Vermont Humanities

Brattleboro First Wednesdays

A person in a kayak rowing on a lake in front of a rock face with green folaige on it
First Wednesdays

Venue: Brooks Memorial Library

224 Main Street, Brattleboro
Library phone: (802) 254-5290
Library website
Directions to the library

Brattleboro First Wednesdays Talks

A colorful graffito of Miles Davis playing trumpet with bright colors and shapes surrounding him
Live Event

The Electric Period of Miles Davis

The ever-changing music that Miles Davis recorded from 1969 to 1975 angered and bewildered many critics and fans, who accused the trumpeter of “selling out.” Jazz archivist and poet Reuben Jackson shares how recordings from Davis’ “Electric Period”—including 1974’s Get Up With It—prove otherwise. 

A drawing of a Civil War soldier standing on a cold field in black and white
Live Event

Drawing Community: Creating Comics from Shared Stories

Using examples from his work with the Vermont Reads 2022 book The Most Costly Journey (El Viaje Más Caro) and his Civil War Diary of Freeman Colby series, cartoonist Marek Bennett explores how the act of cartooning can help us forge connections, build empathy, and challenge set definitions of identity and belonging. 

Man in black jacket standing in front of a store in night time
Live Event

Pandemic Architecture: Two Centuries of Disease and Design

Public health crises have prompted many changes to the buildings, skylines, and streetscapes of our cities. Champlain College professor David Mills explores two centuries’ worth of alterations to the built environment made in pursuit of health and wellbeing, from modern to postmodern and beyond. 

a volunteer conservationist hold hula hoops and stands in a forest wearing a mask
Digital Event

Biodiversity, Conservation, and Civic Participation in Paraguay

South America’s Atlantic Forest is one of the most diverse ecosystems on the planet. Cristian Fretes Ojeda, technical trainer for Peace Corps Paraguay, discusses how civic participation is leading the effort to conserve crucial natural areas like the Atlantic Forest and the Gran Chaco, which span several South American countries. 

The cover of Revolution in our Time, featuring images from the black power movement set in a black power fist with an orange background
Live Event

Revolution in Our Time

National Book Award finalist Kekla Magoon discusses her award-winning nonfiction book, Revolution in Our Time: The Black Panther Party’s Promise to the People. The Vermont author also considers the importance of reading as a tool for social change, and our individual and collective power to transform our communities.  

Fast food worker with fried chicken on shelves
Live Event

We Are All Fast Food Workers Now

Labor historian Annelise Orleck provides a close look at globalization and its costs from the perspective of low-wage workers themselves—berry pickers, fast food servers, garment workers, cashiers, hotel housekeepers, home health care aides, and even adjunct professors—who are fighting for respect, safety, and a living wage.

Statewide Underwriters: The Institute of Museum & Library Services through the Vermont Department of Libraries

Series Underwriter: Chroma Technology Corp.

Program Underwriters: Anne Commire Fund for Women in the Humanities; Peter Gilbert Endowment Fund

Library Sponsors: Friends of the Brooks Memorial Library

Printed Brattleboro First Wednesdays brochure

We’ll share the PDF of the Brattleboro First Wednesdays talks by September 21.

 

Vermont Humanities*** November 20, 2014