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Kellogg-Hubbard Library

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135 Main St
Montpelier, VT 05602 United States
www.kellogghubbard.org

January 2016

Latino Americans, Episode Two: Empire of Dreams (1880-1942)

January 19, 2016
6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
Image of campesino

This PBS documentary series chronicles the rich and varied experiences of Latinos. Read More »

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Book Discussion: How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents by Julia Alvarez

January 27, 2016
6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

This series examines families displaced by the dictatorial regimes of Trujillo and Castro, exploring the complicated, ongoing relationships that those who come to the United States have with their home countries and cultures. Read More »

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Interactive Author Talks: S.S. Taylor

January 30, 2016
2:00 pm – 3:30 pm

This series takes place in person at Kellogg-Hubbard Library with videoconferencing connections to St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, Rutland Free Library, Rockingham Free Library, and Fletcher Free Library, Burlington. In this session, author S.S. Taylor will talk about finding ideas, lead a writing exercise, and reflect on work posted on the Young Writers Project website. Read More »

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February 2016

The Hollywood Blacklist

February 9, 2016
7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Film expert Rick Winston will explore the origins of the blacklist in Hollywood’s labor unrest and what led to its ultimate end, showing clips from films that were affected by the fear that consumed Hollywood, including High Noon, On the Waterfront, and Salt of the Earth. Read More »

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Book Discussion: The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz

February 24, 2016
6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

This series examines families displaced by the dictatorial regimes of Trujillo and Castro, exploring the complicated, ongoing relationships that those who come to the United States have with their home countries and cultures. Read More »

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March 2016

Latino Americans, Episode Four: The New Latinos (1946-1965) *New date!*

March 1, 2016
6:30 pm
Image of girl on her father's shoulders

This PBS documentary series chronicles the rich and varied experiences of Latinos, who have helped shape our country and gradually constructed a new identity within the changing yet repeating context of American history. Read More »

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Daisy Turner’s Kin

March 2, 2016
7:00 pm
Image of Daisy Turner

Vermont Folklife Center founder Jane Beck considers the family narrative of Daisy Turner (1883–1988), from enslavement in Africa to a farmstead in Grafton. Read More »

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Book Discussion: Dreaming in Cuban by Cristina García

March 23, 2016
6:30 pm

This series examines families displaced by the dictatorial regimes of Trujillo and Castro, exploring the complicated, ongoing relationships that those who come to the United States have with their home countries and cultures. Read More »

Latino Americans, Episode Five: Prejudice and Pride (1965-1980) **New date!**

March 24, 2016
6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

This episode tells the story of Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta’s struggle to organize for the rights of Latino migrant farm workers in California and provides historical background on Latinos’ struggle for civil rights and voter participation. Read More »

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April 2016

PoemCity: Reading with Poets Ralph Culver and Sydney Lea

April 9, 2016
2:00 pm

Ralph Culver, author of the Anabiosis Press prize-winning chapbook Both Distances, and Sydney Lea, one-time Poet Laureate of Vermont, join together to offer a fantastic evening of poetry followed by an audience Q&A. Read More »

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Book Discussion: The Prince of los Cocuyos: A Miami Childhood by Richard Blanco

April 27, 2016
6:30 pm

This series examines families displaced by the dictatorial regimes of Trujillo and Castro, exploring the complicated, ongoing relationships that those who come to the United States have with their home countries and cultures. Read More »

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PoemCity: Reading with Poets Kate Farrell and Baron Wormser

April 28, 2016
7:00 pm

Come to the Library for an evening of exceptional poetry with poet Baron Wormser and writer and actress Kate Farrell. Read More »

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May 2016

Lindbergh and the Spirit of St. Louis

May 4, 2016
7:00 pm

Writer Reeve Lindbergh tells how the Spirit of St. Louis, the plane in which 25-year-old Charles Lindbergh made his non-stop New York-to-Paris flight, was also the vehicle that brought together her father and mother, and established a family. Read More »

Vermont Reads: Human-Powered

May 5, 2016
6:30 pm

"Human-Powered" is a multi-media presentation highlighting fifteen years of human-powered mountain adventures logged by local photographers and storytellers, Brian Mohr and Emily Johnson. Read More »

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Vermont Reads: Cooking at the Bottom of the World

May 24, 2016
6:30 pm

Jenn Toce, co-owner of Birchgrove Baking, has spent the last two winters as a cook in Antarctica at the United States’ Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station. Jenn will discuss the challenges of cooking and living at the bottom of the world. Read More »

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October 2016

The Examined Life

October 5, 2016
7:00 pm
Image of hiker at top of mountain

Socrates famously proclaimed, “The unexamined life is not worth living.” Philosophy scholar Suzanne Claxton explores what constitutes the examined life and how we may best pursue it. Read More »

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November 2016

Celebrating E. B. White

November 2, 2016
7:00 pm
Image of EB White with dog

From Charlotte’s Web to his exquisite essays in The New Yorker, E.B. White remains the master’s master of elegant prose, sophisticated wit, and graceful irreverence. Drawing on his stories, essays, poems, and letters, Dartmouth professor Nancy Jay Crumbine celebrates White’s versatility and enormous legacy. Read More »

January 2017

Zen, Past and Present: Where Did It Come From and Where Is It Now?

January 4, 2017
7:00 pm

Most Americans have heard of Zen Buddhism, and some Americans practice it. What is this form of Buddhism and how did it arise? Middlebury College religion professor Elizabeth Morrison examines the history of Zen and its place in the U.S. Read More »

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March 2017

The United States and NATO: Lead or Leave?

March 1, 2017
7:00 pm

During the 2016 presidential campaign, some questioned traditional US policy by calling NATO obsolete. Stan Sloan, Visiting Scholar at Middlebury College and author of Defense of the West, considers the costs and benefits of America’s leadership of NATO and discusses options for U.S. relations with its European allies. Read More »

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April 2017

Forty Years of Poetry

April 5, 2017
7:00 pm

Author and Middlebury professor Jay Parini reads from his recently published New and Collected Poems, 1975-2015 and discusses why poetry matters in a world of prose. Read More »

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Shake Your Windows and Rattle Your Walls: The Protest Poetry of Bob Dylan

April 13, 2017
7:00 pm

Bob Dylan's 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature was somewhat controversial. In this workshop, Amy Herrick will discuss some of Dylan's protest songs, analyze his literary style, and look at some of the arguments for and against his status as Nobel Laureate. Part of PoemCity 2017. Read More »

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Reading and Discussion of Brown Girl Dreaming: For Parents and Kids

April 18, 2017
6:00 pm

Read Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson and come discuss the book with librarian Nicole Westbom. This beautiful memoir of the author's childhood is written in verse. Part of PoemCity 2017. Read More »

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Poetry Reading: “The Catamount” by Sarah Van Arsdale

April 29, 2017
10:30 am

Come join Sarah as she reads her narrative poem and shares her illustrations about the Vermont catamount. This reading is perfect for children 8 and older and adults. "The Catamount" was recently published by Nomadic Press and will be available for sale and signing. Part of PoemCity 2017. Read More »

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May 2017

The Meaning of Faith in Christian and Jewish Thought

May 3, 2017
7:00 pm

Ronald B. Sobel, Senior Rabbi Emeritus of the world’s largest Jewish house of worship, examines the similarities and differences in the idea and reality of faith as understood and lived in both religions. Read More »

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October 2017

The President’s Global Policies

October 4, 2017
7:00 pm

Veteran American diplomat George Jaeger discusses President Trump’s America First global policies, the changes they may entail, and their possible implications. Read More »

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November 2017

Translating Homer and the Art of Writing

November 1, 2017
7:00 pm
Image of mosiac of Homer in a ship

Caroline Alexander, author of The Endurance: Shackleton’s Legendary Expedition and translator of a new edition of Homer’s Iliad, examines the challenges and pleasures of translating great literature. Read More »

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January 2018

Lessons Learned from the Holocaust for Today’s World

January 3, 2018
7:00 pm
Image of Jews being deported by Nazis

The UN High Commission for Refugees calculates that there are more people forced from their homes and on the move today than following the disruptions of WWII and the Holocaust. Holocaust scholar and Dartmouth professor Irene Kacandes offers seven lessons she has learned from studying the Holocaust and considers how we can apply them to today’s crises. Read More »

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March 2018

Vermont’s Remarkable Sharpshooters and Gettysburg

March 28, 2018
7:00 pm
Image of sharpshooters taking aim

Vermont sent far more sharpshooters to the Union armies than any other state, on a per capita basis. Historian Howard Coffin will discuss his recent research into this little recognized group and consider the reasons why Vermont may have been so well-represented in this elite group of marksmen. Read More »

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April 2018

Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales: Still Funny After All These Years

April 4, 2018
7:00 pm

Dartmouth professor Peter Travis discusses the genius, literary achievement, and enduring humanity of Geoffrey Chaucer, the fourteenth-century “Father of English Poetry.” Read More »

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PoemCity 2018: A Case of You: Joni Mitchell’s Poetic Vision

April 9, 2018
7:00 pm

VPR's Reuben Jackson will examine—and celebrate—texts from Joni Mitchell classics such as "Blue" and "Don Juan's Restless Daughter." Audience participation is lovingly encouraged. Part of PoemCity 2018. Read More »

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Poems in Performance: A Cure for Poemphobia

April 12, 2018
7:00 pm
Image of speaker in front of audience

In the past fifty years, a magical loosening of poetry" has opened doors for reluctant readers, and the performance of poems in "poetry slams" has attracted new audiences. In this informal talk, slam poet Geof Hewitt will offer poems that defy stereotype, and discuss strategies for finding more. Read More »

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PoemCity 2018: Vermont Studio Center Poets Reading

April 19, 2018
7:30 pm

Join us for a group reading by poets with ties to the Vermont Studio Center, including Gary Clark, Kylie Gellatly, Jody Gladding, Sam Hughes, Andrea Martin, and Meaghan Reynolds. Part of PoemCity 2018. Read More »

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PoemCity 2018: Poetry Play Time with Rosa Castellano

April 20, 2018
3:30 pm

Through reading, writing, drawing, and crafting we’ll play with some kid-friendly poems. Please bring any favorite poems to share over a snack. Ideal for children 7-11 years old. Part of PoemCity 2018. Read More »

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PoemCity 2018: David Hinton Poetry Reading

April 26, 2018
7:00 pm

David Hinton will read from his forthcoming book of poems Desert and other work. Hinton is a writer and translator who has produced a body of work exploring the weave of consciousness and landscape informed throughout by the insights of ancient Chinese culture. Read More »

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May 2018

Vincent Van Gogh and the Books He Read

May 2, 2018
7:00 pm

Van Gogh’s letters reveal that his paintings and drawings were inspired by his reading as well as by people, nature, and other painters’ work. Art historian Carol Berry shows the profound influence of the works of Harriet Beecher Stowe, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, and others on Van Gogh’s life and art. Read More »

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July 2018

Reading Frederick Douglass 2018: Montpelier

July 3, 2018
12:00 pm
Image of Reading Frederick Douglass event in Montpelier

Join us as we read together the fiery July 5, 1852 speech in which the great abolitionist orator Frederick Douglass took exception to being asked to commemorate the signing of the Declaration of Independence. This is a participatory event. Read More »

December 2018

The Legacy of Rachel Carson

December 5, 2018
7:00 pm
Image of Rachel Carson

Silent Spring not only launched the environmental movement but also identified fundamental problems with our relationship to nature. Dartmouth professor Nancy Jay Crumbine explores Carson’s clarity, courage, and brilliance. Read More »

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January 2019

Mad Men and Mad Women: The Construction of Gender in Mid-Century America

January 2, 2019
7:00 pm
Image of man and woman in retro clothes

Using AMC’s TV series Mad Men as an introduction, Middlebury professor Joyce Mao examines the Cold War foundations of gender in the US at the dawn of the 1960s, when the federal government and corporate America indelibly shaped middle-class masculinity and femininity. Read More »

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March 2019

Virtue and Vice: The World of Vermeer’s Women

March 6, 2019
7:00 pm
Image of painting of milk maid

Dartmouth professor Jane Carroll examines the stories of courtship, seduction, and virtue portrayed and the encoded messages presented in the works of 17th-century Dutch painter Jan Vermeer. Read More »

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April 2019

Emily Dickinson: Poet of New England

April 3, 2019
7:00 pm
Image of Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson lived her entire life in Amherst, Massachusetts. One of the greatest American poets, and probably the most important woman poet of all time, she was also a quintessential New England poet. UVM professor emeritus Huck Gutman explores what Dickinson can teach us. Read More »

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May 2019

The Architecture of Montpelier

May 1, 2019
7:00 pm
Image of Montpelier buildings

Vermont State Curator David Schutz explores Montpelier’s rich architectural history. He will follow his First Wednesdays program with a walking tour of Montpelier on Saturday, May 4, beginning at the library at 10:00 am. Read More »

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The Architecture of Montpelier Walking Tour

May 4, 2019
10:00 am
Image of Montpelier buildings

Vermont State Curator David Schutz follows his May 1 First Wednesdays program with a walking tour of Montpelier. Read More »

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July 2019

Reading Frederick Douglass 2019 – Montpelier

July 3, 2019
12:00 pm
People reading speech outside of Kellogg-Hubbard Library

Join us as we read together the fiery July 5, 1852 speech in which the great abolitionist orator Frederick Douglass took exception to being asked to commemorate the signing of the Declaration of Independence. This is a participatory event. Read More »

October 2019

Dictionary Days: A Defining Passion

October 2, 2019
7:00 pm

Amherst College professor Ilan Stavans shares extraordinary and often hilarious anecdotes about dictionaries through the ages, while reflecting on a life dedicated to honoring words. Read More »

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November 2019

Repeopling Vermont: How We Got to Where We Are

November 6, 2019
7:00 pm

Historians Paul Searls and Amanda Gustin lead a conversation about the changing face of Vermont in the twentieth century and the efforts to bring much-needed development while preserving Vermont’s rural values. Read More »

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December 2019

Policing and Community in Vermont

December 4, 2019
7:00 pm

Burlington Police Chief Brandon del Pozo explores issues of criminal justice, health, and safety in the Queen City, and how citizens and police can work together innovatively to create safer and healthier communities. Read More »

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January 2020

Lifting Shakespeare Off the Page

January 8, 2020
7:00 pm
Man and woman from Othello

In this interactive workshop, educator and author Peter Gould helps participants access their own powerful voice by reading, reciting, and performing Shakespeare. Learn how to bring new life to immortal characters! No previous theater training necessary; observers also welcome. Read More »

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March 2020

The Legacy of Nicholas Black Elk

March 4, 2020
7:00 pm

Author and ethnographer Damian Costello discusses the life of Lakota holy man Nicholas Black Elk and his famous book Black Elk Speaks. He explores how Black Elk’s understanding of Lakota philosophy can help us see the natural world as a unified whole, and how Black Elk’s hope amidst great tragedy can inform how we approach the crises of our age. Read More »

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October 2020

*DIGITAL* I Wonder as I Wander: Duke Ellington’s Nature – Inspired Works

October 7, 2020
7:00 pm
Duke Ellington smiling at the piano

Reuben Jackson, former host of VPR’s Friday Night Jazz, explores Duke Ellington compositions that spotlight the jazz legend’s growth as an arranger and composer. (Pre-registration required.) Read More »

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Book Discussion: Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

October 12, 2020
6:30 pm
Image of Zora Neale Hurston

During the 1920s, New York's Harlem neighborhood hosted an explosion of African-American cultural expression. This series features a history of the era alongside texts that have come to define it. Read More »

November 2020

*DIGITAL* Life on the Other Border: Farmworkers and Food Justice in Vermont

November 4, 2020
7:00 pm
Latino man picking tomatoes in field

For more than seven years, UVM professor Teresa Mares has studied food access among the Latinx farmworker community in Vermont. Her ethnographic research illuminates the many ways workers sustain themselves and their families. (Pre-registration required.) Read More »

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Book Discussion: Cane by Jean Toomer

November 16, 2020
6:30 pm
Image of Zora Neale Hurston

During the 1920s, New York's Harlem neighborhood hosted an explosion of African-American cultural expression. This series features a history of the era alongside texts that have come to define it. Read More »

December 2020

*DIGITAL* The United States and the World in 2021

December 2, 2020
7:00 pm
People in UN room around circular table

Whether under a second Trump administration or a new Democratic-led administration, the United States will face multiple national security issues in 2021. Stan Sloan considers our country’s relationship with allies and adversaries, as well as the impact of the Covid-19 crisis. (Pre-registration required.) Read More »

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January 2021

Book Discussion: The Portable Harlem Renaissance Reader by David Lewis

January 11
6:30 pm
Image of Zora Neale Hurston

During the 1920s, New York's Harlem neighborhood hosted an explosion of African-American cultural expression. This series features a history of the era alongside texts that have come to define it. Read More »

*DIGITAL* Reinventing the Family Home

January 12
7:00 pm

Middlebury College professor Erin Sassin examines how American reformers and homeowners have, in pursuit of “the simple life,” attempted to reinvent the form and idea of the single-family home, from farmhouses and communal experiments to the current tiny house phenomenon. (Pre-registration required.) Read More »

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February 2021

*DIGITAL* We Are Still Here

February 3
7:00 pm
Joe and Jess Bruchac

In this online Farmers Night program, father and son storytellers and musicians Joseph and Jesse Bruchac of the Nulhegan Abenaki Nation will use drum, flute, rattle, and vocals to address the continued presence and vibrant cultural heritage of the Wabanaki Nations of Ndakinna. (Registration required.) Read More »

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Book Discussion: Selected Poems of Langston Hughes by Langston Hughes

February 22
6:30 pm
Image of Zora Neale Hurston

During the 1920s, New York's Harlem neighborhood hosted an explosion of African-American cultural expression. This series features a history of the era alongside texts that have come to define it. Read More »

March 2021

*DIGITAL* In Wildness: Imagining the American West

March 3
7:00 pm
Man on horse beside edge of Grand Canyon

Thoreau wrote that “the West of which I speak is but another name for the Wild,” and indeed for much of its history the American West has been associated with the idea of wildness. St. Michael’s College professor Nathaniel Lewis explores our understanding of both nation and nature in the imagined West. (Registration required.) Read More »

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April 2021

*DIGITAL* Poetry During Covid-19

April 7
7:00 pm
Painting of woman's head with tree and other colorful natural objects

Inspired by the Mary Oliver poem, “Wild Geese,” Saint Michael's College professor Adrie Kusserow wrote “Mary Oliver for Corona Times.” She’ll discuss Oliver’s poem and explore ways in which the pandemic has sparked creative work. (Registration required.) Read More »

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May 2021

*DIGITAL* Why Not in Vermont? The Long Campaign for Women’s Suffrage

May 5
7:00 pm
Early Vermont suffragists Clarina Howard Nichols

Why did Vermont lawmakers resist women voting in the 19th and 20th centuries? Through the stories of three Vermont suffragists, Lyn Blackwell outlines the shifting debate over women’s full citizenship in from the 1850s until 1920. Registration required. Read More »

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October 2021

*DIGITAL* The Ethics of Vermont Eugenics: Past and Present

October 6
7:00 pm
Anti-eugenics tapestry with tree

In the name of “human betterment” a century ago, public institutions and private organizations in Vermont chose some of the state’s most marginalized persons for institutionalization, sterilization, and family separation. Harvard Medical School lecturer Charlene Galarneau explores the factors that led to Vermont’s distinct expression of eugenics, and its continuing legacies today. Read More »

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