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First Congregational Church of Manchester

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3624 Main St
Manchester, VT 05254 United States
http://mclvt.org

March 2016

The Future of Investigative Reporting

March 2, 2016
7:00 pm
Image of reporter with a raised hand

In the centenary year of the Pulitzer Prize, David Sanger, chief Washington correspondent for The New York Times and member of two Pulitzer-winning investigative teams, looks at what investigative reporting takes and what it will take in the future. Read More »

W.B. Yeats’ “Easter 1916” a Century Later

March 16, 2016
7:00 pm
Image of Easter 1916 uprising

Mount Holyoke professor Amy E. Martin considers the iconic poem, the Irish Republicans’ insurrection, and the complexities of its commemoration a century later. (Rescheduled from February 3.) Read More »

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April 2016

The People’s Pope

April 6, 2016
7:00 pm

Pope Francis’s emphasis on the poor and marginalized has energized social justice in the Catholic Church. Author Martin Weinstein, professor emeritus at William Paterson University, examines the foundations of the Pope’s philosophy, the history of the church in Latin America, and the rise of liberation theology. Read More »

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May 2016

Sentimental Journeys: Literature and Long Wars

May 4, 2016
7:00 pm

West Point English professor Elizabeth Samet, author of Soldier’s Heart, considers how sentimentality about country and war holds important implications for policymakers, combatants, and the public. Read More »

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June 2016

The Wyeths: First Family of American Art

June 1, 2016
7:00 pm
Image of N.C. Wyeth in his studio

Shelburne Museum director Thomas Denenberg discusses the Wyeths—N. C. (1882–1945), Andrew (1917–2009), and Jamie (b. 1946)—and offers new perspectives on these three painters who have shaped the way Americans view their world. (Rescheduled from January 6.) Read More »

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October 2016

What Chinese Philosophers Can Teach Us About the Good Life

October 5, 2016
7:00 pm

Harvard Professor of Chinese History Michael Puett and journalist Christine Gross-Loh, co-authors of the international bestseller The Path: What Chinese Philosophers Can Teach Us About the Good Life, share how Puett’s hugely popular course on Chinese philosophy is life-changing for many of his students. Read More »

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November 2016

Chopin’s Preludes

November 2, 2016
7:00 pm

In this performance talk, pianist Michael Arnowitt explores the life of Frederic Chopin and his Preludes, quintessential Romantic miniatures that span the full range of human experience and emotion. Read More »

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December 2016

Where Am I? The Power of Uniqueness

December 7, 2016
7:00 pm

Former Scenic America President and TED talk lecturer Ed McMahon, who holds the Charles E. Fraser Chair on Sustainable Development at the Urban Land Institute, highlights the importance of a sense of place and explores why our physical surroundings are worth caring about. Read More »

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January 2017

Reading for the Life of the World

January 4, 2017
7:00 pm
Image of painting of woman and daughter reading

Vermonter Katherine Paterson, award-winning author of Bridge to Terabithia and The Great Gilly Hopkins, considers the importance and many benefits of reading. Read More »

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February 2017

All About Eve

February 1, 2017
7:00 pm
Image of painting of Eve

Dartmouth professor of religion Susan Ackerman considers both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the Adam and Eve story and how recent scholarship on women and the Bible pushes us to rethink our common assumptions about Eve. Read More »

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March 2017

The Impressionists: Painters of Modern Life

March 1, 2017
7:00 pm

Middlebury professor Kirsten Hoving examines how Impressionists focused in their paintings of contemporary life on cutting-edge modern subjects, imbuing them with controversial, even shocking, meanings. Read More »

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Vermont’s Musical Ladies

March 16, 2017
1:00 pm
Image of Linda Radtke singing

Singer and researcher Linda Radtke, joined by pianist Arthur Zorn, explores the contributions of Vermont women to the traditions of parlor songs, women’s club music contests, and social reform efforts. Read More »

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April 2017

Churchill and Roosevelt: The Personal Element in Their Partnership

April 5, 2017
7:00 pm
Image of Churchill and Roosevelt in Casablance

University of Vermont History Professor Emeritus Mark A. Stoler examines the important personal relationship between Britain’s Prime Minister and America’s President during their World War II alliance. Read More »

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May 2017

Race and Reunion: The Civil War in American Memory

May 3, 2017
7:00 pm

Yale professor David Blight discusses America’s collective memory of the Civil War and the perilous path of remembering and forgetting. Read More »

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October 2017

Hamilton: The Man and the Musical

October 4, 2017
7:00 pm
Image of Alexander Hamilton

From his birth in the Caribbean to death in a duel, Alexander Hamilton's life was part romance, part tragedy—and the inspiration for the blockbuster Broadway musical. Hamilton biographer Willard Sterne Randall discusses the man and the musical, with excerpts from its score. Read More »

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November 2017

The Voyage of the St. Louis and American Refugee Policy

November 1, 2017
7:00 pm
Image of two women on the St. Louis

Keene State professor Paul Vincent tells the story of the 1939 voyage of the St. Louis, which carried mostly Jewish refugees fleeing Germany. Turned away by Havana, despite holding Cuban landing permits, the ship sailed for the US, where passengers were also denied entry. Vincent discusses the event in the context of the history of US immigration policy. Read More »

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December 2017

Luther 101: The Man, The Legacy

December 6, 2017
7:00 pm
Image of Martin Luther

On the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s posting his Ninety-five Theses, Dartmouth Professor of German Studies Irene Kacandes discusses Luther’s life, the unfolding of historical events in light of his teachings, and some lasting legacies of the revolution he started. Read More »

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January 2018

Empire and Aftermath in Classical Greece

January 3, 2018
7:00 pm
Image of the Parthenon in sunlight

The ancient Greek world produced two great imperial powers: Sparta and Athens. Middlebury Professor of Classics Jane Chaplin considers the different political systems of the two states, what kind of imperialism they practiced, what happened when their empires ended, and whether their experience has any relevance for us. Read More »

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March 2018

*CANCELLED* Celebrating E. B. White

March 14, 2018
7:00 pm
Image of EB White with dog

From Charlotte’s Web to his exquisite essays in The New Yorker, E.B. White remains the master’s master of elegant prose, sophisticated wit, and graceful irreverence. Read More »

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May 2018

Roots of Our Geographic and Political Divide

May 2, 2018
7:00 pm

Pulitzer-winning historian David Hackett Fischer explains the astonishing tenacity, even in our multicultural nation, of the social and political cultures that different early British immigrant groups brought to different regions—cultures that underlie our fractured political landscape today. Read More »

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October 2018

When Journalism Becomes Advocacy

October 3, 2018
7:00 pm
Image of female reporter holding microphone

Journalist Carroll Bogert, president of the Marshall Project, offers a unique perspective on the line separating the media from activists, and considers what we gain, and what we lose, when journalism takes an obvious stand. Read More »

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November 2018

Celebrating E. B. White

November 7, 2018
7:00 pm
Image of EB White with dog

From Charlotte’s Web to his exquisite essays in The New Yorker, E.B. White remains the master’s master of elegant prose, sophisticated wit, and graceful irreverence. Read More »

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December 2018

Robert Penn Warren’s Timeless All the King’s Men

December 5, 2018
7:00 pm
Image of Huey Long

Warren’s 1947 Pulitzer-winning novel chronicles the rise and reign of politician Willie Stark—based on Louisiana governor and senator Huey Long—who stirs class resentments and mesmerizes crowds. Middlebury professor Deborah Evans examines how the novel addresses the moral challenges of balancing populist desires with the lure of personal power and fame. Read More »

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January 2019

Music of the Late 1960s: Social Upheaval in Song

January 2, 2019
7:00 pm
Image of Jimi Hendrix

Music historian David Tibbs shares and discusses music from this turbulent era and explores how its songs helped bring revolution into our living rooms. Read More »

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March 2019

What Does Emerson’s Essay on “Self-Reliance” Mean?

March 6, 2019
7:00 pm
Image of man with clouds and mountains

Emerson's "Self-Reliance" draws many more readers than his other works. The very idea of self-reliance is central to how many Americans define both themselves and our culture. But, as Amherst College professor Barry O’Connell explains, Emerson plays with the meaning of the term until he finally dismisses it altogether. What, then, are we to make of the essay? Read More »

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April 2019

Life in the Studio

April 3, 2019
7:00 pm
Image of cartoon drawing of an artist

David Macaulay, award-winning author and illustrator of Castle, Cathedral, and The Way We Work, discusses current projects and challenges. Read More »

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*RESCHEDULED* “There is Nothing Either Good or Bad, But Thinking Makes It So.”

April 17, 2019
7:00 pm

Is this famous quotation from Hamlet true? Catherine A. Sanderson, Amherst College professor and author of "The Positive Shift," outlines the significant difference we can make in our daily lives simply by adjusting our outlook. Read More »

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May 2019

Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Revisited

May 1, 2019
7:00 pm
Image of Lincoln Memorial

Historians rank Abraham Lincoln’s majestic second inaugural address as one of the greatest political orations in American history. But at the time, the speech generated entirely partisan responses even as the Civil War headed toward Union victory. Preeminent Lincoln biographer Harold Holzer revisits the unforgettable day of March 4, 1865. Read More »

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September 2019

Wolf Peaches, Poisoned Peas, and Madame Pompadour’s Underwear: The Surprising History of Common Garden Vegetables

September 19, 2019
1:00 pm
Image of garden vegetables

Common garden vegetables have long and fascinating histories. Science and history writer Rebecca Rupp will discuss the stories behind many of our favorites. Read More »

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November 2019

Let Me Ask You This

November 6, 2019
7:00 pm

Longtime host of VPR's Vermont Edition Jane Lindholm shares some of her favorite interviews and behind-the-scenes moments from her career in public radio. Read More »

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December 2019

Reading the Rails: Artists Imagine the Underground Railroad

December 4, 2019
7:00 pm

Although historians have illuminated much of the mystery of the Underground Railroad, Middlebury professor Will Nash explores how contemporary artists and commentators use romanticized versions of the story to map new “Underground Railroads” and reflect cultural moments. Read More »

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January 2020

Reinventing the Family Home

January 8
7:00 pm

Middlebury College professor Erin Sassin examines how American reformers and homeowners have, in pursuit of “the simple life,” attempted to reinvent the form and idea of the single-family home, from farmhouses and communal experiments to the current tiny house phenomenon. Read More »

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February 2020

Little Kids, Big Impact

February 5
7:00 pm
Kids hands with blocks

For kids, the benefits of early education are obvious: 90% of the brain develops by age five. But the impact goes beyond just children; access to early education is Vermont’s most significant social and economic opportunity. Aly Richards, CEO of Let’s Grow Kids, discusses ways that early education both helps kids and strengthens communities. Read More »

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March 2020

Adventures in Looking at Art

March 4
7:00 pm

Artists invest considerable energy to give outward form to their inner voice. Mara Williams, curator of the Brattleboro Museum, leads an interactive exploration into how texture, palette, patina, and other elements bring to life several works of contemporary art. Read More »

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May 2020

**POSTPONED** Einstein in a Nutshell

Image of Albert Einstein

Einstein’s most famous contribution to science—his theory of relativity—is based on an idea so simple it can be stated in one sentence. Yet from that simple idea, explains Middlebury professor Richard Wolfson, follow conclusions that have revolutionized our notions of space, time, and causality. Read More »

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October 2020

*DIGITAL* Busting Out of the Ivory Tower: From Anthropology to Writing and Art

October 7
7:00 pm
Homecoming by Dana Walrath

Dementia. Genocide. Mental Illness. The atomic bomb. These may be rich subjects for academics, but most of us turn away from such topics. Yet writer, artist, and anthropologist Dana Walrath focuses on these themes in her creative work, finding hope, insight, and even laughter in the most unexpected places. (Pre-registration required.) Read More »

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