About the Vermont Humanities Council

Because Ideas Matter

Stories

Read our latest stories below, browse our print newsletters, or join our mailing list.

Before Your Time: Vermont’s Great Flood

It is considered the biggest natural disaster in Vermont’s history. But the 1927 flood was an even bigger turning point. The rebuilding process set in place some of the infrastructure that we still use today. And right before the Great Depression and the New Deal years of the 1930s, it focused the federal government’s attention – and some of its money – on a state that had never really asked for it.

read more

What Princeton Needed

These days the needs and priorities of colleges and universities are not always in sync with what some wealthy alumni want to fund. But as Peter Gilbert explains, it’s a trend that’s not exactly new.

read more

Vermont Reads: Brown Girl Dreaming

It’s been called a memoir in verse, a collection of vignettes about time, place, family and race. The book Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson defies convention and can be read in any number of ways, as it will be for this year’s Vermont Reads.

read more

First Wednesdays Lecture Series Begins September 27

The Vermont Humanities Council’s popular First Wednesdays statewide lecture series begins a new season of diverse talks with renowned scholars this fall. New Yorker humorist and writer Calvin Trillin kicks off the season on the special date of September 27 with his talk “The Writing Life” at UVM’s Ira Allen Chapel.

read more

Celestial Visions

The viewing of the solar eclipse reminded Peter Gilbert of his experience viewing Halley’s Comet in January 1986, and the finite nature of life.

read more

Statement on Inclusion

The Vermont Arts Council and the Vermont Humanities Council stand together in stating:

We are deeply troubled by recent violence and expressions of hatred and bigotry that go against the fundamental ideals that define our country. We know that the arts and humanities have the power to create and nurture empathy, promote thoughtful reflection, heal, and advance understanding even among people whose lives are vastly different from our own.

read more