The cover of Revolution in our Time, featuring images from the black power movement set in a black power fist with an orange background
Live Event

Revolution in Our Time

National Book Award finalist Kekla Magoon discusses her award-winning nonfiction book, Revolution in Our Time: The Black Panther Party’s Promise to the People. The Vermont author also considers the importance of reading as a tool for social change, and our individual and collective power to transform our communities.  

painting by George Inness of spring blossoms on trees with a house int he bacground and a figure walking through a field
Live Event

Agriculture and Abolition: The Politics of 19th Century Landscape Painting

In his landmark 1864 book, “Man and Nature,” George Perkins Marsh drew distinctions between the “free” landscapes of the prosperous North and the Southern practice of cultivating cotton and tobacco with slave labor. Reviewing Marsh’s ideas, along with the works of Hudson River School artists and their Southern counterparts, Smithsonian curator Eleanor Jones Harvey explores how images of agriculture served abolitionist politics in the 19th century. 

Washing clothes at rear of sharecropper's cabin. Transylvania, Louisiana
Live Event

In Goldleana’s Hands: Black Women and Labor Choices in North Louisiana in 1950s

Jolivette Anderson-Douoning shares the lived experience of Mrs. Goldleana, whose story illuminates the role Black women played as laborers in the Louisiana cotton and timber industries—and in their own families—in the 1940s and 50s. She also highlights geographical differences in Black migration: some left the South while others remained. 

Three stones standing in sand, one with "haiku" painted on it in black letters
Live Event

The Art of the Haiku

Poet Keiselim (Keysi) Montás discusses how to read the traditional Japanese poetic form of haiku, illustrated with works from his haiku collection, Like Water.

Live Event

From Red State to Blue State: Vermont’s Political Transformation

For 100 years—from the 1850s to the 1950s—Vermont was the most Republican state in the nation. But today it is the most Democratic. Journalist Chris Graff considers some factors behind the switch from “red to blue,” including interstate highways, the arrival of IBM in Vermont, and the reapportionment of the Vermont House. 

a path leads out on to a rock ledge that overlooks a bay or ocean at sunset
Live Event

Arribada- A Novel

Author and Middlebury professor Gloria Estela Gonzalez Zenteno discusses her new novel Arribada, about a woman pushed to confront her role in environmental and social injustice, and a well-to-do family’s realization that their comfortable position rests on crimes against the natural world, their town, and their loved ones. 

A character stretches out while sitting on the floor next to a bicycle pump and a pair of skis
Live Event

The Secret to Superhuman Strength 

Celebrated cartoonist Alison Bechdel discusses her work as an illustrator and memoirist, including her most recent book, The Secret to Superhuman Strength, a graphic memoir about her lifelong love affair with exercise that won the 2021 Vermont Book Award. 

two chairs sit on a deck overlooking the water, one chair is overturned
Live Event

Poetry Reflections with Richard Blanco

Selected by President Obama as the fifth inaugural poet in US history, Richard Blanco is the first Latino, immigrant, and gay person to serve in such a role. Born in Madrid to Cuban exile parents and raised in Miami, the negotiation of cultural identity characterizes his four collections of poetry.  

Musician Bob Marley holding a guitar and pointing skyward during a concert.
Live Event

Rebel Music: Afro-Caribbean Music and Political Thought

Middlebury College professor Kemi Fuentes-George traces the development of pan-African political theory in the early 20th century and discusses how Afro Caribbean “rebel music” helped these ideas challenge established assumptions about nonwhite people and global relations. 

An animal-decorated youth wheelchair sits on a beach at low tide
Digital Event

A History of Disability

Disability, as part of the human condition, has always been with us. But considering disability to be negative is a new concept, shaped by recent history. Professor of philosophy, author, and disability activist Patrick Standen unravels the complicated, fascinating, and controversial history of the concept of disability.

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