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August 2019

Sailing Towards My Father

August 24
2:00 pm
Image of Stephen Collins as Melville

Sailing Towards My Father is a one-man play written and directed by Carl A. Rossi and performed by professional actor Stephen Collins, who has portrayed a number of historical figures. The play is about Herman Melville (1819-1891), the American author best known for his whaling epic Moby-Dick. Read More »

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The Many Meanings of Maple

August 26
7:00 pm
Image of postcard of maple syrup gathering

Maple is enormously important to Vermont’s economy, ecology, and heritage. Champlain College professor Michael Lange will discuss sugaring ethnographically, based on over five years of research among sugarmakers all over the state, to learn from them what sugaring really means to Vermont. Read More »

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“That the People May Live”: The Life and Legacy of Nicholas Black Elk, Holy Man of the Lakota

August 27
5:30 pm
Black Elk with his wife and family

This lecture explores the life and legacy of Nicholas Black Elk (c. 1866-1950), the Lakota holy man made famous by the book Black Elk Speaks. Author and ethnographer Damian Costello begins with Black Elk’s Great Vision and his struggle to discern his calling during the events of the Great Sioux War. Read More »

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Book Discussion: Girl with a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier

August 28
7:00 pm
Dover Free Library, East Dover

Part of the Portraits of the Artists series. These books feature fictional interpretations of famous artists. What happens when the visual arts and the literary arts meet? How do fiction writers interpret the lives of famous painters, and the canvases they leave behind? Read More »

Vermont Reads 2019: Discussion of March: Book One

August 28
7:00 pm

On the 56th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, join us for a discussion of John Lewis’ graphic memoir March: Book One, the Vermont Reads book for 2019. We will explore the book and the greater historical context. Please register for this discussion group by contacting the library and to check out a copy of the book. Read More »

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Vermont, 1800 and Froze to Death: The Cold Year of 1816

August 29
7:00 pm
Image of Vermont field in winter

1816 has long been known as the year without summer. Vermonters still call it “1800 and Froze to Death,” a year of frosts every month, dark skies, and mysterious lights that caused a widespread belief that a higher power was displeased. In this talk, historian Howard Coffin includes scores of anecdotes on the dark year of failed crops, scarce food, and religious revival. Read More »

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Vermont Reads 2019: Protest Song Sing-a-long

August 29
7:00 pm

In honor of the Vermont Reads 2019 book March: Book One by John Lewis, and the anniversary of the historic March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, join us for a protest song sing-a-long led by the Mount Mansfield Freedom and Unity Singers. This is a participatory program, but all are welcome to attend. Read More »

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September 2019

VA Combat Veterans Book Group 2019

September 4
5:00 pm
Image of veterans' hands clasped behind back

VHC's Veterans Book Groups create an opportunity for veterans to connect with each other, build relationships, read insightful materials, and share experiences. The group’s explorations include books, poetry, articles, and short stories, with the goal of fostering camaraderie and a safe space to reflect and share ideas and questions. Open to all veterans who served in combat. Read More »

400 Miles Down the Connecticut River

September 4
6:00 pm
Image of old postcard of the Connecticut River

New England's longest river, the Connecticut, is rich in history. Michael Tougias, author of fourteen books about New England, offers a narrated slide presentation that takes the viewer down the entire 410 miles of the river, discussing history from the days of loggers, Indian Wars, steamships, and canals. Read More »

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Vermont, 1800 and Froze to Death: The Cold Year of 1816

September 4
7:00 pm
Image of Vermont field in winter

1816 has long been known as the year without summer. Vermonters still call it “1800 and Froze to Death,” a year of frosts every month, dark skies, and mysterious lights that caused a widespread belief that a higher power was displeased. In this talk, historian Howard Coffin includes scores of anecdotes on the dark year of failed crops, scarce food, and religious revival. Read More »

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