Vermont Humanities

Reflections on Writing and Illustration

First Wednesdays

Vermonter Jason Chin has written and illustrated many acclaimed children’s books, including Grand Canyon, Redwoods, and Your Place in the Universe. He received the 2022 Caldecott Medal for illustrating Watercress by Andrea Wang. In this presentation at The Brownell Libary on October 5, 2022, he describes his passion for nature, science, and art,  and discusses the impact of his work with young people.

About Jason Chin

Jason Chin grew up in a small town in New Hampshire that happened to be home to Caldecott medalist Trina Schart Hyman. They met when he was a teenager, and she became his mentor and guided him as he pursued a career in the arts. In 2009 Jason published Redwoods, his first book as both author and illustrator. While researching his books, he’s gone swimming with sharks, explored lava fields, and camped with scorpions at the bottom of the Grand Canyon.

Image by Jason Chin.

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Vermont Humanities*** October 5, 2022