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Humanities for Everyone

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Dudley H. Davis Center

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590 Main Street
Burlington, VT 05401 United States
(802) 656-4636

November 2019

The Book of Mormon and the Search for an American Homeland

November 15
4:00 pm – 5:15 pm
Painting of wagon trains

A powerful text that sparked a mass American migration, the Book of Mormon is arguably the most significant book published in the United States during the nineteenth century. We will consider how this book reveals what it means to leave one homeland in search of another. (Registration required.) Read More »

Re-envisioning Relationships with Place through Indigenous Studies

November 15
4:00 pm – 5:15 pm
Native American materials on shelves

Jessica Dolan shares insights from her doctoral work on Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) relationships with place, and explains how these narratives themselves have migrated over time. (Registration required.) Read More »

The Jewish Diaspora in Twenty Recipes

November 15
4:00 pm – 5:15 pm
Bowl of matzo soup

Food—like music and language—it is a strong link to our past. We’ll explore recipes that Jews took with them as a diasporic people to the Balkans, Europe, North Africa, and America. (Registration required.) Read More »

Rethinking Native, Stranger, and Home: From the Lure of the Local to a Progressive Sense of Place

November 15
4:00 pm – 5:15 pm
Woman with suitcase walking toward sunset

The distinction between native and stranger, often used to justify exclusion and violence, is grounded in a strong sense of home and local belonging. William Edelglass explores contemporary ideas of place that are more inclusive, dynamic, and accepting of difference. (Registration required.) Read More »

“Whose Land Have I Come to Now?”: The Foreigner in Homer’s Odyssey (Part 1)

November 16
9:30 am – 10:45 am
Mosaic of scene from the Odyssey

Odysseus was a refugee who sought repeatedly to survive among alien landscapes and foreign peoples. Carol Dougherty, Professor of Classical Studies at Wellesley College, explains how the Odyssey prompts us to consider questions about the foreigner beyond “Who is he?” or “Where is he from?” (Registration required.) Read More »

How to Save an Alphabet

November 16
11:00 am – 12:15 pm
Image of ancient alphabet writing

More than 85% of the world's alphabets are in danger of extinction, threatening the wisdom, history and sense of identity of the culture that created them. A global movement among indigenous and minority groups now aims to reclaim these languages. (Registration required.) Read More »

“Whose Land Have I Come to Now?”: The Foreigner in Homer’s Odyssey (Part 2)

November 16
11:00 am – 12:15 pm
Stone carving of men in boat

After Odysseus awakens on the shores of his native Ithaca, he thinks he is once again among foreign peoples. Yet Homer suggests a model for a reciprocal relationship between the familiar and the foreign. (Registration required.) Read More »

Voices of the World

November 16
11:00 am – 12:15 pm
Women in Muslim dress with man at table

Four panelists from differing countries will share their stories as refugees and answer questions in a facilitated conversation. (Registration required.) Read More »

Discussion and Reflection on the Theme

November 16
11:00 am – 12:15 pm
Image of Suzanne Brown leading a book discussion

Vermont Humanities program scholar Suzanne Brown will expertly lead attendees in a discussion using excerpts from "The Line Becomes a River" by Francisco Cantu. (Registration required.) Read More »

World and Town: A Discussion on Home and Identity

November 16
11:00 am – 12:15 pm

Gish Jen will read an excerpt from her novel, World and Town, which is set in a small Vermont town where the world comes to the townspeople through the arrival of Cambodian refugees. Read More »

Food as Memory: Migrants, Food Traditions and Community Markets

November 16
12:15 pm – 3:30 pm
Hands with dishes of colorful food.

Familiar foods call up memories of home. During this walking tour in the Old North End of Burlington, we’ll sample foods of various cultures and meet people who make a living through local agriculture ventures and food markets. (Registration required.) Read More »

Roads Taken: The Great Jewish Migrations to the New World and the Peddlers Who Forged the Way

November 16
1:15 pm – 2:30 pm
Group of peddlers in desert

Beginning in the mid-19th century, Jewish male immigrants to the United States found a living through a familiar occupation. In doing so they learned much about America, and Americans learned about them. Dr. Hasia Diner, Professor of American Jewish history at New York University, explores the experience of these on-the-road peddlers. (Registration required.) Read More »

How the Great Migration Changed American History

November 16
2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Image of girl in front of old car.

Racial violence and the economic stagnation of sharecropping encouraged many black southerners to seek steady factory work in northern cities like New York and Chicago. But once in these cities, these migrants still faced economic and racial challenges. (Registration required.) Read More »

Rediscovering N’dakinna: Abenaki Erasure, Continuity of Culture, and Transformative Education

November 16
2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Abenaki Teacher Training

Since early colonization, the Abenaki people have been displaced within their homeland of N'dakinna. Four Abenaki tribes recently received state recognition, giving Vermonters a new opportunity to learn about Abenaki culture. Vera Sheehan will contrast the Abenaki experience with that of other migrants and refugees and share the perspective of traditional knowledgeways. (Registration required.) Read More »

The Refugee Journey

November 16
2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Man with children looking at boats

The game Refugee Journey shares the challenges that refugees face as they attempt to find safety. Players draw from experience cards based on actual refugee experiences, and a facilitator personifies border guards, smugglers, medical officers and immigration officers. The game ends when a player departs for resettlement, thus making the point that less than 1% of refugees gain such safety. Read More »

Discussion and Reflection on the Theme

November 16
2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Image of students standing outside

Katherine Caldwell engages a student-directed dialog using advance readings and student observations of the conference and its theme. (Registration required.) Read More »

Educator Discussion

November 16
2:45 pm – 4:00 pm
Image of educators at Fall Conference 2017

Educators are invited to this facilitated session to discuss the conference themes and connections, using advance readings to explore and share potential classroom applications. (Registration required.) Read More »

Kinan Azmeh Cityband

November 16
5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Kinan Azmeh

Clarinetist Kinan Azmeh weaves the mesmerizing sounds of his native Syria into a form of haunting and celebratory Arabic Jazz with his ensemble, CityBand. We present this special treat to close our conference through a partnership with the UVM Lane Series. (Tickets required.) Read More »

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