“We who believe in freedom cannot rest.”

“Until the killing of Black men, Black mothers’ sons
Is as important as the killing of white men, white mothers’ sons,
We who believe in freedom cannot rest.”

– Ella Baker, as quoted by Bernice Johnson Reagon in Ella’s Song

Dear Friends,

The events of this last week precipitated by the horrific murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis are now seared into our collective conscience as Americans.  Our hearts go out to Mr. Floyd’s family and friends, the people of Minneapolis, and all who are afflicted by deadly racism.

All of us at Vermont Humanities are determined to respond. As our friend Rep. John Lewis says, “Just as people of all faiths and no faiths, and all backgrounds, creeds, and colors banded together decades ago to fight for equality and justice in a peaceful, orderly, non-violent fashion, we must do so again.”

Our Statement about the Death of George Floyd

We’re determined to find ways to help and ways to communicate through the lens of the humanities.

Opportunities to Help

Suggestions on actions you can take in response to the horrific murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Please send us your ideas so we can add them to the list.

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