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March 2021

*DIGITAL* How Yiddish Changed America and How America Changed Yiddish

March 3
7:00 pm
Painting of Jewish immigrants arriving in New York by boat

Yiddish is imprinted in American English in terms like chutzpah, kosher, bagel, and schmooze. And the work of Jewish authors shows the deep impact of Jewish immigration on the United States. Amherst College professor Ilan Stavans surveys the journey. (Registration Required.) Read More »

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*DIGITAL* Religious Literacy is Social Justice

March 3
7:00 pm
Brownell Library, Essex Junction
Man in turban looking at North American city

UVM professor Ilyse Morgenstein Fuerst describes religious literacy as a social justice issue. She explores who is allowed to be religiously illiterate, who has to be religiously literate, and how to learn more about religion. (Registration required.) Read More »

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*DIGITAL* Roman Women

March 3
7:00 pm
Statue of Roman woman

Some might expect that the lives of women in the Roman world revolved entirely around the family and domesticity. But Roman women owned property, ran businesses, and represented themselves in court. Middlebury classics professor Jane Chaplin discusses the place of women in the Roman world, the sources about them, and the values attached to them. (Registration required.) Read More »

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*DIGITAL* US Immigration Policy in Historical Perspective

March 3
7:00 pm

It may seem that the current anxieties about immigration in the US have never been more intense, but history suggests otherwise. Dartmouth professor Richard Wright examines the present-day contradictions of US immigration policy and places them in historical perspective. (Registration required.) Read More »

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*DIGITAL* In Wildness: Imagining the American West

March 3
7:00 pm
Man on horse beside edge of Grand Canyon

Thoreau wrote that “the West of which I speak is but another name for the Wild,” and indeed for much of its history the American West has been associated with the idea of wildness. St. Michael’s College professor Nathaniel Lewis explores our understanding of both nation and nature in the imagined West. (Registration required.) Read More »

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*DIGITAL* Vincent Van Gogh and His Language of Compassion

March 3
7:00 pm
Memory of the Garden at Etten (Ladies of Arles) by Vincent van Gogh (1853–1890)

Despite his reputation for madness, Vincent Van Gogh was a compassionate and faith-filled man. Art historian Carol Berry explains how Van Gogh depicted the sacredness of life in ways that touched and comforted people around the world. (Registration required.) Read More »

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*DIGITAL* Various Useless and Pleasing Things: Crafty Children in the Nineteenth Century

Painting of children working on crafts in the 1800s

Crafts for children as an activity were invented in the decades after the Civil War. Saint Michael’s professor Maura D'Amore shares scenes of planning, cutting, pasting, and constructing from the 1860s and 1870s that show a new appreciation for guided childhood tinkering. (Registration required.) Read More »

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*DIGITAL* A History of the Concept of Race

March 3
7:00 pm
Four different faces forming a single image

The first European to divide the people of the world into distinct races did so in the 17th century. This bizarre categorization developed into one of the most historically significant ideas of the modern world. Marlboro professor William Edelglass traces the intellectual history of the concept of race in the West, from its prehistory to today. (Registration required.) Read More »

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*DIGITAL* Lowest White Boy: On the Hidden Forces of American Racism

March 3
7:00 pm
Boy with American flag beside car with graffiti

Lyndon Johnson once observed, “If you can convince the lowest white man he’s better than the best colored man, he won’t notice you’re picking his pocket.” UVM English professor Greg Bottoms discusses his memoir, "Lowest White Boy," which explores the powerful historical, cultural, social, and political forces behind white supremacy. (Registration required.) Read More »

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*DIGITAL* Bearing Witness and Endurance of Voice: The Legacy of Lucy Terry Prince

March 3
7:00 pm
Painting of Lucy Terry Prince

In this presentation, Shanta Lee Gander illustrates the life of Lucy Terry Prince—born in Africa, transported to Rhode Island by slave traders, and eventually living free in Vermont. Gander discusses Prince's importance as a poet and orator, and as author of the oldest known poem in the United States written by an African American. Read More »

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