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Windsor

Last Updated 12/18/2014 10:51:07 AM

Vermont Humanities Events 

Windsor

Through Spring 2015 — Cycles of Change: Farming in Norwich. Grant Event. An exhibit documenting agricultural heritage through the stories of eight working farms. On display through spring 2015. Visit norwichhistory.org for more information. Hosted by the Norwich Historical Society and supported by a VHC grant. Norwich Historical Society, 277 Main St. Norwich Historical Society, (802) 649-0124 or info@norwichhistory.org.

January 7 — Georgia O'Keeffe: A Critical Look. Georgia O'Keeffe lived 99 years and produced more than 2,000 works in her 75- year career. James Maroney, the former head of American Paintings at both Sotheby's and Christie's in New York who appraised her estate after her death, presents a critical evaluation of her best work.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

January 7 — Anne Frank’s Neighbors: What Did They Do? Although Anne Frank’s Diary is the most widely read nonfiction book in the world after the Bible, little attention has been paid to her neighbors—the people who lived alongside the Jewish population as persecution intensified. Mary Fillmore examines the choices they faced and the decisions they made in the face of those choices. Why did some people ignore the situation, while others felt compelled to resist? What can we learn from them as we face the humanitarian crises of our own time? Hosted by the Thompson Center. Woodstock, Thompson Center, 99 Senior Lane, 1:00 pm. Pam Butler, (802) 457-3277

January 10 — The Secret Garden. Grant Event. This is the East Coast Premiere of a new opera (by composer Nolan Gasser with a libretto by Carey Harrison) based on the beloved children’s novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett, coming direct from its debut at the San Francisco Opera. Lora Rachel Davidson portrays the lead role of Mary Lennox, with a professional orchestra and cast, including soloists from the Metropolitan Opera, The Houston Opera, and Washington National Opera. Hosted by the Opera Theatre of Weston. Weston Playhouse, 12 Park St, 2:00 pm. Anne Dolivo, (802) 768-8144.

January 11 — The Secret Garden. Grant Event. This is the East Coast Premiere of a new opera (by composer Nolan Gasser with a libretto by Carey Harrison) based on the beloved children’s novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett, coming direct from its debut at the San Francisco Opera. Lora Rachel Davidson portrays the lead role of Mary Lennox, with a professional orchestra and cast, including soloists from the Metropolitan Opera, The Houston Opera, and Washington National Opera. Hosted by the Opera Theatre of Weston. Weston Playhouse, 1212 Park St, 2:00 pm. Anne Dolivo, (802) 768-8144.

January 14 — Live Stream of What’s the Use of Stories That Aren’t Even True? A Vermont Reads Event and First Wednesdays lecture. Public viewing of the live video feed from Burlington of Salman Rushdie, author of VHC's 2015 Vermont Reads Book, Haroun and the Sea of Stories, discussing the importance of storytelling. Hosted by the Quechee Library. Quechee Library, 1957 Main Street, 5:00 pm. Marieke Sperry, (802) 295 -6341.

January 14 — Live Stream of What’s the Use of Stories That Aren’t Even True? A Vermont Reads Event and First Wednesdays lecture. See description above. Hosted by the The Book Nook. Ludlow, Black River Middle-High School Library, Library Learning Commons, 43 Main St, 5:00 pm. Contact The Book Nook, (802) 228-3238.

January 17 — Song of the Vikings. Like Greek mythology, Norse myths are still with us, inspiring storytellers from Tolkien to Neil Gaiman, Michael Chabon, and A.S. Byatt. Surprisingly, most of what we know about Valhalla and the Valkyries, Odin and the Well of Wisdom, the Mighty Thor, and Ragnarok or the Twilight of the Gods was written by a 13th-century Icelandic chieftain, Snorri Sturluson. Award-winning author Nancy Marie Brown brings the fascinating story of Sturluson’s life into focus, drawing on newly available sources and illuminating the folklore and pagan legends of medieval Scandinavia. Hosted by the Springfield Town Library. Springfield, Town Library, Flinn Reading Room, 43 Main St, 2:00 pm. Library, (802) 885-3108.

February 4 — Victoria’s Secrets. Middlebury College professor Antonia Losano explains how the Victorian era, the age of staid decorum, also had its guilty pleasures: mysteries, ghost stories, science fiction, imperialist adventure tales, and radical fantasies of gender confusion.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

March 4 — What If Poor Women Ran the World? Labor historian Annelise Orleck tells the story of nine African-American union maids in Las Vegas during the 1970s who challenged welfare cuts and built a long-lasting, vibrant antipoverty program run by poor mothers.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

April 1 — Vermont War Memorials, Statuary, and Cemeteries: from the Revolution to 9/11. In this illustrated talk, Vermont authors Bill Mares and Bill Lipke share Vermont’s commemorative history, from Ethan Allen to the War on Terror Memorial at Camp Johnson in Colchester.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

May 6 — All About Eve. Dartmouth professor of religion Susan Ackerman considers both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the Adam and Eve story and how recent scholarship on women and the Bible pushes us to rethink our common assumptions about Eve.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184..

July 13 — A High Price to Pay, A Heavy Burden to Bear: One Family’s Civil War Story. Abel Morrill, Sr., was an early settler of Cabot, Vermont. He was a respected farmer and maple sugar producer for much of the 19th century. His story reflects the hardship and heartbreak suffered by those who lived at the time of America’s greatest conflict, the Civil War. David Book’s portrayal of Abel Morrill profiles life before the war and life as it was affected by the war. Drawing on primary resources, Book’s monologue describes with historical accuracy life in mid-19th century Vermont and is a story that could be repeated by many families in every town in Vermont during this era. Hosted by the Woodstock Historical Society. Woodstock, John Cotton Dana Research Library, 26 Elm St, 7:00 pm. Jennie Shurtleff, (802) 457-1822.

August 10 — Colonial Meetinghouses of New England. New England’s colonial meetinghouses embody an important yet little-known chapter in American history. Built mostly with tax money, they served as both places of worship and places for town meetings, and were the centers of life in colonial New England communities. Using photographs of the few surviving “mint condition” meetinghouses as illustrations, this presentation by photographer Paul Wainwright tells the story of the society that built and used them, and the lasting impact they have had on American culture. Hosted by the Woodstock Historical Society. Woodstock, John Cotton Dana Research Library, 26 Elm St, 7:00 pm. Jennie Shurtleff, (802) 457-1822.

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