Vermont Humanities

Outsiders: Those Who Fell Outside the Cultural Norm

Pawlet Public Library 141 School St, Pawlet, VT, United States

This discussion series examines the treatment of populations outside the cultural norms of the late 19th and early 20th century America. The books cover the historical conditions and treatments of Native Americans, women deemed mentally ill and locked away, and those considered developmentally handicapped, mentally handicapped and/or genetically inferior.

The Evolution of Jazz

Rutland Free Library 10 Court St, Rutland, VT, United States

Ray Vega and his quartet will present a musical program demonstrating the elements of Jazz. The ensemble will address the ever changing styles of the music from the Blues to Ragtime to Traditional to Swing to Bebop and beyond. Vega and the members of his ensemble will participate in a question and answer session at the end of their presentation.

Outsiders: Those Who Fell Outside the Cultural Norm

Pawlet Public Library 141 School St, Pawlet, VT, United States

This discussion series examines the treatment of populations outside the cultural norms of the late 19th and early 20th century America. The books cover the historical conditions and treatments of Native Americans, women deemed mentally ill and locked away, and those considered developmentally handicapped, mentally handicapped and/or genetically inferior.

Murder in the Vermont Woods: A Story About Race, Class, and Gender in the 19th Century

Roger Clark Memorial Library 40 Village Green, Pittsfield, VT, United States

Historian Jill Mudgett tells the story of an Indigenous man from southern New England who came to central Vermont during the late 19th century and was the victim of a murder. Recreating community connections in a rural Vermont hill town, this story is about poverty, racism, disability, and gendered violence against women, but is also an account of Indigenous movement and choice despite great obstacles.

Outsiders: Those Who Fell Outside the Cultural Norm

Pawlet Public Library 141 School St, Pawlet, VT, United States

This discussion series examines the treatment of populations outside the cultural norms of the late 19th and early 20th century America. The books cover the historical conditions and treatments of Native Americans, women deemed mentally ill and locked away, and those considered developmentally handicapped, mentally handicapped and/or genetically inferior.

The Hills of Home: Mountains and Identity in Vermont History

Roger Clark Memorial Library 40 Village Green, Pittsfield, VT, United States

Vermonters have strong ideas about the importance of their mountain topography. Where did our pride in Vermont’s landscape come from, and why is it that we see our shared identity as rooted in the land? This lecture by historian Jill Mudgett is timely and relevant in its relationship to current interdisciplinary scholarship, and offers us tools to understand the origins and meaning of our own strongly-held attachments to the Vermont landscape.

From Homebrew to the House of Fermentology

Castleton University, Jeffords Auditorium 233 South St, Castleton, Vermont, United States

Bill Mares began making his own beer 45 years ago, when home brewing was illegal and there were no microbreweries in America. In this presentation, he offers a short history of beer itself and discusses Vermont’s small but significant contribution to the American beer revolution.

Postponed POSTPONED: Wolf Peaches, Poisoned Peas, and Madame Pompadour’s Underwear: The Surprising History of Common Garden Vegetables

Pawlet Public Library 141 School St, Pawlet, VT, United States

Common garden vegetables have long and fascinating histories. Science and history writer Rebecca Rupp will discuss the stories behind many of our favorites, among them the much-maligned tomato and potato, the (mostly) popular pumpkin, and Vermont’s dynamic duo of kale and Gilfeather turnip. Find out why a lot of us don’t like beets, how a 17th-century pirate named the bell pepper, how carrots won the Trojan War, and how George Washington was nearly assassinated with a plate of poisoned peas.

Endangered Alphabets, Cultural Erosion, and the Future of the Written Word

Poultney Public Library 205 Main St Ste 1, Poultney, VT, United States

What does the age of digital convergence, Facebook, and globalization mean for the future of the written word? Writer/carver/painter Tim Brookes offers remarkable and thought-provoking perspective on this question by looking at a range of forms of writing from all over the world that are in danger of extinction.

Vermont Women and the Civil War

Sherburne Memorial Library 2998 River Rd, Killington, United States

Historian Howard Coffin explains, with nearly 35,000 of the state’s able-bodied men at war, how women took on farming, worked in factories, served as nurses in the state’s military hospitals, and more. And at least one Vermont woman appears to have secretly enlisted and fought in a Vermont regiment!

Drawing from letters and diaries, Coffin tells their story in their own words, describe life during the Civil War in the Green Mountain State.