Vermont Humanities
George Floyd memorial wall in Minneapolis

Say Their Names, A Personal Story of Artistic Activism

In response to the murders of Breonna Taylor, George Floyd, and Ahmaud Arbery, Dr. Matthew Evan Taylor from Middlebury College created a musical composition. This video features selections from that recording as Dr. Taylor discusses his journey towards using music as an avenue for advocacy and activism.

Four Kurdish refugee women

Refugee Theater: Kurdish and Yazidi Women Speak Out

Video: Rojava, a revolutionary experiment in Kurdish Syria, attempts to create an inclusive democracy safe from ISIS, Turkish incursion, and Syria’s civil war. Smith College professor Ellen W. Kaplan discusses the process of interviewing women, activists, refugees, and fighters from the Rojava region, and transforming their experiences into theater.

Image of pill bottles

The Opioid Crisis: A Historical Perspective

Video: Today’s opioid epidemic is usually portrayed as a new and shocking development. Yet it is only the most recent crisis in more than a century of widespread addiction to pharmaceuticals. Historian David Herzberg tells the story of past epidemics of addiction and draws lessons from America’s long history of drug policy failures and occasional successes.

Image of man with bullhorn

Arguing about Civility

Video: Middlebury political scientist Sarah Stroup focuses on two questions for both local and national discourse: What topics are suitable for public discussion? And how can we facilitate productive disagreements?

Image at Nazi record listening booth

Daily Life in Prewar Nazi Germany

Video: Focusing on the prewar experience of non-Jewish citizens, Keene State professor Paul Vincent examines how ideology and terror undermined human dignity, numbed self-awareness, and atomized German society.

Image of boy in cornfield

Race at Ground Zero: Integration in Leland, Mississippi

Video: Pulitzer-winning historian and filmmaker Douglas Blackmon speaks about and offers a sneak peek of his documentary film The Harvest. It looks at the failure of public school integration and its relation to our nation’s current racial turmoil, as seen through the eyes of people born in 1964 in his hometown of Leland, Mississippi—the state’s first students to attend integrated classrooms from K to 12.