Image of Vermont forest in winter
Live Event

Murder in the Vermont Woods: A Story About Race, Class, and Gender in the 19th Century

Historian Jill Mudgett tells the story of an Indigenous man from southern New England who came to central Vermont during the late 19th century and was the victim of a murder. Recreating community connections in a rural Vermont hill town, this story is about poverty, racism, disability, and gendered violence against women, but is also an account of Indigenous movement and choice despite great obstacles.

A drone sits in a hangar looking out on a desert and mountain as a man in a jumpsuit walks towards it.
Hybrid Event

Dirty Work with Author Eyal Press

Journalist Eyal Press discusses his reporting for his award-winning book “Dirty Work: Essential Jobs and the Hidden Toll of Inequality in America” which examines the morally troubling jobs that society tacitly condones, and the hidden class of workers who do them.

Three people sitting on a wooden platform, one on left playing a hand drum while the two on right sing
Live Event

Garifuna Collective: Keeping Culture Alive

In honor of Indigenous Peoples Day (October 10), the Chandler Center for the Arts hosts a conversation with members of the internationally renowned Garifuna Collective. They’ll relate stories about their ancestors and the displacement of the Garifuna people to Honduras and Belize.

Illustration of a woman walking across a farm wearing a winter coat.
Live Event

Non-Fiction Comics Festival

From science to politics, history to health care, cartooning has exploded as a legitimate medium for exploring non-fiction topics and the textures of lived experience. The first ever Non-Fiction Comics Festival will feature panel discussions, workshops, and exhibits by cartoonists who create non-fiction and autobiographical work.

Drawing of three children working under the shadow of two adults in colonial garb
Live Event

The Captive Children of Deerfield: Three Nations at War

Presenter Donna Toneatti of the Abenaki Nation of Missisquoi explores from the three angles of her own family history—French, English, and Native American—the Deerfield Massacre, which took place during the 1704 “Queen Anne’s War.”

Three young Mexican brothers wearing white and black T-shirts in a white room, each holding a box on the same fiddle
Live Event

The Villalobos Brothers in Concert

Born in Xalapa, Mexico, The Villalobos Brothers have been acclaimed as one of today’s leading contemporary Mexican ensembles. Their original compositions and arrangements masterfully fuse and celebrate the richness of Mexican folk music with the intricate harmonies of jazz and classical music.

Image of Morgan Horse
Live Event

Justin Morgan’s Horse: Making an American Myth

All Morgan horses today trace their lineage back to a single horse: a mystery stallion named Figure, owned by singing teacher Justin Morgan in the late 18th century. But who was Figure, really? What stories have people told about him in the two centuries since he lived and worked in Vermont?

Illustration of people gathered around a document to discuss civics
Live Event

Freedom and Unity Launch Party

Hosted by the Center for Cartoon Studies, this lively presentation about the making of Freedom and Unity, A Graphic Guide to Vermont Democracy will feature the cartoonists and scholars that helped create a comic book about the past, present, and potential of democracy and civics in Vermont.

Two elderly men sit in front of a white door on a red brick house while a dog watches through the window
Live Event

Migration Pathways: Stories of Yesterday and Today

Andrew Ingall, creator of the project “Warlé, Yesterday, and Today,” leads a participatory workshop inspired by the lives and legacy of Warren Kronemeyer and Leon Ingall, a Vermont couple who were entrepreneurs and civic leaders in Townshend, VT during the 1980 and 1990s.

Marquee of the Broadway show Wicked
Live Event

Follow the Yellow Brick Road: A Conversation with Gregory Maguire

In this moderated conversation, Gregory Maguire discusses his “revisionist history” of L. Frank Baum’s fantastic universe, including its ongoing relevance in a world where we too easily put people in boxes labeled “wicked” and “good.” Maguire will sign books after his talk, including the latest in his Oz series, The Oracle of Maracoor.

A green hill spotted with small colorful doors for Hobbit homes
Live Event

Tolkien and Goddess Worship 

UVM lecturer Chris Vaccaro explores J.R.R. Tolkien’s devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary and his occupation with female divinities such as Varda, Yavanna, Melian, Luthien, and Galadriel in his work. Vaccaro compares these divinities with goddesses within Greco-Roman, Celtic, and Norse mythologies and considers Tolkien’s influences. 

Two Cosplayers at the New York ComicCon in 2016 are dressed as Mr. Freeze and Black Panther and stand facing each other against a gray wall
Live Event

Diasporic Immigrant Superheroes: From Foreign to BIPOC & LGBTQ+

Middlebury College professor Enrique García reviews the American superhero genre and how it has served as a tool to disseminate utopian ideas about immigration and the American Dream. While discussing characters such as Superman, Wonder Woman, Black Panther, and La Borinqueña, García reflects on comic artists’ struggles to overcome imperial ideas of white supremacy, heteronormativity, and American exceptionalism.

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