Vermont Humanities

Latino Journeys to Vermont and Beyond

Manchester Community Library 138 Cemetery Ave, Manchester Center

The journeys of Latino migrant farm workers to Vermont are part of a larger and longer story of Latino migrants coming to the region in search of work. Professor Carmen Whalen, Professor of History and Chair of the Latinx Studies program at Williams College, will present context for this important Vermont Reads book, "The Most Costly Journey."

The History of Cosplay

Manchester Community Library 138 Cemetery Ave, Manchester Center

Cosplay— the practice of dressing up as a character from a movie, book, or video game—has a long history within science fiction and fantasy fandom. In recent years, it’s become a mainstream phenomenon. Andrew Liptak, author of Cosplay: A History, describes how cosplay has evolved from a niche activity of convention-goers in the mid-20th century to wide popularity today.

Agriculture and Abolition: The Politics of 19th Century Landscape Painting

Manchester Community Library 138 Cemetery Ave, Manchester Center

In his landmark 1864 book, “Man and Nature,” George Perkins Marsh drew distinctions between the “free” landscapes of the prosperous North and the Southern practice of cultivating cotton and tobacco with slave labor. Reviewing Marsh’s ideas, along with the works of Hudson River School artists and their Southern counterparts, Smithsonian curator Eleanor Jones Harvey explores how images of agriculture served abolitionist politics in the 19th century. 

When the Bicycle Came to Vermont

Manchester Community Library 138 Cemetery Ave, Manchester Center

UVM professor Luis Vivanco explores the fascinating early history of the bicycle in Vermont, an invention that generated widespread curiosity when it arrived here in the 1880s. Over the next decade, enthusiasm exploded statewide as bicycles became safer, women took to the wheel, roads improved, and retailers developed novel advertising techniques to draw in buyers.