Frederick Douglass and Beyond

Community conversations about race and racism.

Frederick Douglass and Beyond

Please note: Vermont Humanities is currently focusing on contemporary issues of race and racism in the United States. Read our statement on the death of George Floyd and browse our growing list of opportunities to help

While Frederick Douglass and his writings remain an important part of the history of race and racism in the United States, we will no longer be sponsoring stand-alone “Reading Frederick Douglass” programs as we have done over the last five years. Community feedback demonstrates that Vermonters are ready to go deeper and want to engage in change-making conversations about the impact of racism on Black communities and communities of color, both in Vermont and across the United States. 

While reading Frederick Douglass’ work is a powerful experience for many, it can only be one piece of the long overdue conversations that our communities need to have. We hope that we can be a positive contributor to the conversation. Please visit our digital programs page to see the latest programming or browse the list below of recent virtual programs addressing these themes.

We thank you for your engagement.

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