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Vermont Humanities Events Statewide

Last Updated 4/19/2014 1:40:20 PM

Vermont Humanities Events Statewide     

 

Through Fall 2014— Covered Bridges of Woodstock Exhibit. Grant Event. The exhibit celebrates Woodstock's covered bridges past and present on the occasion of the Taftsville bridge re-opening. Visit www.woodstockhistorical. org or call for hours. Hosted by the Woodstock Historical Society. Woodstock History Center, 26 Elm St. Jennie Shurtleff, (802) 457-1822.

April

April 1–30 — PoemCity 2014. Grant Event. This fifth annual city-wide celebration of poetry honors National Poetry month. Poems are displayed in windows around town and at the library, and lectures, workshops, and readings are offered involving professional and amateur poets. Hosted by the Kellogg-Hubbard Library and supported by a VHC grant. Montpelier, various locations. Rachel Senechal, (802) 223-3338, poemcityvt.wordpress.com.

April 17 — Wonder Film Discussion Series, Part II. A Vermont Reads Event. Join us to view and discuss the 2001 film I Am Sam. A mentally retarded man fights for custody of his 7-year-old daughter, and in the process teaches his coldhearted lawyer the value of love and family. Hosted by the Rockingham Free Public Library. Bellows Falls, Rockingham Free Public Library, 65 Westminster St, 6:00 pm. Samantha Maskell, (802) 463-4270.

April 23 — Book Discussion: The Conference of the Birds by Farid al-Din Attar. Part of the Literary Reflections on Islam series. Islam has long provided a source of inspiration through which Muslims experience, understand, and guide their everyday lives. This series, developed jointly by the American Library Association and the NEH, offers literary reflections on Muslim piety and communal concepts such as ethics, governance, knowledge, and identity, and reveals transformations in faith and identity, as Muslims living at different times and in different places have interpreted Islam. Led by Amer Latif. Hosted by the Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St, 7:00 pm. Jerry J Carbone, (802) 254-5290.

April 23 — Book Discussion: Sizwe’s Test: A Young Man’s Journey Through Africa’s AIDS Epidemic by Jonny Steinberg. Part of the Understanding Post-Colonial Africa series. What many Americans know about contemporary Africa can be summed up in headlines about bloody civil wars and corrupt dictators, child soldiers and “lost boys,” devastating disease, extreme poverty, and unsettling cultural practices. But the issues behind these headlines are far more complex than the popular press can portray. These four books help to introduce post-colonial Africa to the novice and explore some of the continent’s crises in greater depth—including the West’s complicity in them. Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Louise J Murphy, (802) 652-7076.

April 23 — Book Discussion: Welcome to Hard Times by E.L. Doctorow. Part of the Revenge series. What are the causes of revenge? What are the consequences? Is taking revenge ever justified? Explore this most passionate and provocative of human desires through drama, short stories, and novels. The series was created by VHC Scholar Suzanne Brown in conjunction with Quechee Library and first funded by a VHC grant to the library. Led by Mary Hays. Hosted by the Pope Memorial Library. Danville, Pope Memorial Library, 121 Park St, 7:00 pm. Deidre Palmer, (802) 684-2256.

April 23 — Book Discussion: Matryona's Home by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. Part of the Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn series. The series features shorter works by the great Russian writer, dissident, and former Cavendish, Vermont resident and includes his most read and highly regarded novella as well as several of his famous speeches. Led by John R Turner. Hosted by the Kimball Public Library. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073.

April 23 — Vermont Prepares: Disaster Planning for Archival Records. Grant Event. This day-long workshop offered by the Northeast Document Conservation Center is designed for staff at institutions that maintain historical records. Participants will learn to develop emergency plans for their institutions. $25, pre-registration required at http://www.nedcc.org/preservation-training/vermont-program. Hosted by the Vermont Historical Records Advisory Board and supported by a VHC grant. Springfield, River Valley Technical Center, 303 South St, 303 South St. Kim O'Leary, (978) 470 -1010 x226, koleary@nedcc.org.

April 23 — Book Discussion: Wonder. A Vermont Reads Event. Join our all-ages conversation facilitated by the librarian. Bring your reactions and read-alikes and leave with further ideas. Hosted by the Gilbert Hart Library. Wallingford, Gilbert Hart Library, 14 S Main St, 3:30 pm. Wendy Savery, (802) 446-2685.

April 23 — Film Screening: The King's Speech. A Vermont Reads Event. Based on the true story of King George VI, who suffered from a debilitating speech impediment, and his quest to find his voice. Hosted by the Maclure Library. Pittsford, Maclure Library, 840 Arch Street, 1:00 pm and 7:00 pm. Bonnie Stewart, (802) 483-2972.

April 27 — Robert Frost’s Spring Poems at the Dorset Inn.Join Vermont Humanities Council executive director Peter Gilbert for a discussion of three of Frost's greatest poems, each about spring and each warranting a closer look: "Nothing Gold Can Stay," "Two Tramps in Mudtime," and "Mending Wall." Participants may read the poems in advance or read them upon arriving. Peter Gilbert is the literary executor of the Robert Frost Estate. Hosted by the Dorset Village Library. Sunday, April 27, 3:00pm, Dorset Inn Living Room.To learn more, 802.867.5774.

April 27 — Book Discussion: The Life and Times of Michael K. by J. M. Coetzee. Part of the Booker Prize Winners series. Established in 1968, England's Booker Prize is awarded annually to a citizen of the U.K., the Commonwealth, Ireland, Pakistan, or South Africa who has written the year's best novel according to a panel of critics, writers, and academics. In a short 35 years, the Booker has achieved an air of dignity and respect that rivals even the 86-year-old Pulitzer Prize. Graham Swift, who won the Booker in 1996, singled it out as the finest accolade a writer can receive. "It's the one which, if we're completely honest, we most covet." Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Martha Canfield Memorial Free Library. Arlington, Martha Canfield Memorial Free Library, 528 East Arlington Road, 2:00 pm. Phyllis Skidmore, (802) 375-6153.

April 28 — Arming the Union: Vermont Gunmakers and the Technology that Shaped America. During the Civil War, the Union army fielded more than two million men, most of them armed with newly made, highly accurate rifles. In this illustrated lecture, historian and museum curator Carrie Brown explores the critical role that Windsor, Vermont, played in producing technology that won the war and changed American life and popular culture even after the war ended. Hosted by the Milton Public Library. Milton Public Library, 39 Bombardier Rd, 6:30 pm. MaryBeth Peterson, (802) 893-4644.

April 28 — Book Discussion: Before I Say Goodbye by Ruth Picardie. Part of the Memorable Memoirs: Take Two series. Memoirs come in all shapes and sizes, but they all have one thing in common: They are not autobiographies. Rather than a straight chronology of the author’s life, memoirs hone in on a specific feature of that life. The following memoirs use both traditional and unconventional formats to do just that. Led by Jon Margolis. Hosted by the Barton Public Library.  Barton Public Library, 100 Church St, 6:30 pm. Toni Eubanks, (802) 525-6524.

April 30 — Film Screening: I Am Sam. A Vermont Reads Event. A mentally challenged man fights for custody of his 7-year-old daughter, and in the process teaches his cold-hearted lawyer the value of love and family. Hosted by the Maclure Library. Pittsford, Maclure Library, 840 Arch Street, 1:00 pm and 7:00 pm. Bonnie Stewart, (802) 483-2972.

May

May 1 — The Neolithic World of Stone: From Gobekli Tepe to Stonehenge. Art historian Bob Manning will examine two neolithic sites, Stonehenge, and Gobekli Tepe, which predates Stonehenge by 6,000 years. Sharing modern speculation as to their functions, Bob will focus on these “stone circles” as two distinctly different windows through which to view ancient humankind. Hosted by the Jewish Community of Greater Stowe. Stowe, Jewish Community of Greater Stowe, 1189 Cape Cod Road, 3:00 pm. Carole Lichtenstein, (802) 253-7408.

May 1 — Book Discussion: Middlemarch by George Eliot. Part of the B.I.G. (Big, Intense, Good) series. Classic works of literature of a certain size and heft—both literal and figurative— can be a little daunting to tackle on one’s own, and in one big gulp. A multi-session group is the ideal environment in which to relish them—and the rewards are many. Led by Mary Hays. Hosted by the Cobleigh Public Library. Lyndonville, Cobleigh Public Library, 14 Depot St, 7:00 pm. Cindy Karasinski, (802) 626-5475.

May 2 — Alfred Hitchcock and the Art of Suspense. Hitchcock famously said “Some films are slices of life; mine are slices of cake.” His career spanned forty years and many film eras. Film expert Rick Winston will discuss the evolution of Hitchcock’s craft, exploring his favorite themes, his relationship with his collaborators, and his wry sense of humour no matter how grisly the subject matter. By drawing on twelve film clips, starting with his 1925 silent The Lodger and continuing through to his Hollywood classics such as Notorious and Rear Window, Winston will illuminate the arc of Hitchcock’s brilliant career. Hosted by the Friends of the West River Trail. South Londonderry Depot Visitors Center, 34 W River St, 7:00 pm. Sharon Crossman, (802) 824-6246.

May 3 — Inventive Vermonters: A Sampling of Farm Tools and Implements. Vermonters have always been inventive, especially when it comes to agricultural innovations. Time- and labor-saving inventions that ease the hard work of farming have always been important in our rural, agricultural state. In this illustrated lecture, retired engineer Paul Wood presents a sampling of farm tools, implements, and artifacts invented or produced in Vermont, examining their use, uniqueness of design, and the often fascinating stories of the inventors themselves. Hosted by the Deborah Rawson Memorial Library. Jericho, Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, 8 River Rd, 2:00 pm. Holly Hall, (802) 899-4962.

May 3 — Duty’s Faithful Child: A Visit with Louisa May Alcott. Famous as the author of Little Women and other books for young people, Louisa May Alcott was herself a fascinating character. Her life was formed in the intellectual and philosophical hotbed of 19th-century Concord, Massachusetts, home of Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, and her own philosopher father, Amos Bronson Alcott. Jeanne Austin draws on the life and writings of this remarkable woman, shaping them into an exciting and educational living history experience. Hosted by the General Federation of Women's Clubs of Vermont. Ludlow, Okemo Valley Golf Club, 89 Fox Ln, 1:30 pm. Midge Tucker, (802) 672-3086.

May 4 — Meet Eleanor Roosevelt: Wife, Mother, and First Lady. Actress Elena Dodd brings life to Eleanor Roosevelt in this one-woman drama and historical interpretation of the four decades of her marriage to Franklin D. Roosevelt, including her adventures as a controversial First Lady in the 1930s and 1940s but not forgetting her roles as mother and grandmother to a large, lively family. With a frank, often humorous look at some of her struggles, she recalls her years as a timid young wife and mother; her growing involvement in politics, social issues, and the media as first lady; and her gradual emergence as an independent force in both private and public life. A dialogue with the audience follows the presentation, which was researched and written by Josephine Lane and Elena Dodd. Hosted by the Waterbury Public Library. Waterbury, American Legion Waterbury Post 59, 16 Stowe St, 2:00 pm. Elise Werth, (802) 244 -7036.

May 4 — The Old Country Fiddler: Charles Ross Taggart, Vermont’s Traveling Entertainer. Having grown up in Topsham, Vermont, Charles Ross Taggart went on to a forty-year career performing in countless stage shows across the country, including the famous Red Path Chautauqua circuit. A fiddler, piano player, humorist, singer, and ventriloquist, he made at least 25 recordings with the Victor, Edison, and Columbia companies, and appeared in a talking movie picture four years before Al Jolson starred in The Jazz Singer. Fiddler Adam Boyce portrays Mr. Taggart near the end of his career, circa 1936, sharing recollections of his life and career interspersed with live fiddling and humorous sketches. Hosted by the Guilford Historical Society. Guilford, Broad Brook Grange, 3940 Guilford Center Road, 2:00 pm. Fred Humphrey, (802) 257-7306.

May 7 — The Building of Middlebury. Middlebury College professor Glenn Andres illustrates the richness and significance of Middlebury’s buildings. On Saturday, May 10, he leads a walking tour of the sites (2:00-3:30 pm; meet at Middlebury Green bandstand). A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Ilsley Public Library. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main St, 7:00 pm. Chris Kirby, (802) 388-4095.

May 7 — Words We No Longer Use: A Study in Language and Culture. Dr. Ronald Sobel, Senior Rabbi Emeritus of Temple Emanu-El in New York City, the largest synagogue in the world, explores how, from the Biblical period to our own time, language has influenced culture and the way people relate to each other.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Mark Skinner Library. Manchester, First Congregational Church, 7:00 pm. Cindy Waters, (802) 362-2607.

May 7 — From East to West. Pianist and music historian Michael Arnowitt explores the influence of the music of Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and Asia on Western classical composition, performing pieces by Mozart, Mahler, and Debussy.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. St Johnsbury, South Congregational Church, 1052 Main St, 7:00 pm. Robert Joly, (802) 748-8291.

May 7 — The Transcontinental Railroad: America’s Greatest Adventure. Author Martin Sandler describes the extraordinary challenges of building an iron road 1800 miles through mountains, over prairies, and across deserts—all by hand—and discusses how “the greatest public work that mortal man has ever yet accomplished” forever changed the nation.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Essex Junction, Brownell Library, 6 Lincoln St, 7:00 pm. Penelope Pillsbury, (802) 878-6957.

May 7 — Classic Films of Hollywood. Using clips from twelve of his favorite films, film expert Rick Winston considers some of the elements of classic films from Hollywood’s Golden Age, including writing, acting, direction, and cinematography.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Goodrich Memorial Library. Newport, Goodrich Memorial Library, 202 Main St, 7:00 pm. Carol Nicholson, (802) 334-7902.

May 7 — The Memoir Boom: Who, What, Why. Dartmouth professor and experimental memoirist Irene Kacandes discusses current approaches to life writing and considers why we continue to love reading about others’ lives.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Rutland Free Library. Rutland Free Library, 10 Court St, 7:00 pm. Randal Smathers, (802) 773-1860.

May 7 — The Wyeths: First Family of American Art. Shelburne Museum director Thomas Denenberg discusses the Wyeths—N. C. (1882–1945), Andrew (1917–2009), and Jamie (b. 1946)—and offers new perspectives on these three painters who have shaped the way Americans view their world.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Montpelier, Kellogg- Hubbard Library, 135 Main St, 7:00 pm. Rachel Senechal, (802) 223-3338.

 May 7 — Soft Versus Hard Power in American Foreign Policy: Finding the Right Mix. Pulitzer-Prize-winning journalist and author Tom Powers examines America’s not always successful attempts between the Cold War and today to find the right balance in foreign policy between soft power and military might.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St, 7:00 pm. Jerry J Carbone, (802) 254-5290 x101.

May 7 — The History of Herbal Medicine in America. Expert herbalist Rosemary Gladstar examines the early history of herbalism in America and how herbs play a role in healthcare today.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Congregational Church, 15 Church St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

May 7 — Poetry Adventure. A Vermont Reads Event. Join SBHS students and community members for a discussion of poems from Poetry 180 led by English teacher Joyce Sheehey. You don't have to read all the poems in the book to participate! Copies of the anthology are available to borrow from the library. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 7:00 pm. Louise Murphy, (802) 652 -7480.

May 7 — Book Discussion: Second Nature: A Gardener’s Education by Michael Pollan. Part of the Farms and Gardens series. Vermonters know as well as anyone the rich metaphors inherent in farming and gardening. These authors dig deep to explore the philosophical roots, family dynamics, and personal enrichment associated with tending and growing. Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the South Hero Community Library. South Hero Community Library, 75 South St, 6:00 pm. Carolyn Brennan, (802) 372-6209.

May 7 — "What is Kindness" Art Show Open House. A Vermont Reads Event. Help celebrate our challenge: to create a piece of artwork that shows what kindness looks like. There will be photographs, paintings, and drawings by adults and elementary and middle school students. The artwork will be on display the month of May. Hosted by the Maclure Library. Pittsford, Maclure Library, 840 Arch Street, 6:00 pm. Bonnie Stewart, (802) 483-2972.

May 7 — Book Discussion: Wonder. A Vermont Reads Event. Join us for an evening of art, friends, and discussion to celebrate kindness and the story of Auggie. Discussion led by OVUHS teacher Michael Dwyer. Hosted by the Maclure Library. Pittsford, Maclure Library,  840 Arch Street, 6:30 pm. Bonnie Stewart, (802) 483-2972.

May 8 — More than Books: Reflections on Libraries, Community and Historic Preservation. Museum scholar, preservationist and photographer Bill Hosley examines almost 200 years of American library history with a special focus on New England and its many municipal and research libraries. This armchair tour and examination of library history reminds us of the richness of New England’s (and Vermont’s) heritage and the states’ commitment to life-learning and broad social access to ideas. Hosted by the Town of Rockingham. Bellows Falls, Rockingham Free Public Library, 65 Westminster St, 7:00 pm. Christy Hotaling, (802) 463-3456 x112.

May 8 — Vermont Prepares: Disaster Planning for Archival Records. Grant Event. This day-long workshop offered by the Northeast Document Conservation Center is designed for staff at institutions that maintain historical records. Participants will learn to develop emergency plans for their institutions. $25, pre-registration required at http://www.nedcc.org/preservation-training/vermont-program Hosted by the Vermont Historical Records Advisory Board and supported by a VHC gran.. Barre, Vermont Historical Society, 60 Washington St. Kim O'Leary, (978) 470 -1010 x226, koleary@nedcc.org.

May 11 — Book Discussion: The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy. Part of the Booker Prize Winners series. Established in 1968, England's Booker Prize is awarded annually to a citizen of the U.K., the Commonwealth, Ireland, Pakistan, or South Africa who has written the year's best novel according to a panel of critics, writers, and academics. In a short 35 years, the Booker has achieved an air of dignity and respect that rivals even the 86-year-old Pulitzer Prize. Graham Swift, who won the Booker in 1996, singled it out as the finest accolade a writer can receive. "It's the one which, if we're completely honest, we most covet." Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Martha Canfield Memorial Free Library. Arlington, Martha Canfield Memorial Free Library, 528 East Arlington Rd, 2:00 pm. Phyllis Skidmore, (802) 375-6153.

May 13 — The Vermont Civil War Songbook. Dressed in period costume, singer/researcher Linda Radtke shares songs from Vermont during the Civil War period, with engaging commentary and letters from Vermont soldiers. Seldom-heard songs from the Vermont Historical Society include the comic but poignant "Grafted into the Army," "Yankee Robinson at Bull Run," "Neath the Pines of Vermont" (in which a soldier returns home to die), a satirical song about Jefferson Davis, and sentimental ballads from Vermont during the period. Linda Radtke is joined by pianist Arthur Zorn in this program for all audiences that brings the Civil War period in Vermont to life through music and letters. Hosted by the Fairfax Community Library. Fairfax Community Library, 75 Hunt St, 6:30 pm. Annette Hansen, (802) 849-2420.

May 14 — Book Discussion: Snow by Orhan Pamuk. Part of the Literary Reflections on Islam series. Islam has long provided a source of inspiration through which Muslims experience, understand, and guide their everyday lives. This series, developed jointly by the American Library Association and the NEH, offers literary reflections on Muslim piety and communal concepts such as ethics, governance, knowledge, and identity, and reveals transformations in faith and identity, as Muslims living at different times and in different places have interpreted Islam. Led by Amer Latif. Hosted by the Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St,  7:00 pm. Jerry J Carbone, (802) 254 -5290.

May 14 — Vermont History through Song. Singer and researcher Linda Radtke, joined by pianist Arthur Zorn, brings Vermont history to life with engaging commentary about the songs found in the Vermont Historical Society's collection of sheet music. Dressed in period costume, Ms. Radtke takes listeners through state history, using the songs Vermonters published in their communities. Hosted by the Addison County Retired Teachers Association. Bristol, Howden Hall, 19 West St, 10:30 am. Susanne Slayton, (802) 989-7189.

May 15 — Bringing Wonder to Life. A Vermont Reads Event. Sam Drazin of Changing Perspectives will use his personal experiences to help participants in this all-ages program learn more about the challenges faced by Auggie, the main character of Wonder. Hosted by the Highgate Elementary School. Highgate Center, Highgate Elementary School Library, 219 Gore Road, 6:30 pm. Kelly Thomas, (802) 868-4170.

May 16 — Vermont Prepares: Disaster Planning for Archival Records. Grant Event. This day-long workshop offered by the Northeast Document Conservation Center is designed for staff at institutions that maintain historical records. Participants will learn to develop emergency plans for their institutions. $25, pre-registration required at http://www.nedcc.org/preservation-training/vermont-program. Hosted by the Vermont Historical Records Advisory Board and supported by a VHC grant. Shelburne Town Hall, 5376 Shelburne Rd. Kim O'Leary, (978) 470 -1010 x226, koleary@nedcc.org.

May 18 — A High Price to Pay, A Heavy Burden to Bear: One Family’s Civil War Story. Abel Morrill, Sr., was an early settler of Cabot, Vermont. He was a respected farmer and maple sugar producer for much of the 19th century. His story reflects the hardship and heartbreak suffered by those who lived at the time of America’s greatest conflict, the Civil War. David Book’s portrayal of Abel Morrill profiles life before the war and life as it was affected by the war. Drawing on primary resources, Book’s monologue describes with historical accuracy life in mid-19th century Vermont and is a story that could be repeated by many families in every town in Vermont during this era. Hosted by the Hartland Historical Society. Hartland Public Library, 153 Route 5, 2:00 pm. Carol Mowry, (802) 436-3383.

May 18 — Lincoln and Vermont. Beginning with Lincoln’s preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, and continuing through to the consecration of the National Soldiers Cemetery at Gettysburg, historian Howard Coffin traces how Lincoln’s leadership of the Federal war effort and his political canniness shaped the relationship between the president and Vermont, a state Lincoln admired though never visited. Hosted by the Swanton Historical Society. Swanton, Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge, 29 Tabor Rd, 2:00 pm. Rebecca Rupp, (802) 868-2879.

May 20 — Book Discussion: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. Part of the Retellings series. These novels all re-imagine classics works of fiction, retelling them from a different character's persepective. Led by Cheryl Heneveld. Hosted by the Enosburgh Public Library. Enosburg Falls, Enosburgh Public Library, 241 Main St, 6:30 pm. Maria Harris, (802) 933-2328.

May 21 — Beatrix Potter Revisited. Using books, props, and bibliography, Helene Lang presents the life of Beatrix Potter, highlighting her artistic talent, her writing ability where every word is appropriate and perfectly arranged, and finally, her years as a countrywoman raising Herdwick sheep. The presentation takes her from her Victorian childhood, through the years of her little books, to her final thirty years of farming in England's Lake District. Hosted by the Ilsley Public Library. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main St, 4:00 pm. Chris Kirby, (802) 388-4095.

May 21 — Book Discussion: The Sweet Hereafter by Russell Banks. Part of the Revenge series. What are the causes of revenge? What are the consequences? Is taking revenge ever justified? Explore this most passionate and provocative of human desires through drama, short stories, and novels. The series was created by VHC Scholar Suzanne Brown in conjunction with Quechee Library and first funded by a VHC grant to the library. Led by Mary Hays. Hosted by the Pope Memorial Library. Danville, Pope Memorial Library, 121 Park St, 7:00 pm. Deidre Palmer, (802) 684-2256.

May 21 — Book Discussion: A Country Year by Sue Hubbell. Part of the Farms and Gardens series. Vermonters know as well as anyone the rich metaphors inherent in farming and gardening. These authors dig deep to explore the philosophical roots, family dynamics, and personal enrichment associated with tending and growing. Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the South Hero Community Library. South Hero Community Library, 75 South St, 6:00 pm. Carolyn Brennan, (802) 372-6209.

May 22 — Alfred Hitchcock and the Art of Suspense. Hitchcock famously said “Some films are slices of life; mine are slices of cake.” His career spanned forty years and many film eras. Film expert Rick Winston will discuss the evolution of Hitchcock’s craft, exploring his favorite themes, his relationship with his collaborators, and his wry sense of humour no matter how grisly the subject matter. By drawing on twelve film clips, starting with his 1925 silent The Lodger and continuing through to his Hollywood classics such as Notorious and Rear Window, Winston will illuminate the arc of Hitchcock’s brilliant career. Hosted by the Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St, 7:30 pm. Library, (802) 254-5290.

May 25 — Book Discussion: The English Patient by Michael Ondaatje. Part of the Booker Prize Winners series. Established in 1968, England's Booker Prize is awarded annually to a citizen of the U.K., the Commonwealth, Ireland, Pakistan, or South Africa who has written the year's best novel according to a panel of critics, writers, and academics. In a short 35 years, the Booker has achieved an air of dignity and respect that rivals even the 86-year-old Pulitzer Prize. Graham Swift, who won the Booker in 1996, singled it out as the finest accolade a writer can receive. "It's the one which, if we're completely honest, we most covet." Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Martha Canfield Memorial Free Library. Arlington, Martha Canfield Memorial Free Library, 528 East Arlington Rd, 2:00 pm. Phyllis Skidmore, (802) 375-6153.

May 26 — The Changing Music Scene of the 1940s. Catamount Arts’ Martin Bryan takes a look at the popular music scene of the 1940s—how it was affected by war, the musicians’ union, and the war’s aftermath—and how music styles evolved from the beginning of the decade to its end. Bryan’s talk includes selections from original 78 rpm recordings, ranging from Big Band swing to wartime music, from popular Broadway musicals to bebop, and more. Americans marched off to war and returned to a changed society; Bryan documents that time through its music. Hosted by the Enosburg Historical Society. Enosburg Falls, United Methodist Church, Parlor, 245 Church St, 7:00 pm. Janice Geraw, (802) 933-2102.

May 28 — Book Discussion: Dreams of Trespass by Fatima Mernissi. Part of the Literary Reflections on Islam series. Islam has long provided a source of inspiration through which Muslims experience, understand, and guide their everyday lives. This series, developed jointly by the American Library Association and the NEH, offers literary reflections on Muslim piety and communal concepts such as ethics, governance, knowledge, and identity, and reveals transformations in faith and identity, as Muslims living at different times and in different places have interpreted Islam. Led by Amer Latif. Hosted by the Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St, 7:00 pm. Jerry J Carbone, (802) 254-5290.

May 28 — Book Discussion: What is the What by Dave Eggers. Part of the Understanding Post-Colonial Africa series. What many Americans know about contemporary Africa can be summed up in headlines about bloody civil wars and corrupt dictators, child soldiers and “lost boys,” devastating disease, extreme poverty, and unsettling cultural practices. But the issues behind these headlines are far more complex than the popular press can portray. These four books help to introduce post-colonial Africa to the novice and explore some of the continent’s crises in greater depth—including the West’s complicity in them. Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Louise J Murphy, (802) 652-7076.

May 28 — Book Discussion: One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. Part of the Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn series. The series features shorter works by the great Russian writer, dissident, and former Cavendish, Vermont resident and includes his most read and highly regarded novella as well as several of his famous speeches. Led by John R Turner. Hosted by the Kimball Public Library. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073.

June

June 4 — Redeemer President: The Significance of Jimmy Carter.  Dartmouth professor of American religious history Randall Balmer examines the rise of the Religious Right and the life and times of Jimmy Carter, a Southern Baptist Sunday school teacher elected president in 1976 with the support of evangelicals, most of whom were politically active for the first time but many of whom turned against him four years later.A First Wednesdays lecture (rescheduled from February 5). Hosted by the Ilsley Public Library. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main St, 7:00 pm. Chris Kirby, (802) 388-4095.

June 4 — The Examined Life. Socrates famously proclaimed, "The unexamined life is not worth living." Philosophy and classics scholar Susanne Claxton explores what constitutes the examined life and how we, in the twenty-first century, may best pursue it.A First Wednesdays lecture (rescheduled from February 5). Hosted by the Mark Skinner Library. Manchester, First Congregational Church, 7:00 pm. Cindy Waters, (802) 362-2607.

June 4 — The Life and Times of Thelonious Monk. Artistic Director of the Vermont Jazz Center Eugene Uman considers the life and improvisational style of American jazz pianist and composer Thelonius Monk, widely considered one of the giants of American music.A First Wednesdays lecture (rescheduled from February 5). Hosted by the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 1171 Main St, 7:00 pm. Robert Joly, (802) 748-8291.

June 4 — The Six Wives of Henry VIII. Author and scholar Kavita Finn examines the lives of Catherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn, Jane Seymour, Anne of Cleves, Katherine Howard, and Katherine Parr—their backgrounds, their marriages to the king, and how they have been depicted both during their time and today.A First Wednesdays lecture (rescheduled from February 5). Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Congregational Church, 15 Church St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

June 4 — Fallingwater: The Story and the Controversy. Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater is widely considered one of the finest masterpieces of American architecture. H. Nicholas Muller, III, retired executive director of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, shares the story—and controversy—behind the house.A First Wednesdays lecture (rescheduled from April 2). Hosted by the Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St, 7:00 pm. Jerry J Carbone, (802) 254-5290 x101.

June 5 — Alfred Hitchcock and the Art of Suspense. Hitchcock famously said “Some films are slices of life; mine are slices of cake.” His career spanned forty years and many film eras. Film expert Rick Winston will discuss the evolution of Hitchcock’s craft, exploring his favorite themes, his relationship with his collaborators, and his wry sense of humour no matter how grisly the subject matter. By drawing on twelve film clips, starting with his 1925 silent The Lodger and continuing through to his Hollywood classics such as Notorious and Rear Window, Winston will illuminate the arc of Hitchcock’s brilliant career. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin Meeting Room, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 7:30 pm. Krista Malaney, (802) 264-5100. Must R.S.V.P.

June 8 — The Neolithic World of Stone: From Gobekli Tepe to Stonehenge. Art historian Bob Manning will examine two neolithic sites, Stonehenge, and Gobekli Tepe, which predates Stonehenge by 6,000 years. Sharing modern speculation as to their functions, Bob will focus on these “stone circles” as two distinctly different windows through which to view ancient humankind. Hosted by the Mark Skinner Library. Manchester Center, Equinox Village, 49 Maple St, 4:00 pm. Cindy Waters, (802) 362-2607.

June 8 — Mad Matt the Democrat. In this talk, Vincent Feeney discusses Matthew Lyon— indentured servant, Green Mountain Boy, son-in-law to Thomas Chittenden, land speculator, entrepreneur, and one of the most colorful characters in Vermont's early years. Perhaps best remembered for his imprisonment under the Alien and Sedition Acts, and subsequent re-election while in jail, his life not only exemplified the promise of possibility in the then-new United States, but also reflected the political tensions of the times. Hosted by the Swanton Historical Society. Swanton, Holy Trinity Episcoal Church, 38 Grand Ave, 2:00 pm. Rebecca Rupp, (802) 868-2879.

June 9 — Inventive Vermonters: A Sampling of Farm Tools and Implements. Vermonters have always been inventive, especially when it comes to agricultural innovations. Time- and labor-saving inventions that ease the hard work of farming have always been important in our rural, agricultural state. In this illustrated lecture, retired engineer Paul Wood presents a sampling of farm tools, implements, and artifacts invented or produced in Vermont, examining their use, uniqueness of design, and the often fascinating stories of the inventors themselves. Hosted by the Hardwick Historical Society. Hardwick Town House, 127 Church Street, 7:00 pm. Lorraine Hussey, (802) 472-5903.

June 10 — Arming the Union: Vermont Gunmakers and the Technology that Shaped America. During the Civil War, the Union army fielded more than two million men, most of them armed with newlymade, highly accurate rifles. In this illustrated lecture, historian and museum curator Carrie Brown explores the critical role that Windsor, Vermont, played in producing technology that won the war and changed American life and popular culture even after the war ended. Hosted by the Green Mountain Civil War Roundtable. White River Junction, Hotel Coolidge, 39 S Main St, 7:00 pm. Jack Anderson, (802) 457-2398.

June 11 — Book Discussion: Minaret by Leila Aboulela. Part of the Literary Reflections on Islam series. Islam has long provided a source of inspiration through which Muslims experience, understand, and guide their everyday lives. This series, developed jointly by the American Library Association and the NEH, offers literary reflections on Muslim piety and communal concepts such as ethics, governance, knowledge, and identity, and reveals transformations in faith and identity, as Muslims living at different times and in different places have interpreted Islam. Led by Amer Latif. Hosted by the Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St,  7:00 pm. Jerry J Carbone, (802) 254 -5290.

June 11 — Book Discussion: My Garden (Book) by Jamaica Kincaid. Part of the Farms and Gardens series. Vermonters know as well as anyone the rich metaphors inherent in farming and gardening. These authors dig deep to explore the philosophical roots, family dynamics, and personal enrichment associated with tending and growing. Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the South Hero Community Library. South Hero Community Library, 75 South St, 6:00 pm. Carolyn Brennan, (802) 372-6209.

June 11 — A High Price to Pay, A Heavy Burden to Bear: One Family’s Civil War Story. Abel Morrill, Sr., was an early settler of Cabot, Vermont. He was a respected farmer and maple sugar producer for much of the 19th century. His story reflects the hardship and heartbreak suffered by those who lived at the time of America’s greatest conflict, the Civil War. David Book’s portrayal of Abel Morrill profiles life before the war and life as it was affected by the war. Drawing on primary resources, Book’s monologue describes with historical accuracy life in mid-19th century Vermont and is a story that could be repeated by many families in every town in Vermont during this era. Hosted by the Bennington Senior Center. Bennington Senior Center, 124 Pleasant St, 1:00 pm. Susan Hoag, (802) 442-1052.

June 16 — Book Discussion: Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America by Barbara Ehrenreich. Part of the Blue Collar America series. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Burnham Memorial Library. Colchester, Burnham Memorial Library, 898 Main St, 6:00 pm. Kelly Tomaseski, (802) 264-5660.

June 17 — Book Discussion: Finn by John Clinch. Part of the Retellings series. These novels all re-imagine classics works of fiction, retelling them from a different character's persepective. Led by Cheryl Heneveld. Hosted by the Enosburgh Public Library. Enosburg Falls, Enosburgh Public Library, 241 Main St, 6:30 pm. Maria Harris, (802) 933 -2328.

June 18 — Book Discussion: 1970 Nobel Lecture by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, 1978 Harvard Class Day Address by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. Part of the Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn series. The series features shorter works by the great Russian writer, dissident, and former Cavendish, Vermont resident and includes his most read and highly regarded novella as well as several of his famous speeches. Led by John R Turner. Hosted by the Kimball Public Library. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073.

June 18 — Book Discussion: Wonder. A Vermont Reads Event. Books will be available on loan at the library starting 5/14. Refreshments will be provided for this adult book discussion. Hosted by the Wardsboro Public Library. Wardsboro Public Library, 170 Main St, 6:00 pm. Jill Dean, (802) 896-6988.

June 19 — Book Discussion: Indian Killer by Sherman Alexie. Part of the A Mysterious Lens on American Culture series. In these mysteries, mayhem and murder play out against a cultural/ethnic backdrop—illuminating more than simply whodunnit. Led by William Tortolano. Hosted by the North Hero Public Library. North Hero Public Library, 3195 Us Route 2, 7:00 pm. Judy Poquette, (802) 372-5458.

June 23 — Inventive Vermonters: A Sampling of Farm Tools and Implements. Vermonters have always been inventive, especially when it comes to agricultural innovations. Time- and labor-saving inventions that ease the hard work of farming have always been important in our rural, agricultural state. In this illustrated lecture, retired engineer Paul Wood presents a sampling of farm tools, implements, and artifacts invented or produced in Vermont, examining their use, uniqueness of design, and the often fascinating stories of the inventors themselves. Hosted by the Woodstock Historical Society. Woodstock Historical Society, 26 Elm St, 7:00 pm. Jennie Shurtleff, (802) 457-1822.

June 23 — Book Discussion: Black Robe by Brian Moore. Part of the When Cultures Meet: First Contact in the Lake Champlain Basin series. This series commemorates the Lake Champlain Quadricentennial in 2009. In 1609, Frenchman Samuel de Champlain became the first European to visit the 110-mile lake that now bears his name. (In 1608, Champlain had founded Quebec City.) In fiction and nonfiction, the series explores the ramifications of contact between Europeans and the native inhabitants in the Champlain Basin and New England generally, and the ensuing history of the region. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Quechee Library. Quechee, Library, 1957 Main Street, 4:30 pm. Kate Schaal, (802) 295-1232.

June 25 — Book Discussion: Zenzele: A Letter for My Daughter by J. Nozipo Maraire. Part of the Understanding Post-Colonial Africa series. What many Americans know about contemporary Africa can be summed up in headlines about bloody civil wars and corrupt dictators, child soldiers and “lost boys,” devastating disease, extreme poverty, and unsettling cultural practices. But the issues behind these headlines are far more complex than the popular press can portray. These four books help to introduce post-colonial Africa to the novice and explore some of the continent’s crises in greater depth—including the West’s complicity in them. Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Louise J Murphy, (802) 652-7076.

June 25 — Book Discussion: Here and Nowhere Else: Late Seasons of a Farm and Its Family by Jane Brox. Part of the Farms and Gardens series. Vermonters know as well as anyone the rich metaphors inherent in farming and gardening. These authors dig deep to explore the philosophical roots, family dynamics, and personal enrichment associated with tending and growing. Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the South Hero Community Library. South Hero Community Library, 75 South St, 6:00 pm. Carolyn Brennan, (802) 372-6209.

June 30 — Vermont Prepares: Disaster Planning for Archival Records. Grant Event. This day-long workshop offered by the Northeast Document Conservation Center is designed for staff at institutions that maintain historical records. Participants will learn to develop emergency plans for their institutions. $25, pre-registration required at http://www.nedcc.org/preservation-training/vermont-program. Hosted by the Vermont Historical Records Advisory Board and supported by a VHC grant. St Johnsbury, Fairbanks Museum and Planetarium, 1302 Main St. Kim O'Leary, (978) 470-1010 x226, koleary@nedcc.org.

July

July 2 — Book Discussion: Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert. Part of the The Romantic Ideal series. The characters in these works seek out their ideal of love, happiness, and fulfillment with consequences that are by turns bittersweet, tragic, noble, unconventional, and even comic. But can an ideal ever be met? Led by Richard M Wizansky. Hosted by the Dover Free Library. East Dover, Dover Free Library, 22 Holland Rd, 7:00 pm. John Flores, (802) 348-7488.

July 6 — Vermont and the Civil War. From Cedar Creek to Gettysburg, Vermonters were central to the Union cause. Vermont author and Civil War historian Howard Coffin addresses the Vermont contribution to the Civil War. Hosted by the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation. Plymouth, President Calvin Coolidge Museum & Education Center, 3780 Route 100A, 2:00 pm. William Jenney, (802) 672-3773.

July 10 — Book Discussion: Ritual Bath by Faye Kellerman. Part of the A Mysterious Lens on American Culture series. In these mysteries, mayhem and murder play out against a cultural/ethnic backdrop—illuminating more than simply whodunnit. Led by William Tortolano. Hosted by the North Hero Public Library. North Hero Public Library, 3195 Us Route 2, 7:00 pm. Judy Poquette, (802) 372-5458.

July 14 — Book Discussion: White Devil: A True Story of War, Savagery, and Vengeance in Colonial America by Stephen Brumwell. Part of the When Cultures Meet: First Contact in the Lake Champlain Basin series. This series commemorates the Lake Champlain Quadricentennial in 2009. In 1609, Frenchman Samuel de Champlain became the first European to visit the 110- mile lake that now bears his name. (In 1608, Champlain had founded Quebec City.) In fiction and nonfiction, the series explores the ramifications of contact between Europeans and the native inhabitants in the Champlain Basin and New England generally, and the ensuing history of the region. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Quechee Library. Quechee, Library, 1957 Main Street, 4:30 pm. Kate Schaal, (802) 295-1232.

July 16 — Book Discussion: Middlemarch by George Eliot. Part of the B.I.G. (Big, Intense, Good) series. Classic works of literature of a certain size and heft—both literal and figurative— can be a little daunting to tackle on one’s own, and in one big gulp. A multi-session group is the ideal environment in which to relish them—and the rewards are many. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Kimball Public Library. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073.

July 17 — The Old Country Fiddler: Charles Ross Taggart, Vermont’s Traveling Entertainer. Having grown up in Topsham, Vermont, Charles Ross Taggart went on to a forty-year career performing in countless stage shows across the country, including the famous Red Path Chautauqua circuit. A fiddler, piano player, humorist, singer, and ventriloquist, he made at least 25 recordings with the Victor, Edison, and Columbia companies, and appeared in a talking movie picture four years before Al Jolson starred in The Jazz Singer. Fiddler Adam Boyce portrays Mr. Taggart near the end of his career, circa 1936, sharing recollections of his life and career interspersed with live fiddling and humorous sketches. Hosted by the Dorset Historical Society. Dorset, Bley House Museum, Route 30 At Kent Hill Road, 12:00 pm. Judith Harwood, (802) 362-3708.

July 21 — Book Discussion: Empire Falls by Richard Russo. Part of the Blue Collar America series. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Burnham Memorial Library. Colchester, Burnham Memorial Library, 898 Main St, 6:00 pm. Kelly Tomaseski, (802) 264-5660.

July 23 — Book Discussion: Summer by Edith Wharton. Part of the The Romantic Ideal series. The characters in these works seek out their ideal of love, happiness, and fulfillment with consequences that are by turns bittersweet, tragic, noble, unconventional, and even comic. But can an ideal ever be met? Led by Richard M Wizansky. Hosted by the Dover Free Library. East Dover, Dover Free Library, 22 Holland Rd, 7:00 pm. John Flores, (802) 348-7488.

July 30 — Inventive Vermonters: A Sampling of Farm Tools and Implements. Vermonters have always been inventive, especially when it comes to agricultural innovations. Time- and labor-saving inventions that ease the hard work of farming have always been important in our rural, agricultural state. In this illustrated lecture, retired engineer Paul Wood presents a sampling of farm tools, implements, and artifacts invented or produced in Vermont, examining their use, uniqueness of design, and the often fascinating stories of the inventors themselves. Hosted by the Waterbury Historical Society. Waterbury Center Community Church, 3582 Waterbury-Stowe Rd, 7:30 pm. Cindy Parks, (802) 585-4913.

July 31 — Book Discussion: Blanche Cleans Up by Barbara Neely. Part of the A Mysterious Lens on American Culture series. In these mysteries, mayhem and murder play out against a cultural/ethnic backdrop—illuminating more than simply whodunnit. Led by William Tortolano. Hosted by the North Hero Public Library. North Hero Public Library, 3195 Us Route 2, 7:00 pm. Judy Poquette, (802) 372-5458.

August

August 6 — Book Discussion: Mating by Norman Rush. Part of the The Romantic Ideal series. The characters in these works seek out their ideal of love, happiness, and fulfillment with consequences that are by turns bittersweet, tragic, noble, unconventional, and even comic. But can an ideal ever be met? Led by Richard M Wizansky. Hosted by the Dover Free Library. East Dover, Dover Free Library, 22 Holland Rd, 7:00 pm. John Flores, (802) 348-7488.

August 9 — A High Price to Pay, A Heavy Burden to Bear: One Family’s Civil War Story. Abel Morrill, Sr., was an early settler of Cabot, Vermont. He was a respected farmer and maple sugar producer for much of the 19th century. His story reflects the hardship and heartbreak suffered by those who lived at the time of America’s greatest conflict, the Civil War. David Book’s portrayal of Abel Morrill profiles life before the war and life as it was affected by the war. Drawing on primary resources, Book’s monologue describes with historical accuracy life in mid-19th century Vermont and is a story that could be repeated by many families in every town in Vermont during this era. Hosted by the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation. Plymouth, President Calvin Coolidge Museum & Education Center, 3780 Route 100A, 2:00 pm. William Jenney, (802) 672-3773.

August 11 — Book Discussion: Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England by William Cronon. Part of the When Cultures Meet: First Contact in the Lake Champlain Basin series. This series commemorates the Lake Champlain Quadricentennial in 2009. In 1609, Frenchman Samuel de Champlain became the first European to visit the 110- mile lake that now bears his name. (In 1608, Champlain had founded Quebec City.) In fiction and nonfiction, the series explores the ramifications of contact between Europeans and the native inhabitants in the Champlain Basin and New England generally, and the ensuing history of the region. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Quechee Library. Quechee, Library, 1957 Main Street, 4:30 pm. Kate Schaal, (802) 295-1232.

August 13 — Book Discussion: Middlemarch by George Eliot. Part of the B.I.G. (Big, Intense, Good) series. Classic works of literature of a certain size and heft—both literal and figurative— can be a little daunting to tackle on one’s own, and in one big gulp. A multi-session group is the ideal environment in which to relish them—and the rewards are many. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Kimball Public Library. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073.

August 15 — A Sense of Place: Vermont's Farm Legacy. The character of a place is shaped by its cultural heritage and folklife, the informal traditions of family and community that guide the ways in which a person plans a meal, treats a neighbor, or understands civic responsibility. In Vermont the cultural legacy of farming has strongly influenced the identity of Vermonters, and it is these distinctive traditions, which have persisted even with the decline in farm numbers, that help make the state unique. This lecture by Gregory Sharrow explores the fabric of farm culture in the past and probes its relationship to the world of Vermont today. Hosted by the Landgrove Meetinghouse. Landgrove Meetinghouse, 88 Landgrove Rd, 4:00 pm. Priscilla Grayson, (802) 824-6867.

August 15 — The Roaring '20s in Fox Trot Tempo. Perhaps more than any other decade, the history of the 1920s is captured in the popular music of the day. From Lindbergh to Ford's Model A, from the Scopes Trial to the Florida land boom and the crossword puzzle craze, the music of the 1920s tells the story. This lecture by Martin Bryan traces historical events, from the sublime to the ridiculous, and illustrates them with archival recordings. Hosted by the West Fairlee Historical Society. West Fairlee, Congregational Church, 954 Vt Rte 113, 7:00 pm. Bonnie Cray, (802) 333-9655.

August 18 — Book Discussion: What Work Is by Philip Levine. Part of the Blue Collar America series. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Burnham Memorial Library. Colchester, Burnham Memorial Library, 898 Main St, 6:00 pm. Kelly Tomaseski, (802) 264-5660.

August 20 — Book Discussion: Later Life by A.R. Gurney. Part of the The Romantic Ideal series. The characters in these works seek out their ideal of love, happiness, and fulfillment with consequences that are by turns bittersweet, tragic, noble, unconventional, and even comic. But can an ideal ever be met? Led by Richard M Wizansky. Hosted by the Dover Free Library. East Dover, Dover Free Library, 22 Holland Rd, 7:00 pm. John Flores, (802) 348-7488.

August 21 — Book Discussion: Blood of the Prodigal by P. L. Gaus. Part of the A Mysterious Lens on American Culture series. In these mysteries, mayhem and murder play out against a cultural/ethnic backdrop—illuminating more than simply whodunnit. Led by William Tortolano. Hosted by the North Hero Public Library. North Hero Public Library, 3195 Us Route 2, 7:00 pm. Judy Poquette, (802) 372-5458.

August 25 — Beatrix Potter Revisited. Using books, props, and bibliography, Helene Lang presents the life of Beatrix Potter, highlighting her artistic talent, her writing ability where every word is appropriate and perfectly arranged, and finally, her years as a countrywoman raising Herdwick sheep. The presentation takes her from her Victorian childhood, through the years of her little books, to her final thirty years of farming in England's Lake District. Hosted by the Enosburg Historical Society. Enosburg Falls, West Enosburg United Methodist Church, 1725 Tyler Branch Rd, 7:00 pm. Shirley Duso, (802) 933-4394.

September

September 3 — The Battle of Lake Champlain. On September 11, 1814—187 years before the attack on the World Trade Center—British Army and Royal Naval forces attacked a regular American army and navy at Cumberland Bay in Plattsburgh. Although backed by Vermont Militia, the Americans were outnumbered nearly four to one. If the invaders had won, they could have taken Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. This largest and most decisive battle of the War of 1812 determined the future of our nation; it is a story of great courage and human tragedy told by Colonel David Fitz-Enz. Hosted by the Milton Historical Society and Museum. Milton Historical Society and Museum, 13 School Street, 7:00 pm. Allison Belisle, (802) 363-2598.

September 10 — Book Discussion: Middlemarch by George Eliot. Part of the B.I.G. (Big, Intense, Good) series. Classic works of literature of a certain size and heft—both literal and figurative— can be a little daunting to tackle on one’s own, and in one big gulp. A multi-session group is the ideal environment in which to relish them—and the rewards are many. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Kimball Public Library. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073.

September 15 — Book Discussion: The Cliff Walk: A Memoir of a Job Lost and a Life Found by Don Snyder. Part of the Blue Collar America series. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Burnham Memorial Library. Colchester, Burnham Memorial Library, 898 Main St, 6:00 pm. Kelly Tomaseski, (802) 264-5660.

September 15 — A Sense of Place: Vermont's Farm Legacy. The character of a place is shaped by its cultural heritage and folklife, the informal traditions of family and community that guide the ways in which a person plans a meal, treats a neighbor, or understands civic responsibility. In Vermont the cultural legacy of farming has strongly influenced the identity of Vermonters, and it is these distinctive traditions, which have persisted even with the decline in farm numbers, that help make the state unique. This lecture by Gregory Sharrow explores the fabric of farm culture in the past and probes its relationship to the world of Vermont today. Hosted by the Monkton Museum and Historical Society. Monkton, Fire Station, 3747 States Prison Hollow Rd, 7:00 pm. Gill B Coates, (802) 482-2277.

September 15 — Anne Frank’s Neighbors: What Did They Do? . Although Anne Frank’s Diary is the most widely read nonfiction book in the world after the Bible, little attention has been paid to her neighbors—the people who lived alongside the Jewish population as persecution intensified. Mary Fillmore examines the choices they faced and the decisions they made in the face of those choices. Why did some people ignore the situation, while others felt compelled to resist? What can we learn from them as we face the humanitarian crises of our own time? Hosted by the Dorothy Alling Memorial Library. Williston, Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 21 Library Ln, 6:00 pm. Kathy DeLuca, (802) 878-4918.

September 17 — The Vermont Civil War Songbook. Dressed in period costume, singer/researcher Linda Radtke shares songs from Vermont during the Civil War period, with engaging commentary and letters from Vermont soldiers. Seldom-heard songs from the Vermont Historical Society include the comic but poignant "Grafted into the Army," "Yankee Robinson at Bull Run," "Neath the Pines of Vermont" (in which a soldier returns home to die), a satirical song about Jefferson Davis, and sentimental ballads from Vermont during the period. Linda Radtke is joined by pianist Arthur Zorn in this program for all audiences that brings the Civil War period in Vermont to life through music and letters. Hosted by the St. Albans Historical Society and Museum. St. Albans Historical Museum, Bliss Auditorium, 9 Church St, 7:00 pm. Cindy Rutkowski, (802) 524-6897.

September 18 — Alfred Hitchcock and the Art of Suspense. Hitchcock famously said “Some films are slices of life; mine are slices of cake.” His career spanned forty years and many film eras. Film expert Rick Winston will discuss the evolution of Hitchcock’s craft, exploring his favorite themes, his relationship with his collaborators, and his wry sense of humour no matter how grisly the subject matter. By drawing on twelve film clips, starting with his 1925 silent The Lodger and continuing through to his Hollywood classics such as Notorious and Rear Window, Winston will illuminate the arc of Hitchcock’s brilliant career. Hosted by the Bristol Historical Society. Bristol, Howden Hall Community Center, 19 West St, 7:00 pm. Reg Dearborn, (802) 453-3526.

September 19 — Vermont and the Civil War. From Cedar Creek to Gettysburg, Vermonters were central to the Union cause. Vermont author and Civil War historian Howard Coffin addresses the Vermont contribution to the Civil War. Hosted by the St. Albans Historical Society and Museum. St. Albans Historical Museum, 9 Church St, 7:00 pm. Cindy Rutkowski, (802) 524-6897.

September 27 — Colonial Meetinghouses of New England. New England’s colonial meetinghouses embody an important yet little-known chapter in American history. Built mostly with tax money, they served as both places of worship and places for town meetings, and were the centers of life in colonial New England communities. Using photographs of the few surviving “mint condition” meetinghouses as illustrations, this presentation by photographer Paul Wainwright tells the story of the society that built and used them, and the lasting impact they have had on American culture. Hosted by the Grafton Historical Society. Grafton White Church, 9 Main St, 4:00 pm. Patricia Jeziorski, (802) 843-2584.

October

October 1 — Alfred Hitchcock and the Art of Suspense. Hitchcock famously said “Some films are slices of life; mine are slices of cake.” His career spanned forty years and many film eras. Film expert Rick Winston will discuss the evolution of Hitchcock’s craft, exploring his favorite themes, his relationship with his collaborators, and his wry sense of humour no matter how grisly the subject matter. By drawing on twelve film clips, starting with his 1925 silent The Lodger and continuing through to his Hollywood classics such as Notorious and Rear Window, Winston will illuminate the arc of Hitchcock’s brilliant career. Hosted by the Milton Historical Society and Museum. Milton Historical Society and Museum, 13 School Street, 7:00 pm. Allison Belisle, (802) 363-2598.

October 7 — 400 Miles Down the Connecticut River. New England's longest river, the Connecticut, is rich in history. Michael Tougias, author of fourteen books about New England, offers a narrated slide presentation that takes the viewer down the entire 410 miles of the river, discussing history from the days of loggers, Indian Wars, steamships, and canals. Hosted by the Jeudevine Memorial Library. Hardwick, Memorial Building, 20 Church St, 7:00 pm. Lisa Sammet, (802) 472-5948.

October 12 — The Battle of Lake Champlain. On September 11, 1814—187 years before the attack on the World Trade Center—British Army and Royal Naval forces attacked a regular American army and navy at Cumberland Bay in Plattsburgh. Although backed by Vermont Militia, the Americans were outnumbered nearly four to one. If the invaders had won, they could have taken Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. This largest and most decisive battle of the War of 1812 determined the future of our nation; it is a story of great courage and human tragedy told by Colonel David Fitz-Enz. Hosted by the Woodstock Historical Society. Woodstock History Center, 26 Elm St, 2:00 pm. Jennie Shurtleff, (802) 457-1822.

October 15 — Inventive Vermonters: A Sampling of Farm Tools and Implements. Vermonters have always been inventive, especially when it comes to agricultural innovations. Time- and labor-saving inventions that ease the hard work of farming have always been important in our rural, agricultural state. In this illustrated lecture, retired engineer Paul Wood presents a sampling of farm tools, implements, and artifacts invented or produced in Vermont, examining their use, uniqueness of design, and the often fascinating stories of the inventors themselves. Hosted by the Pawlett Historical Society. Pawlet Public Library, 141 School St, 2:00 pm. Steve Williams, (802) 645-9529.

October 16 — Alfred Hitchcock and the Art of Suspense. Hitchcock famously said “Some films are slices of life; mine are slices of cake.” His career spanned forty years and many film eras. Film expert Rick Winston will discuss the evolution of Hitchcock’s craft, exploring his favorite themes, his relationship with his collaborators, and his wry sense of humour no matter how grisly the subject matter. By drawing on twelve film clips, starting with his 1925 silent The Lodger and continuing through to his Hollywood classics such as Notorious and Rear Window, Winston will illuminate the arc of Hitchcock’s brilliant career. Hosted by the Bristol Historical Society. Bristol, American Legion Post 19, 56 Airport Dr, 7:30 pm. Sylvia Coffin, (802) 453-3439.

November

November 5 — Vermont History through Song. Singer and researcher Linda Radtke, joined by pianist Arthur Zorn, brings Vermont history to life with engaging commentary about the songs found in the Vermont Historical Society's collection of sheet music. Dressed in period costume, Ms. Radtke takes listeners through state history, using the songs Vermonters published in their communities. Hosted by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Lamoille Valley. Stowe, Town and Country Resort at Stowe, 876 Mountain Rd, 1:30 pm. Millie Marron, (802) 253-9011.

November 13 — Inventive Vermonters: A Sampling of Farm Tools and Implements. Vermonters have always been inventive, especially when it comes to agricultural innovations. Time- and laborsaving inventions that ease the hard work of farming have always been important in our rural, agricultural state. In this illustrated lecture, retired engineer Paul Wood presents a sampling of farm tools, implements, and artifacts invented or produced in Vermont, examining their use, uniqueness of design, and the often fascinating stories of the inventors themselves. Hosted by the Starksboro Historical Society. Starksboro, Starksboro Public Library, 2827 Route 116, 7:00 pm. Robert Stokes, (802) 453-3068.

November 14–15 — VHC 2014 Fall Conference: A Fire Never Extinguished: How America’s Civil War Continues to Shape Civic and Cultural Life in America. Many of the issues associated with the Civil War resonate today—in Vermont and throughout the nation. VHC’s fall conference (five months before the end of the sesquicentennial of the Civil War) will examine the influence that the War has had and continues to have, and will seek to identify lessons vital to American democracy that still can be learned from the War and its aftermath as we continue to build “a more perfect union” in the twenty-first century. Presented in collaboration with the Vermont Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission. More details. Burlington, University of Vermont, Dudley H. Davis Center. Max Matthews, (802) 262-2626 x304.

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Last Updated 6/7/2011 11:15:20 AM

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