore and share potential classroom applications. (Registration required.) Read More »

Emerson and the Literary Landscape of Optimism

November 17, 2018
4:00 pm – 5:15 pm
Image of American flag with sunset

Emerson’s optimism remains revolutionary. Mary Lou Kete discusses the intersection of Emerson’s legendary faith in the future of America and his faith in the power of poetry. (Registration required.) Read More »

October 2019

Graphic Novels to Watch Out For

October 2, 2019
7:00 pm

Alison Bechdel, author of the comic strip Dykes to Watch Out For and the graphic memoir Fun Home: A Family Tragicomedy, discusses what makes comics such a powerful medium for addressing and upending oppression. Read More »

Categories:

November 2019

The Book of Mormon and the Search for an American Homeland

November 15, 2019
4:00 pm – 5:15 pm
Painting of wagon trains

A powerful text that sparked a mass American migration, the Book of Mormon is arguably the most significant book published in the United States during the nineteenth century. We will consider how this book reveals what it means to leave one homeland in search of another. (Registration required.) Read More »

The Jewish Diaspora in Twenty Recipes

November 15, 2019
4:00 pm – 5:15 pm
Bowl of matzo soup

Food—like music and language—it is a strong link to our past. We’ll explore recipes that Jews took with them as a diasporic people to the Balkans, Europe, North Africa, and America. (Registration required.) Read More »

Re-envisioning Relationships with Place through Indigenous Studies

November 15, 2019
4:00 pm – 5:15 pm
Native American materials on shelves

Jessica Dolan shares insights from her doctoral work on Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) relationships with place, and explains how these narratives themselves have migrated over time. (Registration required.) Read More »

Rethinking Native, Stranger, and Home: From the Lure of the Local to a Progressive Sense of Place

November 15, 2019
4:00 pm – 5:15 pm
Woman with suitcase walking toward sunset

The distinction between native and stranger, often used to justify exclusion and violence, is grounded in a strong sense of home and local belonging. William Edelglass explores contemporary ideas of place that are more inclusive, dynamic, and accepting of difference. (Registration required.) Read More »

“Whose Land Have I Come to Now?”: The Foreigner in Homer’s Odyssey (Part 1)

November 16, 2019
9:30 am – 10:45 am
Mosaic of scene from the Odyssey

Odysseus was a refugee who sought repeatedly to survive among alien landscapes and foreign peoples. Carol Dougherty, Professor of Classical Studies at Wellesley College, explains how the Odyssey prompts us to consider questions about the foreigner beyond “Who is he?” or “Where is he from?” (Registration required.) Read More »

How to Save an Alphabet

November 16, 2019
11:00 am – 12:15 pm
Image of ancient alphabet writing

More than 85% of the world's alphabets are in danger of extinction, threatening the wisdom, history and sense of identity of the culture that created them. A global movement among indigenous and minority groups now aims to reclaim these languages. (Registration required.) Read More »

“Whose Land Have I Come to Now?”: The Foreigner in Homer’s Odyssey (Part 2)

November 16, 2019
11:00 am – 12:15 pm
Stone carving of men in boat

After Odysseus awakens on the shores of his native Ithaca, he thinks he is once again among foreign peoples. Yet Homer suggests a model for a reciprocal relationship between the familiar and the foreign. (Registration required.) Read More »

Discussion and Reflection on the Theme

November 16, 2019
11:00 am – 12:15 pm
Image of Suzanne Brown leading a book discussion

Vermont Humanities program scholar Suzanne Brown will expertly lead attendees in a discussion using excerpts from "The Line Becomes a River" by Francisco Cantu. (Registration required.) Read More »

Voices of the World

November 16, 2019
11:00 am – 12:15 pm
Women in Muslim dress with man at table

Four panelists from differing countries will share their stories as refugees and answer questions in a facilitated conversation. (Registration required.) Read More »

World and Town: A Discussion on Home and Identity

November 16, 2019
11:00 am – 12:15 pm

Gish Jen will read an excerpt from her novel, World and Town, which is set in a small Vermont town where the world comes to the townspeople through the arrival of Cambodian refugees. Read More »

Food as Memory: Migrants, Food Traditions and Community Markets

November 16, 2019
12:15 pm – 3:30 pm
Hands with dishes of colorful food.

Familiar foods call up memories of home. During this walking tour in the Old North End of Burlington, we’ll sample foods of various cultures and meet people who make a living through local agriculture ventures and food markets. (Registration required.) Read More »

Roads Taken: The Great Jewish Migrations to the New World and the Peddlers Who Forged the Way

November 16, 2019
1:15 pm – 2:30 pm
Group of peddlers in desert

Beginning in the mid-19th century, Jewish male immigrants to the United States found a living through a familiar occupation. In doing so they learned much about America, and Americans learned about them. Dr. Hasia Diner, Professor of American Jewish history at New York University, explores the experience of these on-the-road peddlers. (Registration required.) Read More »

The Refugee Journey

November 16, 2019
2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Man with children looking at boats

The game Refugee Journey shares the challenges that refugees face as they attempt to find safety. Players draw from experience cards based on actual refugee experiences, and a facilitator personifies border guards, smugglers, medical officers and immigration officers. The game ends when a player departs for resettlement, thus making the point that less than 1% of refugees gain such safety. Read More »

*CANCELLED* Rediscovering N’dakinna: Abenaki Erasure, Continuity of Culture, and Transformative Education

November 16, 2019
2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Abenaki Teacher Training

Since early colonization, the Abenaki people have been displaced within their homeland of N'dakinna. Four Abenaki tribes recently received state recognition, giving Vermonters a new opportunity to learn about Abenaki culture. Vera Sheehan will contrast the Abenaki experience with that of other migrants and refugees and share the perspective of traditional knowledgeways. (Registration required.) Read More »

How the Great Migration Changed American History

November 16, 2019
2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Image of girl in front of old car.

Racial violence and the economic stagnation of sharecropping encouraged many black southerners to seek steady factory work in northern cities like New York and Chicago. But once in these cities, these migrants still faced economic and racial challenges. (Registration required.) Read More »

Educator Discussion

November 16, 2019
2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Image of educators at Fall Conference 2017

Educators are invited to this facilitated session to discuss the conference themes and connections, using advance readings to explore and share potential classroom applications. (Registration required.) Read More »

Discussion and Reflection on the Theme

November 16, 2019
2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Image of students standing outside

Katherine Caldwell engages a student-directed dialog using advance readings and student observations of the conference and its theme. (Registration required.) Read More »

Kinan Azmeh Cityband

November 16, 2019
5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Kinan Azmeh

Clarinetist Kinan Azmeh weaves the mesmerizing sounds of his native Syria into a form of haunting and celebratory Arabic Jazz with his ensemble, CityBand. We present this special treat to close our conference through a partnership with the UVM Lane Series. (Tickets required.) Read More »

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