Words in the Woods with Poet Shanta Lee Gander

Join poet Shanta Lee Gander in a video recorded at Sweet Pond State Park in Guilford, Vermont for the latest installment of Words in the Woods. Shanta reads from her collection, GHETTOCLAUSTROPHOBIA: Dreamin of Mama While Trying to Speak Woman in Woke Tongues, and reflects with Vermont Humanities staffers Rachel Edens and Sahra Ali on the craft of poetry.

From Politics to Poetry

As the first woman governor for the State of Vermont, the ambassador to Switzerland for President Clinton, and the holder of other prestigious positions, Madeleine Kunin has inspired women and girls to discover their own voices as leaders. Governor Kunin speaks about her life in politics and read to us from her newest book of poetry, “Red Kite, Blue Sky.”

Television Cop Shows, Police Violence, and Black Lives Matter

How do television cop shows shape our understanding of police, race, and crime in America? Focusing on the television series “The Wire,” Middlebury professor Jason Mittell challenges our understanding of this television genre in the era of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Ancient Eyes – Ageless Skies

Since the dawn of human civilization, people have gazed into the heavens, trying to find meaning and connection to their lives. Monuments like Stonehenge and the Great Pyramid attest to the significance of the stars, which still offer important lessons for us today.

Poetry During Covid-19

Inspired by the Mary Oliver poem, “Wild Geese,” Saint Michael’s College professor Adrie Kusserow wrote “Mary Oliver for Corona Times,” stating, You do not have to use this isolation to make your marriage better/your body slimmer, your children more creative. She discusses Oliver’s poem and explores ways in which the pandemic has sparked creative work.

Charity and Sylvia: A Same-Sex Couple in Early Vermont

Drawing from the Sheldon Museum collections, archivist Eva Garcelon-Hart presents the story of two extraordinary women, Charity Bryant and Sylvia Drake, who were accepted in early 19th-century rural Vermont as a married couple.

How Yiddish Changed America and How America Changed Yiddish

Yiddish is imprinted in American English in terms like chutzpah, kosher, bagel, and schmooze. And the work of Sholem Aleichem, Anzia Yezierska, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Grace Paley, and Irving Howe shows the deep impact of Jewish immigration on the United States. Amherst College professor Ilan Stavans surveys the journey.

Libraries in the Time of Covid

In the wake of the pandemic, libraries have had to both evaluate and rapidly respond to the changing world. Librarian Jessamyn West helps us to understand the role of the library in these unusual times.