First Wednesdays

A Humanities Lecture Series, October through May

Upcoming First Wednesdays Talks

View a list of next month’s First Wednesdays talks below. See a full list of First Wednesdays talks by date.

Wed 03

Life in the Studio

April 3
7:00 pm
David Macaulay, award-winning author and illustrator of Castle, Cathedral, and The Way We Work, discusses current projects and challenges. Read More »
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Wed 03

Poetry and Song

April 3
7:00 pm
Veteran singing ensemble, the Thetford Chamber Singers, present powerful literary texts with complex choral arrangements, including the work of Wendell Berry, Emily Dickinson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, and others. Read More »
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Wed 03

Physicists’ Dream of a Theory of Everything

April 3
7:00 pm
Theoretical physicists have long dreamt of a theory of everything that encompasses all particles of matter and their interactions. Dartmouth professor Marcelo Gleiser describes how physics and astronomy obtain knowledge of the natural world and how their limitations preclude us from ever getting to a “final” theory. Read More »
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Wed 03

Two Lives

April 3
7:00 pm
Reeve Lindbergh, daughter of aviator-authors Charles A. and Anne Morrow Lindbergh, discusses the intersection of fame and privacy as the spokesperson for one of the most famous families of the 20th century. Read More »
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Wed 03

Emily Dickinson: Poet of New England

April 3
7:00 pm
Emily Dickinson lived her entire life in Amherst, Massachusetts. One of the greatest American poets, and probably the most important woman poet of all time, she was also a quintessential New England poet. UVM professor emeritus Huck Gutman explores what Dickinson can teach us. Read More »
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Wed 03

Einstein in a Nutshell

April 3
7:00 pm
Einstein’s most famous contribution to science—his theory of relativity—is based on an idea so simple it can be stated in one sentence. Yet from that simple idea, explains Middlebury professor Richard Wolfson, follow conclusions that have revolutionized our notions of space, time, and causality. Read More »
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Wed 03

Vincent Van Gogh and the Books He Read

April 3
7:00 pm
St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, St Johnsbury
Van Gogh’s letters reveal that his paintings and drawings were inspired by his reading as well as by people, nature, and other painters’ work. Art historian Carol Berry shows the profound influence of the works of Harriet Beecher Stowe, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, and others on Van Gogh’s life and art. Read More »
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Wed 03

Slow Democracy and the Power of Neighborliness

April 3
7:00 pm
Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury
Author and advocate Susan Clark explains the Slow Democracy movement in which ordinary people mobilize to find local solutions to local problems. In the process some find they can bridge the “us-them” divide so prevalent in our national politics. Read More »
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Wed 10

Amelia

April 10
7:00 pm
Brownell Library, Essex Junction
The mysterious disappearance of Amelia Earhart in 1937 often overshadows her accomplishments as a pilot and author. Champlain College professor Nancy Nahra examines the remarkable life of the aviation legend.  Read More »
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