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Windsor

Last Updated 8/27/2014 3:42:19 PM

Vermont Humanities Events 

Windsor

Through Fall 2014— Covered Bridges of Woodstock Exhibit. Grant Event. The exhibit celebrates Woodstock's covered bridges past and present on the occasion of the Taftsville bridge re-opening. Visit www.woodstockhistorical. org or call for hours. Hosted by the Woodstock Historical Society and supported by a VHC grant. Woodstock History Center, 26 Elm St. Jennie Shurtleff, (802) 457-1822.

Through Spring 2015 — Cycles of Change: Farming in Norwich. Grant Event. An exhibit documenting agricultural heritage through the stories of eight working farms. On display through spring 2015. Visit norwichhistory.org for more information. Hosted by the Norwich Historical Society and supported by a VHC grant. Norwich Historical Society, 277 Main St. Norwich Historical Society, (802) 649-0124 or info@norwichhistory.org.

August 27 — Agatha Christie: Creator of Miss Jane Marple and Hercule Poirot. In this living history performance by Helene Lang, Ms. Christie tells you how a typewriter in Torguay spawned over 80 mysteries and created Miss Jane Marple and Hercule Poirot. Learn about her life and walk in her footsteps in England. Discover why she was so knowledgeable about the poisons used in her stories; what influences in her life informed the creation of her famous leading detectives; some personal information about her family; and why she went to Yorkshire under an assumed name. Hosted by the Hartford Library. Hartford, Greater Hartford United Church of Christ, 1721 Maple Street, 7:00 pm. Nadine Hodgdon, (802) 296-2568.

September 7 — The Vermont Civil War Songbook. Dressed in period costume, singer/researcher Linda Radtke shares songs from Vermont during the Civil War period, with engaging commentary and letters from Vermont soldiers. Seldom-heard songs from the Vermont Historical Society include the comic but poignant "Grafted into the Army," "Yankee Robinson at Bull Run," "Neath the Pines of Vermont" (in which a soldier returns home to die), a satirical song about Jefferson Davis, and sentimental ballads from Vermont during the period. Linda Radtke is joined by pianist Arthur Zorn in this program for all audiences that brings the Civil War period in Vermont to life through music and letters. Hosted by the Green Mountain Perkins Academy and Historical Association. South Woodstock, Green Mountain Perkins Academy, 1 Academy Circle, 2:00 pm. Mark Curran, (802) 457-3251.

September 9 — Book Discussion: The Arabian Nights by Muhsin Mahdi, ed., Husain Haddawy, trans.. Part of the Literary Reflections on Islam series. Islam has long provided a source of inspiration through which Muslims experience, understand, and guide their everyday lives. This series, developed jointly by the American Library Association and the NEH, offers literary reflections on Muslim piety and communal concepts such as ethics, governance, knowledge, and identity, and reveals transformations in faith and identity, as Muslims living at different times and in different places have interpreted Islam. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Mary McKenna, (802) 296-2191.

September 10 — The Changing Music Scene of the 1940s. Catamount Arts’ Martin Bryan takes a look at the popular music scene of the 1940s—how it was affected by war, the musicians’ union, and the war’s aftermath—and how music styles evolved from the beginning of the decade to its end. Bryan’s talk includes selections from original 78 rpm recordings, ranging from Big Band swing to wartime music, from popular Broadway musicals to bebop, and more. Americans marched off to war and returned to a changed society; Bryan documents that time through its music. Hosted by the Valley Terrace Assisted Living. White River Junction, Valley Terrace Assisted Living, 2820 Christian St, 2:30 pm. Bobbi Trombley, (802) 280-1910.

September 17 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part One: "A Very New Idea." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores the Native and Colonial roots from which Vermont grew. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Hartland Public Library. Hartland Public Library, 153 US Route 5, 153 Route 5, 6:30 pm. Theresa Gregory, (802) 436-2473.

September 18 — 13,000 Sheep in Norwich? Grant Event. Alan Berolzheimer gives an introductory lecture to establish the historical context of the town and region, specifically examining settlement patterns and agricultural change. Part of the “Reading the Agricultural Landscape” series, engaging residents as active learners, historians, and participants in their community. Cost: $10 for all three workshops or $5 per workshop. Space is limited and reservations are recommended. Hosted by the Norwich Historical Society. Norwich Historical Society, 277 Main St, 7:00 pm. Norwich Historical Society, (802) 649-0124 or info@norwichhistory.org.

September 28 — Preserving the Local Harvest. Grant Event. This hands-on workshop will teach participants traditional methods of preserving the local harvest. The workshop is limited to 10 participants, and there is a $5 per person charge for supplies. Call or email to register. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich, Upper Valley Community Grange, 344 Main St, 1:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

September 30 — Book Discussion: The Conference of the Birds by Farid al-Din Attar. Part of the Literary Reflections on Islam series. Islam has long provided a source of inspiration through which Muslims experience, understand, and guide their everyday lives. This series, developed jointly by the American Library Association and the NEH, offers literary reflections on Muslim piety and communal concepts such as ethics, governance, knowledge, and identity, and reveals transformations in faith and identity, as Muslims living at different times and in different places have interpreted Islam. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Mary McKenna, (802) 296-2191.

October 1 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Two: "Under the Surface." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores labor wars, eugenics, the McCarthy era, and progressive Republicanism. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Hartland Public Library. Hartland Public Library, 153 US Route 5, 6:30 pm. Theresa Gregory, (802) 436-2473.

October 1 — An Evening of George Gershwin. In this performance lecture, pianist Michael Arnowitt explores the music and era of George Gershwin and performs An American in Paris and Rhapsody in Blue, among other compositions.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

October 9 — Who Lived Here? Finding the Stories of Where You Live. Grant Event. Using a Norwich farm as a case study, participants will be led through a ‘how-to’ session about researching the story of a house and a farm using deeds, tax records, maps, the census, and other historical materials. Led by Alan Berolzheimer and Sarah Rooker. Cost: $10 for all three workshops or $5 per workshop. Space is limited and reservations are recommended. Workshop leaders will also be available during the fall to work one-on-one with those wishing to conduct their own research. Hosted by the Norwich Historical Society. Norwich Historical Society, 277 Main St, 7:00 pm. Norwich Historical Society, (802) 649-0124 or info@norwichhistory.org.

October 12 — The Battle of Lake Champlain. On September 11, 1814—187 years before the attack on the World Trade Center—British Army and Royal Naval forces attacked a regular American army and navy at Cumberland Bay in Plattsburgh. Although backed by Vermont Militia, the Americans were outnumbered nearly four to one. If the invaders had won, they could have taken Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. This largest and most decisive battle of the War of 1812 determined the future of our nation; it is a story of great courage and human tragedy told by Colonel David Fitz-Enz. Hosted by the Woodstock Historical Society. Woodstock History Center, 26 Elm St, 2:00 pm. Jennie Shurtleff, (802) 457-1822.

October 21 — Book Discussion: Dreams of Trespass by Fatima Mernissi. Part of the Literary Reflections on Islam series. Islam has long provided a source of inspiration through which Muslims experience, understand, and guide their everyday lives. This series, developed jointly by the American Library Association and the NEH, offers literary reflections on Muslim piety and communal concepts such as ethics, governance, knowledge, and identity, and reveals transformations in faith and identity, as Muslims living at different times and in different places have interpreted Islam. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Mary McKenna, (802) 296-2191.

October 22 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Three: "Refuge, Reinvention, and Revolution." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores innovation, interstates, and counter-culture. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Hartland Public Library. Hartland Public Library, 153 US Route 5, 153 Route 5, 6:30 pm. Theresa Gregory, (802) 436-2473.

November 5 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Four: "Doers and Shapers." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores progressivism in education and state law from Act 250 to civil unions. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Hartland Public Library. Hartland Public Library, 153 US Route 5, 6:30 pm. Theresa Gregory, (802) 436-2473.

November 5 — Why Radio? Longtime NPR broadcast journalist Susan Stamberg celebrates the power of radio in a high-tech world, sharing stories from the early days of NPR and more recent radio days, and reflecting on why radio has endured.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

November 11 — Book Discussion: Minaret by Leila Aboulela. Part of the Literary Reflections on Islam series. Islam has long provided a source of inspiration through which Muslims experience, understand, and guide their everyday lives. This series, developed jointly by the American Library Association and the NEH, offers literary reflections on Muslim piety and communal concepts such as ethics, governance, knowledge, and identity, and reveals transformations in faith and identity, as Muslims living at different times and in different places have interpreted Islam. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Mary McKenna, (802) 296 -2191.

November 13 — How to Read the Landscape. Grant Event. This session will illustrate for participants the cultural landscape features, architectural styles, and signs of both natural and cultural agricultural activity that can be found in Norwich. We will use the VT Division for Historic Preservation’s barn census as part of this presentation. Participants will receive a checklist of features to find on their own land, in essence taking an agricultural census of their property. Led by Alan Berolzheimer and Nancy Osgood. Cost: $10 for all three workshops or $5 per workshop. Space is limited and reservations are recommended. Hosted by the Norwich Historical Society. Norwich Historical Society, 277 Main St, 7:00 pm. Norwich Historical Society, (802) 649-0124 or info@norwichhistory.org.

November 19 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Five: "Ceres' Children." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores participatory democracy and ethics in conservation and farming. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Hartland Public Library. Hartland Public Library, 153 US Route 5, 6:30 pm. Theresa Gregory, (802) 436-2473.

December 3 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Six: "People's Power." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores contemporary tensions over energy, independence, climate, and the state's future. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Hartland Public Library. Hartland Public Library, 153 Route 5, 6:30 pm. Theresa Gregory, (802) 436-2473.

December 3 — What the Buddhists Teach: Finding Clarity in Everyday Life. How do we develop not only mindfulness, but a compassionate optimism about a highly imperfect world? Author Dr. Polly Young-Eisendrath discusses the Buddhist model for remaining fully engaged in the ups and downs of everyday life, a model that differs dramatically from traditional Western perspectives.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

January 7 — Georgia O'Keeffe: A Critical Look. Georgia O'Keeffe lived 99 years and produced more than 2,000 works in her 75- year career. James Maroney, the former head of American Paintings at both Sotheby's and Christie's in New York who appraised her estate after her death, presents a critical evaluation of her best work.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

February 4 — Victoria’s Secrets. Middlebury College professor Antonia Losano explains how the Victorian era, the age of staid decorum, also had its guilty pleasures: mysteries, ghost stories, science fiction, imperialist adventure tales, and radical fantasies of gender confusion.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

March 4 — What If Poor Women Ran the World? Labor historian Annelise Orleck tells the story of nine African-American union maids in Las Vegas during the 1970s who challenged welfare cuts and built a long-lasting, vibrant antipoverty program run by poor mothers.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

April 1 — Vermont War Memorials, Statuary, and Cemeteries: from the Revolution to 9/11. In this illustrated talk, Vermont authors Bill Mares and Bill Lipke share Vermont’s commemorative history, from Ethan Allen to the War on Terror Memorial at Camp Johnson in Colchester.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

May 6 — All About Eve. Dartmouth professor of religion Susan Ackerman considers both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the Adam and Eve story and how recent scholarship on women and the Bible pushes us to rethink our common assumptions about Eve.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

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