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March 2018

Celebrating E. B. White

March 7
7:00 pm
Image of EB White with dog

From Charlotte’s Web to his exquisite essays in The New Yorker, E.B. White remains the master’s master of elegant prose, sophisticated wit, and graceful irreverence. Read More »

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Where Am I? The Power of Uniqueness

March 7
7:00 pm

Former Scenic America President and TED talk lecturer Ed McMahon, who holds the Charles E. Fraser Chair on Sustainable Development at the Urban Land Institute, highlights the importance of a sense of place and explores why our physical surroundings are worth caring about. Read More »

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Building for a Gilded Age

March 7
7:00 pm

Middlebury College architecture professor Glenn Andres explores how the U.S. asserted itself architecturally on the world stage around the turn of the twentieth century, a time of bold experiments, proud philanthropy, and a desire to rival the Old World in splendor. Read More »

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Memoirs of an Art Dealer

Former Head of American Paintings at Christie's and Sotheby’s James Maroney shares stories of his experiences in the art world of the 1970s when American art began to come into its own. Read More »

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Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln

March 7
7:00 pm
St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, St Johnsbury
Image of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln

Douglass and Lincoln — one born a slave, the other born dirt poor — became respectively one of the nation’s greatest orators and one of its greatest presidents. Harvard professor John Stauffer examines their friendship, the similarities in their lives, and their legacies. Read More »

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The Known World and the Literary Character

March 7
7:00 pm

Amherst professor Judith Frank discusses Edward P. Jones’ 2003 Pulitzer-winning novel The Known World, described as “a masterpiece that deserves a place in the American literary canon,” and considers what its unusual approach to characterization can tell us about slavery, personhood, and novel-reading. Read More »

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Transatlantic Traumas: Endangering the West

March 7
7:00 pm
Brownell Library, Essex Junction
Image of the White House in thunderstorm

"The West" has been challenged by President Trump's policies, Russian covert actions, and domestic nativist and nationalistic tendencies. Stan Sloan, Visiting Scholar at Middlebury and author of Defense of the West, examines whether a perfect storm of external threats and internal politics is undermining Western values and interests. Read More »

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Presidents Appointing Judges

March 7
7:00 pm
Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury
Image of President Trump with Neil Gorsuch

As UVM professor Lisa Holmes explains, while presidents have long used judicial appointments to tilt the judiciary in one direction or another, less common historically have been presidents gaining great political benefit from appointing judges for ideological reasons. Its impact on the health of the judiciary remains to be seen. Read More »

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Science and Democracy

March 7
7:00 pm

The scientific method has been heralded as inherently democratic, but with scientists carrying a kind of authority based on their specialized knowledge, the relationship between science and democracy is more complex. Middlebury professor Heidi Grasswick examines the challenges of integrating the goals of democracy with the practices of science. Read More »

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April 2018

Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales: Still Funny After All These Years

April 4
7:00 pm

Dartmouth professor Peter Travis discusses the genius, literary achievement, and enduring humanity of Geoffrey Chaucer, the fourteenth-century “Father of English Poetry.” Read More »

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