Vermont Humanities

Upcoming Events

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Browse this complete list of our upcoming digital and in-person events. Visit the Attend page to find links to events that are sorted by program.

Upcoming Events

Image of 1893 bicycle club
Live Event

Of Wheelmen, The New Woman, and Good Roads: Bicycling in Vermont, 1880-1920

During the 1890s, enthusiasm exploded statewide as bicycles became safer, women took to the wheel, roads improved, and retailers developed novel advertising techniques to draw in buyers. By 1920, popular interest in bicycles had waned, but it had not just been a fad: the bicycle was tied to important changes in industrial production, consumerism, new road policies and regulations, gender relations, and new cultural ideas about auto-mobility and effortless speed.

Live Event

Vermont Reads: Make Paper Lanterns with Radiate Art Space

Richmond Free Library and Radiate Art Space are excited to offer a special craft featuring this year’s Vermont Reads book, Last Night at the Telegraph Club.
Join us to create your own paper lantern like Lily and her family would have lit at the Lantern Festival concluding their Lunar New Year celebration.

Marquee with "The World is Temporarily Closed" written on it
Live Event

Pandemics, Surreal and the Real

The Covid-19 pandemic has been devastating for all of us, as we grieve, struggle with separation, and combat the loneliness we collectively feel. This series created by the Quechee Library confronts this difficult time by looking at it through fiction. The series is comprised of two novellas and a collection of 23 short stories.

Computers taped off to enforce social distancing during the SARS-Coronavirus-2 pandemic at the small local public library, that is located in the Groninger city of Winschoten, Oldambt.
Hybrid Event

Every Problem Is Now a Technology Problem

The Covid Era created new challenges (and opportunities!) for technology education work. Every problem turned into a technology problem, and issues of access and the digital divide became very imposing, very rapidly. What made a difference? Library technologist and author Jessamyn West talks about the Vermont public library response.

Image of woman at lathe
Live Event

Rosie’s Mom: Forgotten Women of the First World War

One hundred years ago, a full generation before Rosie the Riveter, women rolled up their sleeves and entered war industries where they had never been welcome before. They ran powerful machinery, learned new skills, and faced the sullen hostility of the men in the shops.

In this illustrated lecture, historian Carrie Brown reveals their courage and their hard work, and explores how these women helped shape the work that their more famous daughters would do in the next World War.

Image of Vermont field in winter
Live Event

Vermont, 1800 and Froze to Death: The Cold Year of 1816

1816 has long been known as the year without summer. Vermonters still call it “1800 and Froze to Death,” a year of frosts every month, dark skies, and mysterious lights that caused a widespread belief that a higher power was displeased. In this talk, historian Howard Coffin includes scores of anecdotes on the dark year of failed crops, scarce food, and religious revival.

Image of a mountain scene
Live Event

The Hills of Home: Mountains and Identity in Vermont History

Vermonters have strong ideas about the importance of their mountain topography. Where did our pride in Vermont’s landscape come from, and why is it that we see our shared identity as rooted in the land? This lecture by historian Jill Mudgett is timely and relevant in its relationship to current interdisciplinary scholarship, and offers us tools to understand the origins and meaning of our own strongly-held attachments to the Vermont landscape.

Bill Mares and friend with beer
Live Event

From Homebrew to the House of Fermentology

Bill Mares began making his own beer 45 years ago, when home brewing was illegal and there were no microbreweries in America. In this presentation, he offers a short history of beer itself and discusses Vermont’s small but significant contribution to the American beer revolution.

black and white image of Mary Martin running with children in the Sound of Music
Hybrid Event

My Day in the Hills: The Story, Songs, and Soul of The Sound of Music

Why do Vermonters feel such a strong attachment to the story of the von Trapp family and, subsequently, to The Sound of Music? Educator and conductor Stefanie Weigand explores why this story draws us in and holds our attention, even though the events that formed the basis of the show and film took place decades ago and thousands of miles away.

Live Event

Vermont Book Awards: A Celebration of Vermont Writers

Please join us on Saturday, May 4, 2024, at 7:00pm at the Vermont College of Fine Arts in Montpelier for this year’s Vermont Book Award celebration! The Vermont Book Awards are hosted by the Vermont College of Fine Arts, the Vermont Department of Libraries, and Vermont Humanities.

Statue of Phillis Wheatley
Live Event

Lucy Terry Prince: Witness, Voice, and Poetics within the American Tradition

Beginning with Vermonter Lucy Terry Prince, the first known African American poet in the U.S., poet Shanta Lee Gander explores creative lineage within poetics. Surveying the work of Phillis Wheatley, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Rita Dove, and slam poet Dominique Christina, Gander considers the poetic arc from the past to the modern moment.

young girl blowing a large bubble
Hybrid Event

The Play Instinct: Have You Lost Yours?

Playfulness is the foundation for strengthening relationships and building resilient communities. In order to understanding this, we must know the intrinsic value of play and its potential for deepening our connection to self and others. In this session, Lisa Guerrero invites participants to reconnect to their natural play instinct and puts forth a passionate invitation to prioritize play.

Image of older man reading with two boys
Live Event

American Stories Across the Generations: The Giver

This series focuses on the theme of relationships between children and older adults. This event will focus on the book The Giver by Lois Lowry.

Black and white photo from Vermont Lesbian and Gay Pride march in 1983
Live Event

Stories from the Vermont Queer Archives

Objects such as banners, T-shirts, and buttons in the Vermont Queer Archives at the Pride Center of Vermont reflect currents and changes in the lives of Vermont’s LGBTQ+ community. Meg Tamulonis, volunteer curator of the Archives, discusses how these objects mark various milestones, from Pride events to legal rulings, and considers why some parts of the queer community aren’t well-represented in the Archives.

Image of woman
Live Event

Vermont Women and the Civil War

Historian Howard Coffin explains, with nearly 35,000 of the state’s able-bodied men at war, how women took on farming, worked in factories, served as nurses in the state’s military hospitals, and more. And at least one Vermont woman appears to have secretly enlisted and fought in a Vermont regiment!

Drawing from letters and diaries, Coffin tells their story in their own words, describe life during the Civil War in the Green Mountain State.

Image of painting of Virginia Woolf
Hybrid Event

Based on a Real Life: Angle of Repose

One biography each year is awarded a Pulitzer Prize, but these character studies wouldn’t count – each is a Pulitzer-winning work of fiction, with portions based on one person’s real life story. Wallace Stegner’s Pultizer Prize-winning novel Angle of Repose is a story of discovery—personal, historical, and geographical.

purple QTPIE logo with rainbow letter for queer and trans people in education
Hybrid Event

The Ecology of Queer and Trans People in Education

UVM professor Jay Garvey describes why it’s important to boost educational opportunities for queer and trans students and educators. Taking an ecological lens, Garvey will review legislative priorities and institutional approaches that could help queer and trans people succeed in secondary and postsecondary education.

Silhouette pen-and-ink drawing of the historical lesbian couple Charity and Sylvia
Live Event

Comics and Queerness in Vermont and Beyond

Vermont Cartoonist Laureate Tillie Walden presents a look at the intersection of indie comics with queer identity through her many graphic novels—from science fiction to memoir to historical retelling. Explore process and power through visual narrative and learn why comics are relevant to Vermonters and beyond.

Image of painting of medieval kitchen helpers
Live Event

Soup to Nuts: An Eccentric History of Food

The history of what and how we eat encompasses everything from the prehistoric mammoth luau to the medieval banquet to the modern three squares a day. Find out about the rocky evolution of table manners, the not-so-welcome invention of the fork, the awful advent of portable soup, and the surprising benefits of family dinners – plus some catchy info on seasonal foods.

Image of Daisy Turner
Live Event

Daisy Turner’s Kin

Vermont folklorist Jane Beck shares the story of the Turner family, a multigenerational saga spanning two centuries, played out across three continents. The saga was related to Jane Beck by Daisy Turner, who had listened to her father, Alec Turner, recount stories of the family past.

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Vermont Humanities*** December 1, 2021