Vermont Humanities

Newport First Wednesdays

A person in a kayak rowing on a lake in front of a rock face with green folaige on it
First Wednesdays

Venue: Goodrich Memorial Library

202 Main Street, Newport
Library phone: (802) 334-7902
Library website
Directions to the library

Newport First Wednesdays Events

Two men stand in front of a wooden frame in matching orange patterned shirts, holding woodwind instruments
Live Event

Our Native Land

Father and son storytellers and musicians Joseph and Jesse Bruchac of the Nulhegan Abenaki Nation use traditional music, storytelling, and the Abenaki language to describe the continuing connection of their people to Ndakinna (our land.) They share greeting and friendship songs and tell stories that relate to the creation of the place now called Vermont. 

Man standing in town meeting in Norman Rockwell's "Freedom of Speech" painting
Live Event

Slow Democracy and the Power of Community

Author and advocate Susan Clark explains the Slow Democracy movement in which ordinary people mobilize to find local solutions to local problems. In the process some find they can bridge the “us/them” divide so prevalent in our national politics today. Clark shares stories of democratic community building from across the nation, and gives practical tips for breaking down barriers.

The cover of Revolution in our Time, featuring images from the black power movement set in a black power fist with an orange background
Live Event

Revolution in Our Time

National Book Award finalist Kekla Magoon discusses her award-winning nonfiction book, Revolution in Our Time: The Black Panther Party’s Promise to the People. The Vermont author also considers the importance of reading as a tool for social change, and our individual and collective power to transform our communities.  

Cover of The People's Tongue with red and blue like the United States flag
Digital Event

The People’s Tongue: Americans and the English Language

Longtime First Wednesdays favorite Ilan Stavans discusses his new book, an anthology that tells the story of how the English language has been transformed in the United States. The People’s Tongue features essays, letters, poems, songs, speeches, stories, jeremiads, manifestos, and decrees across history, from Sojourner Truth and Abraham Lincoln to Henry Roth and Zora Neale Hurston and beyond.

Live Event

From Red State to Blue State: Vermont’s Political Transformation

For 100 years—from the 1850s to the 1950s—Vermont was the most Republican state in the nation. But today it is the most Democratic. Journalist Chris Graff considers some factors behind the switch from “red to blue,” including interstate highways, the arrival of IBM in Vermont, and the reapportionment of the Vermont House. 

image of the city of Berlin drawn by Jason Lutes
Live Event

Building Berlin: the Genesis of a Graphic Novel

The graphic novel Berlin by Jason Lutes depicts life during the rise of fascism in post-WWI Germany. Lutes discusses his development as a cartoonist—with inspiration from William Faulkner to Dungeons & Dragons, Wim Wenders to Star Wars—that culminated in the creation of a book The Guardian called “a modern classic.”

Statewide Underwriters: The Institute of Museum & Library Services through the Vermont Department of Libraries.

Series Underwriter: Peter Gilbert Endowment Fund

Program Underwriters: Anne Commire Fund for Women in the Humanities; Federation of State Humanities Councils and funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; Passumpsic Savings Bank-Member FDIC, Peter Gilbert Endowment Fund

Printed Newport First Wednesdays brochure

We’ll share the PDF of the Newport First Wednesdays talks by September 21.

Vermont Humanities*** November 21, 2014