two chairs sit on a deck overlooking the water, one chair is overturned
Live Event

Poetry Reflections with Richard Blanco

Selected by President Obama as the fifth inaugural poet in US history, Richard Blanco is the first Latino, immigrant, and gay person to serve in such a role. Born in Madrid to Cuban exile parents and raised in Miami, the negotiation of cultural identity characterizes his four collections of poetry.  

Musician Bob Marley holding a guitar and pointing skyward during a concert.
Live Event

Rebel Music: Afro-Caribbean Music and Political Thought

Middlebury College professor Kemi Fuentes-George traces the development of pan-African political theory in the early 20th century and discusses how Afro Caribbean “rebel music” helped these ideas challenge established assumptions about nonwhite people and global relations. 

An animal-decorated youth wheelchair sits on a beach at low tide
Digital Event

A History of Disability

Disability, as part of the human condition, has always been with us. But considering disability to be negative is a new concept, shaped by recent history. Professor of philosophy, author, and disability activist Patrick Standen unravels the complicated, fascinating, and controversial history of the concept of disability.

Fast food worker with fried chicken on shelves
Live Event

We Are All Fast Food Workers Now

Labor historian Annelise Orleck provides a close look at globalization and its costs from the perspective of low-wage workers themselves—berry pickers, fast food servers, garment workers, cashiers, hotel housekeepers, home health care aides, and even adjunct professors—who are fighting for respect, safety, and a living wage.

River in Yosemite National Park
Live Event

Civil War, Emancipation, Reconstruction and America’s National Parks

Central Park and Yosemite Valley became public parks during the tumultuous years before and during the Civil War. UVM historian and former National Park Service superintendent Rolf Diamant explains how anti-slavery activism, war, and the remaking of the federal government gave rise to the American public park and the very concept of national parks.

A vintage cycling magazine ad in sepia
Live Event

When the Bicycle Came to Vermont

UVM professor Luis Vivanco explores the fascinating early history of the bicycle in Vermont, an invention that generated widespread curiosity when it arrived here in the 1880s. Over the next decade, enthusiasm exploded statewide as bicycles became safer, women took to the wheel, roads improved, and retailers developed novel advertising techniques to draw in buyers.

Young woman in green jacket pointing in the woods while holding binoculars
Live Event

Birding Her-story: The Lost Legacy of Women in Ornithology

“Bird Diva” Bridget Butler believes that there’s a bit of bias in the birding world when it comes to females. In this presentation, she examines new scientific studies on female birds, shares stories of the “Mothers of Ornithology,” and reflects on current research about gender and birding.

a protester holds a rainblow flag that says we the people on a NYC street
Live Event

Dare Not Speak: Autocrats and the Campaign to Silence LGBTQI+ Communities

Michael Bosia, a leading scholar on global trans- and homophobia, argues that manufactured “LGBTQI+ peril” helps obscure growing social inequality and the policy failures of politicians who have turned their backs on democratic accountability. In this talk, Bosia focuses on laws and rhetoric that target LGBTQI+ youth, teachers, and allies as part of a global anti-democratic effort.

image of the city of Berlin drawn by Jason Lutes
Live Event

Building Berlin: the Genesis of a Graphic Novel

The graphic novel Berlin by Jason Lutes depicts life during the rise of fascism in post-WWI Germany. Lutes discusses his development as a cartoonist—with inspiration from William Faulkner to Dungeons & Dragons, Wim Wenders to Star Wars—that culminated in the creation of a book The Guardian called “a modern classic.”

a farm worker walks through a field masked carrying a catd and a box
Live Event

Essential Work in the Food System: Imagining a Better Future

Consumers are increasingly concerned with what goes into their food and demand a healthier and more ecologically sustainable food system. However, labor is rarely part of the so-called sustainable food discussion. Dr. Mares shares her ongoing research on food and farmworkers, focusing both on local labor concerns in the dairy industry and national conversations about essential work.

a black and white illustration of fingers with words dancing along the sides of them and a spiral at the tip of the index finger
Live Event

Healing Through Art 

Author and artist Dana Walrath practices a border-crossing blend of creative writing, comics, art, and anthropology. In this lecture, she explores the work that went into creating projects such as Aliceheimer’s, a graphic memoir about her mother’s dementia journey, and considers the last impacting of this type of storytelling. 

Middle-aged man in World War Two uniform with helmet
Live Event

War Reenactors: Who Gets to Tell History?

Artist Ed Gendron shares and discusses images from his photo project about World War II reenactors in the United States. Gendron later produced Playing Soldier, a feature-length documentary on the same topic. “The re-enactors assert that ‘history is a personal thing,’ says Gendron. “And for them, it may be quite true.”

A woman holds a green sign that reads ERA YES at a Women's March in LA in 2019
Digital Event

Thriving Communities: The Winding VT Road to Abolition and Women’s Rights 

Ashley Messier leads this group discussion on how to achieve thriving communities while recognizing the ongoing marginalization of women and the continued use of punishment in the criminal legal system.