Vermont Humanities
Person standing on a dock in the rain

NPR’s Eric Westervelt on Bigger Fires, Hotter Days, and Drier Lands

NPR national correspondent Eric Westervelt describes how mega fires, excessive heat and widening drought all underscore how climate change is fueling the routinization of extreme weather, with consequences for all of us.

Woman walking through a maze beside a seaside cliff

The Zone is Us: Sacrifice in the Space-Time of Climate Change

Gleaning from classical mythology, UVM professor Adrian Ivakhiv suggests three paths for navigating climate-related trauma: those of Chronos (science), of Aion (arts and humanities), and of Kairos (action without guarantee).

Author and environmental activist Bill McKibben. photo by Nancie Battaglia

Thinking Through the Future with Bill McKibben

Author Bill McKibben shares how the humanities can help us understand climate change, the greatest crisis we’ve ever found ourselves in. From the biblical book of Job to the latest science fiction, literature gives us clues to how we might shrink ourselves and our society a little.

Climate advocate Elizabeth Yeampierre

The Path to Climate Justice is Local

Puerto Rican climate justice leader Elizabeth Yeampierre has helped pass climate legislation at all levels, including New York’s progressive Climate Leadership and Community Protection Act. In this talk she describes how intergenerational BIPOC activists are changing the landscape of national climate priorities by speaking up for themselves and their neighborhoods.

Young man holding an American flag jumping between rocks in a river

Are “We the People” Up to the Task?

In the United States, all power is derived from the people. While this sounds noble in theory, can we expect the American public to have the wits and self-control to meet the demands of climate change? Constitutional scholar Meg Mott explores the paradox of self-governance when the natural foundations of life itself are changing.

Poet Sarah Audsley in a black dress in front of a large gray rock.

Words in the Woods with Poet Sarah Audsley

Join poet Sarah Audsley in a video recorded at the Taconic Mountains Ramble in Hubbarton, Vermont for the latest installment of “Words in the Woods.” Sarah reads six poems from her manuscript-in-progress and reflects with Vermont Humanities staffers Rachel Edens and Sahra Ali on the power of place and the influence of identity.

Poet Shanta Lee leaning against a tree

Words in the Woods with Poet Shanta Lee

Join poet Shanta Lee in a video recorded at Sweet Pond State Park in Guilford, Vermont for the latest installment of Words in the Woods. Shanta reads from her collection, GHETTOCLAUSTROPHOBIA: Dreamin of Mama While Trying to Speak Woman in Woke Tongues, and reflects with Vermont Humanities staffers Rachel Edens and Sahra Ali on the craft of poetry.

Image of Madeline Kunin press conference

From Politics to Poetry

As the first woman governor for the State of Vermont, the ambassador to Switzerland for President Clinton, and the holder of other prestigious positions, Madeleine Kunin has inspired women and girls to discover their own voices as leaders. Governor Kunin speaks about her life in politics and read to us from her newest book of poetry, “Red Kite, Blue Sky.”

Policeman from behind with close up of holster

Television Cop Shows, Police Violence, and Black Lives Matter

How do television cop shows shape our understanding of police, race, and crime in America? Focusing on the television series “The Wire,” Middlebury professor Jason Mittell challenges our understanding of this television genre in the era of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Speakers Delma Jackson III and Kesha Ram

Kesha Ram and Delma Jackson: What Does Race Have to Do With It?

The day after the verdict in the George Floyd murder trial was announced, the Center for Whole Communities in Burlington hosted a discussion between Senator Ram and Delma Jackson, the co-host of the Dive-In-Justice podcast.