First Wednesdays

A Humanities Lecture Series, October through May

Brattleboro First Wednesdays

Venue: Brooks Memorial Library

224 Main Street, Brattleboro
Library phone: (802) 254-5290
Library website
Directions to the library

Printed Brattleboro First Wednesdays brochure

Download the 2017-2018 Brattleboro Schedule (PDF).

All First Wednesdays events are free and open to the public!

Wed 01

Luther and the Reformation: A 500-year Appraisal

November 1
7:00 pm
Martin Luther’s posting of the Ninety-five Theses on the cathedral door at Wittenburg five hundred years ago launched a movement that utterly transformed Western society and our notions of authority, culture, art, and tradition. Dartmouth Religion professor Randall Balmer assesses the Protestant Reformation half a millennium later. Read More »
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Wed 06

World War I and American Writers

December 6
7:00 pm
Dartmouth professor Barbara Will discusses the effect of the war on American writers, particularly Gertrude Stein, John Dos Passos, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, and T. S. Eliot, and explores how the war changed American literature and made it “modern.” Read More »
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Wed 03

An Evening with Langston Hughes

January 3, 2018
7:00 pm
In this dramatic rendition of Langston Hughes’ poems and short stories, actor and writer David Mills celebrates the life of the Harlem Renaissance writer. Read More »
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Wed 07

The Legacy of Rachel Carson

February 7, 2018
7:00 pm
Silent Spring not only launched the environmental movement but also identified fundamental problems with our relationship to nature. Dartmouth professor Nancy Jay Crumbine explores Carson’s clarity, courage, and brilliance. Read More »
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Wed 07

The Known World and the Literary Character

March 7, 2018
7:00 pm
Amherst professor Judith Frank discusses Edward P. Jones’ 2003 Pulitzer-winning novel The Known World, described as “a masterpiece that deserves a place in the American literary canon,” and considers what its unusual approach to characterization can tell us about slavery, personhood, and novel-reading. Read More »
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Wed 04

An Emerson for Our Time

April 4, 2018
7:00 pm
Drawing on Ralph Waldo Emerson’s essays "The American Scholar," "Self-Reliance," and "Experience," Amherst professor emeritus Barry O'Connell explores the many ways Emerson’s writings continue to offer insights that can make our lives more open and fruitful. Read More »
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Wed 02

Georgia O’Keeffe: A Critical Look

May 2, 2018
7:00 pm
Georgia O'Keeffe lived 99 years and produced over 2,000 works in her 75-year career. James Maroney, the former Head of American Paintings at both Sotheby's and Christie's in New York who conducted her estate appraisal after her death, presents a critical evaluation of her best work. Statewide underwriters: Photo: Georgia O'Keeffe, 1918, by Alfred Stieglitz Read More »
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