First Wednesdays

A Humanities Lecture Series, October through May

First Wednesdays

This eclectic lecture series offers talks in nine towns on the first Wednesday of the month, October through May. Topics are varied, timely, timeless, thought-provoking, and fun.

All First Wednesdays talks are free and open to the public, and are held at libraries and other venues in each host community.

Image of four First Wednesdays talks

Upcoming First Wednesdays Talks

Statewide Underwriters

Underwriter Logos

Image of the Alma Gibbs Donchain Foundation logo Image of the Windham Foundation logo Image of Vermont Department of Libraries logo Image of Institute of Museum and Library Services logo

The First Wednesdays talks that are supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in partnership with the Pulitzer Prizes are part of the “Democracy and the Informed Citizen” Initiative, which is administered by the Federation of State Humanities Councils. The initiative seeks to deepen the public’s knowledge and appreciation of the vital connections between democracy, the humanities, journalism, and an informed citizenry.

Watch Recorded First Wednesdays Talks

Why did Salinger write novels that sound like plays, begging to be acted out? Yale Professor of English and Dean of Humanities Amy Hungerford explores the voices and dramas of the Glass family at the heart of Salinger’s work and his themes of love, religion, and the power of human performance.

This video was recorded at the Norwich Congregational Church on December 6, 2017.

See more recorded 2017-2018 First Wednesdays talks.