Digital Programs

Podcasts, videos, and other online resources.

Featured Content

Join poet Sarah Audsley in a video recorded at the Taconic Mountains Ramble in Hubbardton Vermont for the latest installment of Words in the Woods. Sarah reads six poems from her manuscript-in-progress, and reflects with Vermont Humanities staffers Rachel Edens and Sahra Ali on the power of place and the influence of identity.

Digital Programs

Jane Lindholm at microphone

First Wednesdays Videos

Recorded talks from our free public lecture series, from 2016 through the 2020-2021 season. View talks.

Image of Before Your Time logo

Before Your Time Podcast Series

Exploring Vermont’s history, one object at a time. Produced with the Vermont Historical Society. See list of episodes.

The Portable Humanist logo

The Portable Humanist Podcast Series

Listen to Vermont Humanities talks and learn when you’re on the go. View list of episodes.

Democracy is a We, Not a Them cartoon

Fall Conference Recorded Sessions

Videos from our free 2020 Fall Conference “Democracy 20/20.” View talks.

Recent Digital Posts

Let’s Talk Antiracism

Let’s Talk Antiracism

Dr. Laura Jiménez joins Vermont State Librarian Jason Broughton to examine ways to lead effective discussions centered on diversity and antiracism.

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We Are Still Here

We Are Still Here

Father and son storytellers and musicians Joseph and Jesse Bruchac of the Nulhegan Abenaki Nation use drum, flute, rattle, and vocals to address the continued presence and vibrant cultural heritage of the Wabanaki Nations of Ndakinna.

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Cannabis: Medical Uses and Public Safety

Cannabis: Medical Uses and Public Safety

UVM Pharmacology professor Dr. Karen Lounsbury reviews the history of cannabis and the medicinal products derived from it, as well as the benefits, risks, and the therapeutic potential of medical cannabis.

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The Legacy of Nicholas Black Elk

The Legacy of Nicholas Black Elk

Historian Damian Costello explores the life of the man behind the famous book Black Elk Speaks. Nicholas Black Elk’s Lakota philosophy can help us see the natural world as a unified whole, and his continued hope amidst great tragedy can inform how we approach contemporary crises.

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Telling Disability Stories: Histories, Representations, and Imaginations

Telling Disability Stories: Histories, Representations, and Imaginations

(Transcript and slides only.) The meaning of “disability” shifts across time, places, and cultures. In spotlighting stories centered on disabled people, Middlebury professor Susan Burch draws on history, popular media representations, and inclusive design practices to reimagine our past, present, and possible future.

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Making Rumble Strip in My Closet

Making Rumble Strip in My Closet

Podcaster Erica Heilman discusses her interview process and shares stories from her “Rumble Strip” podcast, which she describes as “extraordinary conversations with ordinary people. Or that’s the goal.”

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Martin Luther King Jr. Remembrance Ceremony 2021

Martin Luther King Jr. Remembrance Ceremony 2021

Tim Wise, a prominent anti-racist writer and educator gave this keynote presentation on January 17 for the Greater Burlington Multicultural Resource Center at the St. Joseph’s Cathedral in Burlington as part of a remembrance of the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Qualities of “Mercy?”

Qualities of “Mercy?”

In 2020, the “Get Thee to the Funnery” Shakespeare camp took on the controversial Shakespeare play, “Merchant of Venice” and used it to confront prejudice and hate speech, deal with the pandemic lockdown, and examine the Black Lives Matter movement.

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Life on the Other Border: Farmworkers and Food Justice in Vermont

Life on the Other Border: Farmworkers and Food Justice in Vermont

Those who put food on our tables disproportionately experience food insecurity in their own homes. UVM professor Teresa Mares illuminates the many ways Latinx farm workers in Vermont sustain themselves and their families while also serving as the backbone of the state’s agricultural economy.

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Winslow Homer and the Poetics of Place

Winslow Homer and the Poetics of Place

The painter Winslow Homer (1836-1910) occupies an unusual and pivotal place in the history of American art. Thomas Denenberg, director of the Shelburne Museum, sketches Homer’s long and productive career, focusing on how he bridged the sentimental culture of the nineteenth century with the visual culture of the modern era.

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