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Windsor

Last Updated 7/24/2014 12:57:15 PM

Vermont Humanities Events 

Windsor

Through Fall 2014— Covered Bridges of Woodstock Exhibit. Grant Event. The exhibit celebrates Woodstock's covered bridges past and present on the occasion of the Taftsville bridge re-opening. Visit www.woodstockhistorical. org or call for hours. Hosted by the Woodstock Historical Society and supported by a VHC grant. Woodstock History Center, 26 Elm St. Jennie Shurtleff, (802) 457-1822.

Through Spring 2015 — Cycles of Change: Farming in Norwich. Grant Event. An exhibit documenting agricultural heritage through the stories of eight working farms. On display through spring 2015. Visit norwichhistory.org for more information. Hosted by the Norwich Historical Society and supported by a VHC grant. Norwich Historical Society, 277 Main St. Norwich Historical Society, (802) 649-0124 or info@norwichhistory.org.

July 24 — Hand in Hand Community Dinner: Wonder. A Vermont Reads Event. Join us for a five course meal celebrating Wonder by R.J. Palacio. Free and open to the public. Hosted by the Hand in Hand Community Service Inc.. Woodstock, North Universalist Chapel Society, 7 Church St, 5:00 pm. Lauren Wilder, (802) 229-1777 or handinhandcommunityservice@gmail.com.

July 25 — Bringing Wonder to Life. A Vermont Reads Event. Sam Drazin of Changing Perspectives will use his personal experiences to help participants in this all-ages program learn more about the challenges faced by Auggie, the main character of Wonder. Part of the Bookstock Festival. Books available through Hand in Hand Community Service. Hosted by the Hand in Hand Community Service Inc.. Woodstock Inn, Wilder Room, 14 The Green, 1:00 pm. Lauren Wilder, (802) 229-1777 or handinhandcommunityservice@gmail.com.

July 25–27 — Bookstock: The Green Mountain Literary Festival 2014. Grant Event. Bookstock brings forty poets, writers, and artists to read from and discuss their work. It also includes a huge used book sale, exhibition tent, music, and food. Hosted by Sustainable Woodstock and supported by a VHC grant. Woodstock, Various locations. Ron Miller, info@bookstockvt.org.

July 26 — Bookstock: Wonder Booth. A Vermont Reads Event. Stop by our booth in the Vendor tent for information on VHC and Vermont Reads, Hand in Hand Community Service, Arts Poetica, Sherburne Memorial Library, and Killington Arts Guild. Hosted by the Hand in Hand Community Service Inc.. Woodstock, The Green, 10:00 am. Lauren Wilder, (802) 229-1777 or handinhandcommunityservice@gmail.com.

August 9 — A High Price to Pay, A Heavy Burden to Bear: One Family’s Civil War Story. Abel Morrill, Sr., was an early settler of Cabot, Vermont. He was a respected farmer and maple sugar producer for much of the 19th century. His story reflects the hardship and heartbreak suffered by those who lived at the time of America’s greatest conflict, the Civil War. David Book’s portrayal of Abel Morrill profiles life before the war and life as it was affected by the war. Drawing on primary resources, Book’s monologue describes with historical accuracy life in mid-19th century Vermont and is a story that could be repeated by many families in every town in Vermont during this era. Hosted by the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation. Plymouth, President Calvin Coolidge Museum & Education Center, 3780 Route 100A, 2:00 pm. William Jenney, (802) 672-3773.

August 11 — Book Discussion: Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England by William Cronon. Part of the When Cultures Meet: First Contact in the Lake Champlain Basin series. This series commemorates the Lake Champlain Quadricentennial in 2009. In 1609, Frenchman Samuel de Champlain became the first European to visit the 110- mile lake that now bears his name. (In 1608, Champlain had founded Quebec City.) In fiction and nonfiction, the series explores the ramifications of contact between Europeans and the native inhabitants in the Champlain Basin and New England generally, and the ensuing history of the region. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Quechee Library. Quechee, Library, 1957 Main Street, 4:30 pm. Kate Schaal, (802) 295-1232.

August 17 — Shipwrecks of Lake Champlain. Learn about Lake Champlain's most harrowing shipwreck stories from the Revolutionary War to the present day with underwater archaeologist Adam Kane. With over 300 wrecks in its dark, cold waters, Lake Champlain has witnessed feats of heroism and terrible tragedies. Take a memorable tour through slides, drawings, and video of what lies beneath the waves. Hosted by the Weston Historical Society. Weston, Old Parish Church, 644 S Main St, Route 100, 1:30 pm. Robert Brandt, (802) 824-5486.

August 26 — The Old Country Fiddler: Charles Ross Taggart, Vermont’s Traveling Entertainer. Having grown up in Topsham, Vermont, Charles Ross Taggart went on to a forty-year career performing in countless stage shows across the country, including the famous Red Path Chautauqua circuit. A fiddler, piano player, humorist, singer, and ventriloquist, he made at least 25 recordings with the Victor, Edison, and Columbia companies, and appeared in a talking movie picture four years before Al Jolson starred in The Jazz Singer. Fiddler Adam Boyce portrays Mr. Taggart near the end of his career, circa 1936, sharing recollections of his life and career interspersed with live fiddling and humorous sketches. Hosted by the Barnard Historical Society. Barnard, Barnard Historical Society, 6415 VT Route 12, 7:00 pm. Caz Rozonewski, (802) 234 -9080.

August 27 — Agatha Christie: Creator of Miss Jane Marple and Hercule Poirot. In this living history performance by Helene Lang, Ms. Christie tells you how a typewriter in Torguay spawned over 80 mysteries and created Miss Jane Marple and Hercule Poirot. Learn about her life and walk in her footsteps in England. Discover why she was so knowledgeable about the poisons used in her stories; what influences in her life informed the creation of her famous leading detectives; some personal information about her family; and why she went to Yorkshire under an assumed name. Hosted by the Hartford Library. Hartford, Greater Hartford United Church of Christ, 1721 Maple Street, 7:00 pm. Nadine Hodgdon, (802) 296-2568.

September 7 — The Vermont Civil War Songbook. Dressed in period costume, singer/researcher Linda Radtke shares songs from Vermont during the Civil War period, with engaging commentary and letters from Vermont soldiers. Seldom-heard songs from the Vermont Historical Society include the comic but poignant "Grafted into the Army," "Yankee Robinson at Bull Run," "Neath the Pines of Vermont" (in which a soldier returns home to die), a satirical song about Jefferson Davis, and sentimental ballads from Vermont during the period. Linda Radtke is joined by pianist Arthur Zorn in this program for all audiences that brings the Civil War period in Vermont to life through music and letters. Hosted by the Green Mountain Perkins Academy and Historical Association. South Woodstock, Green Mountain Perkins Academy, 1 Academy Circle, 2:00 pm. Mark Curran, (802) 457-3251.

September 9 — Book Discussion: The Arabian Nights by Muhsin Mahdi, ed., Husain Haddawy, trans.. Part of the Literary Reflections on Islam series. Islam has long provided a source of inspiration through which Muslims experience, understand, and guide their everyday lives. This series, developed jointly by the American Library Association and the NEH, offers literary reflections on Muslim piety and communal concepts such as ethics, governance, knowledge, and identity, and reveals transformations in faith and identity, as Muslims living at different times and in different places have interpreted Islam. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Mary McKenna, (802) 296-2191.

September 10 — The Changing Music Scene of the 1940s. Catamount Arts’ Martin Bryan takes a look at the popular music scene of the 1940s—how it was affected by war, the musicians’ union, and the war’s aftermath—and how music styles evolved from the beginning of the decade to its end. Bryan’s talk includes selections from original 78 rpm recordings, ranging from Big Band swing to wartime music, from popular Broadway musicals to bebop, and more. Americans marched off to war and returned to a changed society; Bryan documents that time through its music. Hosted by the Valley Terrace Assisted Living. White River Junction, Valley Terrace Assisted Living, 2820 Christian St, 2:30 pm. Bobbi Trombley, (802) 280-1910.

September 30 — Book Discussion: The Conference of the Birds by Farid al-Din Attar. Part of the Literary Reflections on Islam series. Islam has long provided a source of inspiration through which Muslims experience, understand, and guide their everyday lives. This series, developed jointly by the American Library Association and the NEH, offers literary reflections on Muslim piety and communal concepts such as ethics, governance, knowledge, and identity, and reveals transformations in faith and identity, as Muslims living at different times and in different places have interpreted Islam. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Mary McKenna, (802) 296-2191.

October 12 — The Battle of Lake Champlain. On September 11, 1814—187 years before the attack on the World Trade Center—British Army and Royal Naval forces attacked a regular American army and navy at Cumberland Bay in Plattsburgh. Although backed by Vermont Militia, the Americans were outnumbered nearly four to one. If the invaders had won, they could have taken Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. This largest and most decisive battle of the War of 1812 determined the future of our nation; it is a story of great courage and human tragedy told by Colonel David Fitz-Enz. Hosted by the Woodstock Historical Society. Woodstock History Center, 26 Elm St, 2:00 pm. Jennie Shurtleff, (802) 457-1822.

October 21 — Book Discussion: Dreams of Trespass by Fatima Mernissi. Part of the Literary Reflections on Islam series. Islam has long provided a source of inspiration through which Muslims experience, understand, and guide their everyday lives. This series, developed jointly by the American Library Association and the NEH, offers literary reflections on Muslim piety and communal concepts such as ethics, governance, knowledge, and identity, and reveals transformations in faith and identity, as Muslims living at different times and in different places have interpreted Islam. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Mary McKenna, (802) 296-2191.

November 11 — Book Discussion: Minaret by Leila Aboulela. Part of the Literary Reflections on Islam series. Islam has long provided a source of inspiration through which Muslims experience, understand, and guide their everyday lives. This series, developed jointly by the American Library Association and the NEH, offers literary reflections on Muslim piety and communal concepts such as ethics, governance, knowledge, and identity, and reveals transformations in faith and identity, as Muslims living at different times and in different places have interpreted Islam. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Mary McKenna, (802) 296 -2191.

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