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Vermont Humanities Events Statewide

Last Updated 12/18/2014 10:57:06 AM

Vermont Humanities Events Statewide     

 

Through Spring 2015 — Cycles of Change: Farming in Norwich. Grant Event. An exhibit documenting agricultural heritage through the stories of eight working farms. On display through spring 2015. Visit norwichhistory.org for more information. Hosted by the Norwich Historical Society and supported by a VHC grant. Norwich Historical Society, 277 Main St. Norwich Historical Society, (802) 649-0124 or info@norwichhistory.org.

January 2015

January 3 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Four: "Doers and Shapers." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores progressivism in education and state law from Act 250 to civil unions. Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Varnum Memorial Library. Jeffersonville, Varnum Memorial Library, 194 Main St, 3:00 pm. Laurie Baron, (802) 644-5669.

January 4 — The Secret Garden.  Grant Event. This is the East Coast Premiere of a new opera (by composer Nolan Gasser with a libretto by Carey Harrison) based on the beloved children’s novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett, coming direct from its debut at the San Francisco Opera. Lora Rachel Davidson portrays the lead role of Mary Lennox, with a professional orchestra and cast, including soloists from the Metropolitan Opera, The Houston Opera, and Washington National Opera. Hosted by the Opera Theatre of Weston. Rutland, Paramount Theatre, 30 Center St, 2:00 pm. Anne Dolivo, (802) 768-8144.

January 6 — Book Discussion: Under the Sea Wind by Rachel Carson. Part of the Earth Tones series. These authors strike a variety of provocative and poignant environmental notes— haunting, satirical, delicate, mysterious, hopeful, wise—as they look with fresh eyes at the ageold question of how to live in harmony with nature. Led by Eric A Bye. Hosted by the Dorset Village Library. Dorset Village Library, 13 Church St, 10:00 am. Diana Green, (802) 867-9990.

January 7 — The History of Herbal Medicine in America. Expert herbalist Rosemary Gladstar examines the early history of herbalism in America and how herbs play a role in healthcare today.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Ilsley Public Library. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main St, 7:00 pm. Chris Kirby, (802) 388-4095.

January 7 — Building Monticello. Thomas Jefferson never knew the Monticello we visit today — in perfect condition, impeccably furnished. Jefferson died so deeply in debt that the house and contents had to be auctioned off. Dartmouth College senior lecturer Marlene Heck explains the lifelong project Jefferson called his “essay in architecture.”A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Manchester Community Library. Manchester, First Congregational Church, 7:00 pm. Cindy Waters, (802) 362-2607.

January 7 — The White Mountain Huts. Dartmouth professor Allen Koop explains the Appalachian Mountain Club’s hut system in New Hampshire, and how the huts and their people have formed a society with its own history, traditions, and legends.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 1171 Main St, 7:00 pm. Robert Joly, (802) 748-8291.

January 7 — The Examined Life. Socrates famously proclaimed, “The unexamined life is not worth living.” Philosophy scholar Susanne Claxton explores what constitutes the examined life and how we may best pursue it.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Goodrich Memorial Library. Newport, Goodrich Memorial Library, 202 Main St, 7:00 pm. Carol Nicholson, (802) 334-7902.

January 7 — Rowing Against Wind and Tide: The Journals and Letters of Anne Morrow Lindbergh. Author Reeve Lindbergh discusses collecting four decades of her mother’s previously unpublished diaries and letters— shedding light on her mother’s marriage to Charles Lindbergh and her take on world events.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Rutland Free Library. Rutland Free Library, 10 Court St, 7:00 pm. Abby Noland, (802) 773-1860.

January 7 — On Thin Ice: Climate Change in the Cryosphere. Pam Pearson, director of the International Cryosphere Climate Initiative, considers changes in the globe’s regions of ice and snow—and whether we can and will act in time to halt these changes.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Montpelier, Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main St, 7:00 pm. Rachel Senechal, (802) 223-3338.

January 7 — Delicious to the Ear: The Inspiring Voice of Maya Angelou. Before she became an internationally revered poet, memoirist, and activist, Maya Angelou was mute for five years as a child. UVM professor Emily Bernard explains how poetry awakened Angelou’s voice, a voice that transformed a history of trauma into inspiration and beauty.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St, 7:00 pm. Jerry Carbone, (802) 254-5290.

January 7 — Georgia O'Keeffe: A Critical Look. Georgia O'Keeffe lived 99 years and produced more than 2,000 works in her 75- year career. James Maroney, the former head of American Paintings at both Sotheby's and Christie's in New York who appraised her estate after her death, presents a critical evaluation of her best work.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

January 7 — Anne Frank’s Neighbors: What Did They Do? Although Anne Frank’s Diary is the most widely read nonfiction book in the world after the Bible, little attention has been paid to her neighbors—the people who lived alongside the Jewish population as persecution intensified. Mary Fillmore examines the choices they faced and the decisions they made in the face of those choices. Why did some people ignore the situation, while others felt compelled to resist? What can we learn from them as we face the humanitarian crises of our own time? Hosted by the Thompson Center. Woodstock, Thompson Center, 99 Senior Lane, 1:00 pm. Pam Butler, (802) 457-3277

January 8 — Book Discussion: Moll Flanders by Daniel Defoe. Part of the The Rise of the English Novel series. How did the modern novel arise? What were the first true novels like? This series was created by VHC Scholar Eric Bye in conjunction with the Dorset Free Library. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Morristown Centennial Library. Morrisville, Morristown Centennial Library, 7 Richmond St, 7:00 pm. Frances Ruggles, (802) 888-2616.

January 9 — Vermont and the Civil War. From Cedar Creek to Gettysburg, Vermonters were central to the Union cause. Vermont author and Civil War historian Howard Coffin addresses the Vermont contribution to the Civil War. Hosted by the Tunbridge Public Library. Tunbridge Public Library, 289 Vermont Route 110, 7:00 pm. Contact the library, (802) 889-9404.

January 10 — Book Discussion: The Seven Deadly Sins Sampler. Part of the Seven Deadly Sins series. Delve into the short stories from the Great Books Foundation’s Seven Deadly Sins Sampler and join us as we explore such issues as what makes these sins so deadly, who decided which sins qualify, and whether avoidance of sin is rising or falling in today’s society. Bring a friend to learn and laugh with us! In this session, we will discuss the stories on Sloth and Greed. Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Cambridge Arts Council. Jeffersonville, Varnum Memorial Library, 194 Main St, 3:00 pm. April Tuck, (802) 644-6632.

January 10 — The Secret Garden. Grant Event. This is the East Coast Premiere of a new opera (by composer Nolan Gasser with a libretto by Carey Harrison) based on the beloved children’s novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett, coming direct from its debut at the San Francisco Opera. Lora Rachel Davidson portrays the lead role of Mary Lennox, with a professional orchestra and cast, including soloists from the Metropolitan Opera, The Houston Opera, and Washington National Opera. Hosted by the Opera Theatre of Weston. Weston Playhouse, 12 Park St, 2:00 pm. Anne Dolivo, (802) 768-8144.

January 11 — The Secret Garden. Grant Event. This is the East Coast Premiere of a new opera (by composer Nolan Gasser with a libretto by Carey Harrison) based on the beloved children’s novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett, coming direct from its debut at the San Francisco Opera. Lora Rachel Davidson portrays the lead role of Mary Lennox, with a professional orchestra and cast, including soloists from the Metropolitan Opera, The Houston Opera, and Washington National Opera. Hosted by the Opera Theatre of Weston. Weston Playhouse, 1212 Park St, 2:00 pm. Anne Dolivo, (802) 768-8144.

January 11 — Book Discussion: Dear Mr. Henshaw by Beverly Cleary. Part of the American Stories Across the Generations series. This series focuses on the theme of relationships between children and older adults. Led by Francette B Cerulli. Hosted by the Jones Memorial Library. Orleans, Jones Memorial Library, 1 Water St, 2:00 pm. Joanne Pariseau, (802) 754-6660.

January 11 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part One: "A Very New Idea." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores the Native and Colonial roots from which Vermont grew. Led by Dorothy Tod. Hosted by the Montgomery Town Library. Montgomery Center, Montgomery Public Safety Building, 86 Mountain Rd, 2:00 pm. June Abramowitz, (802) 326-4239.

January 12 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Four: "Doers and Shapers." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores progressivism in education and state law from Act 250 to civil unions. Led by Tom Fels. Hosted by the Mount Tabor/Danby Historical Society. Danby, Mount Tabor/Danby Historical Society, 74 S Main St, 7:00 pm. Lauren Dever, (802) 293-2265.

January 12 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part One: "A Very New Idea." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores the Native and Colonial roots from which Vermont grew. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Latham Memorial Library. Thetford, Latham Memorial Library, 16 Library Ln, 7:00 pm. Peter Blodgett, (802) 785-4361.

January 14 — Book Discussion: The Horse's Mouth by Joyce Cary. Grant Event. Led by Jim Schley. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073 or lynne@kimballlibrary.org.

January 14 — What’s the Use of Stories That Aren’t Even True? Salman Rushdie, author of VHC's 2015 Vermont Reads Book, Haroun and the Sea of Stories, talks about the importance of storytelling. A First Wednesdays lecture. Presented with the Office of the President, University of Vermont.Hosted by the Brownell Library. Burlington, Ira Allen Chapel, 26 University Ter, 5:00 pm. Max Matthews, (802) 262-1355.

January 14 — Live Streams of What’s the Use of Stories That Aren’t Even True? A Vermont Reads Event and First Wednesdays lecture. Public viewing of the live video feed from Burlington of Salman Rushdie, author of VHC's 2015 Vermont Reads Book, Haroun and the Sea of Stories, discussing the importance of storytelling. 5:00 pm.

  • Richford Jr.-Sr. High School, 1 Corliss Hts. Annette Goyne, (802) 848-7416 x263.
  • Bradford Public Library, 21 S Main St. Debra Tinkham, (802) 222-4536.
  • Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St. Contact the library, (802) 254-5290.
  • Quechee Library, 1957 Main St. Marieke Sperry, (802) 295 -6341.
  • Ludlow, Black River Middle-High School Library, 43 Main St. Contact The Book Nook, (802) 228-3238.

January 15 — Lifelong Learning Music Series: Francesco Maria Veracini. Grant Event. Veracini came from a family of violinists in Florence. His 18th-century career took him to Dresden and London as violinist, conductor and composer. His playing was virtuosic, but his arrogant personality and eccentric behavior often got him into trouble. Part of the Lifelong Learning Music Series, a great opportunity to increase your musical knowledge in a relaxed and fun environment. Led by Lois Price, a flutist who teaches music appreciation at Champlain College. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 7:00 pm. Jennifer Murray, (802) 652-7076.

January 17 — Song of the Vikings. Like Greek mythology, Norse myths are still with us, inspiring storytellers from Tolkien to Neil Gaiman, Michael Chabon, and A.S. Byatt. Surprisingly, most of what we know about Valhalla and the Valkyries, Odin and the Well of Wisdom, the Mighty Thor, and Ragnarok or the Twilight of the Gods was written by a 13th-century Icelandic chieftain, Snorri Sturluson. Award-winning author Nancy Marie Brown brings the fascinating story of Sturluson’s life into focus, drawing on newly available sources and illuminating the folklore and pagan legends of medieval Scandinavia. Hosted by the Springfield Town Library. Springfield, Town Library, Flinn Reading Room, 43 Main St, 2:00 pm. Library, (802) 885-3108.

January 18 — Film Screening and Discussion: The Horse's Mouth. Grant Event. Joyce Cary's novel is the source of this droll, iconic 1958 comedy starring Alec Guinness in the greatest role of his career: the eccentric London painter and visionary Gulley Jimson, surrounded by an array of colorful characters. Guinness also wrote the screenplay and Ronald Neame directed. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Tickets $9; discounts for Chandler Film Society members and students. Anyone who cannot afford the price of admission can request a discount at the box office. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 N Main St, 6:00 pm. Emily Crosby, (802) 431-0204 or emily@chandler-arts.org.

January 20 — Book Discussion: Hunting for Hope: A Father's Journey by Scott Russell Sanders. Part of the Earth Tones series. These authors strike a variety of provocative and poignant environmental notes—haunting, satirical, delicate, mysterious, hopeful, wise—as they look with fresh eyes at the age-old question of how to live in harmony with nature. Led by Eric A Bye. Hosted by the Dorset Village Library. Dorset Village Library, 13 Church St, 10:00 am. Diana Green, (802) 867-9990.

January 21 — The Western Abenaki Today. Where are the Abenaki today and what are they doing? Jeanne discusses the Abenaki of the twenty-first century and the many different programs and projects in which they are involved to maintain and preserve their culture, traditions, and language in today's fast changing world. How do computers, the internet, cell phones, and DVDs affect Abenaki culture, traditions, and language? Hosted by the New Haven Community Library. New Haven, Town Offices, 78 North St Ste 2, 7:30 pm. Norma Norland, (802) 545-2637.

January 22 — Book Discussion: Marrying Mozart by Stephanie Cowell. Part of the Orchestrated Stories: Novels about Composers series. Following on the heels of our popular “Portraits of the Artists: Novels about Painters” series, “Orchestrated Stories” offers fictional interpretations of four eminent composers: Mozart, Schumann, Vivaldi, and Joplin. What does it mean to translate these historical figures and their canonical compositions to novel form? Can fiction be as useful a tool for interpreting real people as biography? Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Warren Public Library. Warren Public Library, 413 Main St, 9:00 am. Anne Dillon, (802) 496-3656.

January 23 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part One: "A Very New Idea." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores the Native and Colonial roots from which Vermont grew. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Tenney Memorial Library. Newbury, Tenney Memorial Library, 4886 Main St South, 6:30 pm. Luisa Lindsley, (802) 866-5366.

January 24 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Five: "Ceres' Children." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores participatory democracy and ethics in conservation and farming. Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Varnum Memorial Library. Jeffersonville, Varnum Memorial Library, 194 Main St, 3:00 pm. Laurie Baron, (802) 644-5669.

January 25 — How the Guitar Conquered America. When the first guitar reached these shores 425 years ago, it was a small, unimpressive folk instrument. Now, more guitars are sold in America than all other musical instruments combined. How did this unlikely conquest take place? Tim Brookes attempts to answer that question with demonstrations, displays, and slides. He touches on the rise of technologies and speaks to the guitar’s importance in defining national, ethnic, and regional identity. He also connects the guitar to such utterly unexpected incidents as the importance of the Confederate Steam Ship Shenandoah, Bonnie and Clyde’s life of crime, and the sad demise of Strenuous Lifer, the pig in the Coney Island Zoo. Hosted by the Jewish Community of Greater Stowe. Stowe, the Jewish Community of Greater Stowe, 1189 Cape Cod Road, 3:00 pm. Carole Lichtenstein, (802) 253-7408.

January 25 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Two: "Under the Surface." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores labor wars, eugenics, the McCarthy era, and progressive Republicanism. Led by Jill Mudgett. Hosted by the Montgomery Town Library. Montgomery Center, Montgomery Public Safety Building, 86 Mountain Rd, 2:00 pm. June Abramowitz, (802) 326 -4239.

January 26 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Two: "Under the Surface." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores labor wars, eugenics, the McCarthy era, and progressive Republicanism. Led by Alan Berolzheimer. Hosted by the Latham Memorial Library. Thetford, Latham Memorial Library, 16 Library Ln, 7:00 pm. Peter Blodgett, (802) 785-4361.

January 26 — Book Discussion: A Passage to India by E. M. Forster, Shooting an Elephant by George Orwell. Part of the Never Setting Sun: The Heyday of the British Colonial Empire series. At one point, the United Kingdom's reach extended all the way around the globe. Discover the complexities of colonialism in these works set in India and Africa. Led by Jon Margolis. Hosted by the Barton Public Library. Barton Public Library, 100 Church St, 6:30 pm. Contact the library, (802) 525-6524.

January 26 — Book Discussion: Eisenhower by Stephen Ambrose. Part of the 20th Century Presidents: Post-WWII series. Which 20th-century U.S. Presidents most dramatically impacted the direction of the country—for good or ill—and its standing in the world? Arguably, every president has had a dramatic impact on the country, but some have loomed larger than others— and larger than life. This series examines four 20th-century presidents who left a strong imprint on America prior to and during World War Two. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 7:30 pm. Advance Signup Required, Natalie Albers, (802) 985-0659.

January 29 — Book Discussion: Pamela by Samuel Richardson. Part of the The Rise of the English Novel series. How did the modern novel arise? What were the first true novels like? This series was created by VHC Scholar Eric Bye in conjunction with the Dorset Free Library. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Morristown Centennial Library. Morrisville, Morristown Centennial Library, 7 Richmond St, 7:00 pm. Frances Ruggles, (802) 888-2616.

February 2015

February 1 — Book Discussion: A Long Way from Chicago: A Novel in Stories by Richard Peck. Part of the American Stories Across the Generations series. This series focuses on the theme of relationships between children and older adults. Led by Francette B Cerulli. Hosted by the Jones Memorial Library. Orleans, Jones Memorial Library, 1 Water St, 2:00 pm. Joanne Pariseau, (802) 754-6660.

February 1 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part One: "A Very New Idea." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores the Native and Colonial roots from which Vermont grew. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Martha Canfield Memorial Free Library. Arlington, Martha Canfield Library, 528 E Arlington Rd, 2:00 pm. Phyllis Skidmore, (802) 375-6153.

February 3 — Book Discussion: A Friend of the Earth by T.C. Boyle. Part of the Earth Tones series. These authors strike a variety of provocative and poignant environmental notes— haunting, satirical, delicate, mysterious, hopeful, wise—as they look with fresh eyes at the ageold question of how to live in harmony with nature. Led by Eric A Bye. Hosted by the Dorset Village Library. Dorset Village Library, 13 Church St, 10:00 am. Diana Green, (802) 867-9990.

February 4 — Book Discussion: Out of Africa by Isak Dinesen. Part of the From Page to Screen series. When is it true that the movie's good, but the book is better? What makes it so? What does a book or the script of a play have to offer that its film version does not? Conversely, what does film offer that print cannot? Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7076.

February 4 — The Hungry Heart. Filmmaker Bess O’Brien discusses and shows excerpts from her film The Hungry Heart, which provides an intimate look at the often hidden world of prescription drug addiction in Vermont.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Ilsley Public Library. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main St, 7:00 pm. Chris Kirby, (802) 388-4095.

February 4 — Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. Douglass and Lincoln — one born a slave, the other born dirt poor — became respectively one of the nation’s greatest orators and one of its greatest presidents. Harvard professor John Stauffer examines their friendship, the similarities in their lives, and their legacies.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Manchester Community Library. Manchester, First Congregational Church, 7:00 pm. Cindy Waters, (802) 362-2607.

February 4 — The Shia-Sunni Divide in Islam. Former Iranian Ambassador to the UN Mansour Farhang examines the origin and contemporary revival of this 1300-year-long divide and explores how contemporary challenges facing states and societies in the Middle East exacerbate the animosity.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 1171 Main St, 7:00 pm. Robert Joly, (802) 748-8291.

February 4 — Delicious to the Ear: The Inspiring Voice of Maya Angelou. Before she was a revered poet, memoirist, and activist, Maya Angelou was mute for five years as a child. UVM professor Emily Bernard explains how poetry awakened Angelou’s voice, which transformed a history of trauma into inspiration and beauty.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Essex Junction, Brownell Library, 6 Lincoln St, 7:00 pm. Wendy Hysko, (802) 878-6954.

February 4 — An Evening with E.B. White. From his exquisite essays in The New Yorker to the beloved children’s classic Charlotte's Web, E.B. White remains the master's master of elegant prose, sophisticated wit, and graceful irreverence. Drawing from his stories, essays, poems, and letters, Dartmouth professor Nancy Jay Crumbine celebrates White's versatility and enormous legacy.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Goodrich Memorial Library. Newport, Goodrich Memorial Library, 202 Main St, 7:00 pm. Carol Nicholson, (802) 334-7902.

February 4 — Knight to Queen. Chess, Courtly Life, and the Game of Love in the Middle Ages. Imported from the Arabs and Persians in the ninth century, chess became a status symbol, an allegory of battle, and a metaphor for love. Dartmouth professor Jane Carroll examines the game of kings.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Rutland Free Library. Rutland Free Library, 10 Court St, 7:00 pm. Abby Noland, (802) 773-1860.

February 4 — Plato's Republic: Rethinking His Utopian Ideal. Philosophy scholar Susanne Claxton explores the key elements of the utopian republic envisioned by Plato and considers their adequacy.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St, 7:00 pm. Jerry Carbone, (802) 254-5290.

February 4 — Victoria’s Secrets. Middlebury College professor Antonia Losano explains how the Victorian era, the age of staid decorum, also had its guilty pleasures: mysteries, ghost stories, science fiction, imperialist adventure tales, and radical fantasies of gender confusion.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

February 4 — Oral History as Discovery Research. Oral history is a research method that can be used to explore the fabric of everyday experience, past or present. Want to know what life on a farm was like in the 1940s? An older farmer can tell you. He or she can also describe the complex changes that led us from then to now. Gregory Sharrow of the Vermont Folklife Center explores the richness and the significance of oral history as a documentary research method, illustrated with excerpts from his field recordings, featuring remarkable people and memorable stories. Hosted by the Brookfield Free Public Library. Brookfield, Pond Village Church, 49 Ridge Rd, 7:00 pm. Laura Rochat, (802) 276-3358.

February 7 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Six: "People's Power." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores contemporary tensions over energy, independence, climate, and the state's future. Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Varnum Memorial Library. Jeffersonville, Varnum Memorial Library, 194 Main St, 3:00 pm. Laurie Baron, (802) 644-5669.

February 8 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Three: "Refuge, Reinvention, and Revolution." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores innovation, interstates, and counter-culture. Led by Jill Mudgett. Hosted by the Montgomery Town Library. Montgomery Center, Montgomery Public Safety Building, 86 Mountain Rd, 2:00 pm. June Abramowitz, (802) 326 -4239.

February 9 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Five: "Ceres' Children." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores participatory democracy and ethics in conservation and farming. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Mount Tabor/Danby Historical Society. Danby, Mount Tabor/Danby Historical Society, 74 S Main St, 7:00 pm. Lauren Dever, (802) 293-2265.

February 9 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Three: "Refuge, Reinvention, and Revolution." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores innovation, interstates, and counter-culture. Led by Jim Schley. Hosted by the Latham Memorial Library. Thetford, Latham Memorial Library, 16 Library Ln, 7:00 pm. Peter Blodgett, (802) 785-4361.

February 10 — Book Discussion: Five Great Short Stories by Anton Chekhov. Part of the Masters of the Short Story series. Short stories, as a modern genre, emerged in the early 19th Century, and mushroomed with the development of journals and magazines. This series reflects both the short story’s 19th Century roots and its later development as a 20th Century art form. Led by Jim Schley. Hosted by the Morrill Memorial and Harris Library. Strafford, Morrill Memorial and Harris Library, 220 Justin Morrill Mem Hwy, 7:00 pm. Rebecca Seibel, (802) 765-4037.

February 11 — An Evening with Sojourner Truth. In this living history portrayal, Kathryn Woods uses spiritual music and Truth’s own words to recreate the remarkable life of the famous abolitionist, feminist, and escaped slave.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Montpelier, Vermont State House, 115 State Street, 7:30 pm. Rachel Senechal, (802) 223-3338.

February 11 — Book Discussion: Paper Fish by Tina de Rosa. Part of the Gastronomy: Novels about Food and Culture series. One of the most tantalizing ways to learn about a culture is through its food. These mouth-watering novels highlight how what we eat is closely aligned with who we are. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Walden Community Library. West Danville, Walden Community Library, 135 Cahoon Farm Rd, 7:00 pm. Anne Smith, (802) 563-2630.

February 11 — Book Discussion: The Turn of the Screw by Henry James. Grant Event. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073 or lynne@kimballlibrary.org.

February 12 — Book Discussion: Clara: A Novel by Janice Galloway. Part of the Orchestrated Stories: Novels about Composers series. Following on the heels of our popular “Portraits of the Artists: Novels about Painters” series, “Orchestrated Stories” offers fictional interpretations of four eminent composers: Mozart, Schumann, Vivaldi, and Joplin. What does it mean to translate these historical figures and their canonical compositions to novel form? Can fiction be as useful a tool for interpreting real people as biography? Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Warren Public Library. Waitsfield, Joslin Memorial Library, 4391 Main St, 9:00 am. Anne Dillon, (802) 496-3656.

February 14 —Book Discussion: The Seven Deadly Sins Sampler. Part of the Seven Deadly Sins series. Delve into the short stories from the Great Books Foundation’s Seven Deadly Sins Sampler and join us as we explore such issues as what makes these sins so deadly, who decided which sins qualify, and whether avoidance of sin is rising or falling in today’s society. Bring a friend to learn and laugh with us! In this Valentine’s Day session, we will discuss what else, but Gluttony and Lust? Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Cambridge Arts Council. Jeffersonville, Varnum Memorial Library, 194 Main St, 3:00 pm. April Tuck, (802) 644-6632.

February 15 — Film Screening and Discussion: The Innocents. Grant Event. Deborah Kerr plays a young governess for two children who becomes convinced that their house is haunted. This 1961 gothic horror film, revered as one of the cinema’s great ghost stories, is based on the Henry James novella, The Turn of the Screw. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Tickets $9; discounts for Chandler Film Society members and students. Anyone who cannot afford the price of admission can request a discount at the box office. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 N Main St, 6:00 pm. Emily Crosby, (802) 431-0204 or emily@chandler-arts.org.

February 15 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Two: "Under the Surface." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores labor wars, eugenics, the McCarthy era, and progressive Republicanism. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Martha Canfield Memorial Free Library. Arlington, Martha Canfield Library, 528 E Arlington Rd, 2:00 pm. Phyllis Skidmore, (802) 375-6153.

February 17 — Book Discussion: Mean Spirit by Linda Hogan. Part of the Earth Tones series. These authors strike a variety of provocative and poignant environmental notes—haunting, satirical, delicate, mysterious, hopeful, wise—as they look with fresh eyes at the age-old question of how to live in harmony with nature. Led by Eric A Bye. Hosted by the Dorset Village Library. Dorset Village Library, 13 Church St, 10:00 am. Diana Green, (802) 867-9990.

February 18 — Disappearing Alphabets and the Future of the Written Word. What does the age of Digital Convergence, Twitter, and eBooks mean for the future of the written word? Writer/carver/painter Tim Brookes offers remarkable and thought-provoking perspective on this question by looking at thirteen forms of writing from all over the world that are in danger of extinction. He displays a sample of each script, leading a discussion on how technology will help —and always has helped—define the nature of communication, and shows how the story of a culture can be seen in its writing—even if that writing is (as in these examples) beautiful, bizarre, utterly unfamiliar, and disappearing. Hosted by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Central Vermont. Montpelier Senior Activity Center, 58 Barre St, 1:30 pm. Marge Christie, (802) 454-7814.

February 19 — Lifelong Learning Music Series: Giuseppe Verdi. Grant Event. Verdi came from a small Italian village to become his country’s most revered composer as well as a national hero. His long life spanning most of the 19th century resulted in 28 operas of which many, such as Tosca, Rigoletto, Otello and Aida, are staples of opera houses worldwide. Part of the Lifelong Learning Music Series, a great opportunity to increase your musical knowledge in a relaxed and fun environment. Led by Lois Price, a flutist who teaches music appreciation at Champlain College. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 7:00 pm. Jennifer Murray, (802) 652-7076.

February 19 — Book Discussion: Joseph Andrews by Henry Fielding. Part of the The Rise of the English Novel series. How did the modern novel arise? What were the first true novels like? This series was created by VHC Scholar Eric Bye in conjunction with the Dorset Free Library. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Morristown Centennial Library. Morrisville, Morristown Centennial Library, 7 Richmond St, 7:00 pm. Frances Ruggles, (802) 888-2616.

February 22 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Four: "Doers and Shapers." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores progressivism in education and state law from Act 250 to civil unions. Led by Jill Mudgett. Hosted by the Montgomery Town Library. Montgomery Center, Montgomery Public Safety Building, 86 Mountain Rd, 2:00 pm. June Abramowitz, (802) 326 -4239.

February 23 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Four: "Doers and Shapers." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores progressivism in education and state law from Act 250 to civil unions. Led by Jim Schley. Hosted by the Latham Memorial Library. Thetford, Latham Memorial Library, 16 Library Ln, 7:00 pm. Peter Blodgett, (802) 785-4361.

February 23 — Book Discussion: Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe. Part of the Never Setting Sun: The Heyday of the British Colonial Empire series. At one point, the United Kingdom's reach extended all the way around the globe. Discover the complexities of colonialism in these works set in India and Africa. Led by Jon Margolis. Hosted by the Barton Public Library. Barton Public Library, 100 Church St, 6:30 pm. Contact the library, (802) 525-6524.

February 26 — Book Discussion: Mating by Norman Rush. Part of the Romantic Ideal series. The characters in these works seek out their ideal of love, happiness, and fulfillment with consequences that are by turns bittersweet, tragic, noble, unconventional, and even comic. But can an ideal ever be met? Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Blake Memorial Library. East Corinth, Blake Memorial Library, 676 Village Road, 4:30 pm. Ken Linge, (802) 439-5338.

March 2015

March 1 — The Old Country Fiddler: Charles Ross Taggart, Vermont’s Traveling Entertainer. Having grown up in Topsham, Vermont, Charles Ross Taggart went on to a forty-year career performing in countless stage shows across the country, including the famous Red Path Chautauqua circuit. A fiddler, piano player, humorist, singer, and ventriloquist, he made at least 25 recordings with the Victor, Edison, and Columbia companies, and appeared in a talking movie picture four years before Al Jolson starred in The Jazz Singer. Fiddler Adam Boyce portrays Mr. Taggart near the end of his career, circa 1936, sharing recollections of his life and career interspersed with live fiddling and humorous sketches. Hosted by the Jewish Community of Greater Stowe. Stowe, the Jewish Community of Greater Stowe, 1189 Cape Cod Road, 3:00 pm. Carole Lichtenstein, (802) 253-7408.

March 1 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Three: "Refuge, Reinvention, and Revolution." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores innovation, interstates, and counter-culture. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Martha Canfield Memorial Free Library. Arlington, Martha Canfield Library, 528 E Arlington Rd, 2:00 pm. Phyllis Skidmore, (802) 375-6153.

March 2 — Book Discussion: An Unfinished Life: John F. Kennedy, 1917-1963 by Robert Dallek. Part of the 20th Century Presidents: Post-WWII series. Which 20th-century U.S. Presidents most dramatically impacted the direction of the country—for good or ill—and its standing in the world? Arguably, every president has had a dramatic impact on the country, but some have loomed larger than others—and larger than life. This series examines four 20thcentury presidents who left a strong imprint on America prior to and during World War Two. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 7:30 pm. Advance Signup Required, Natalie Albers, (802) 985-0659.

March 3 — Book Discussion: The Great Work: Our Way into the Future by Thomas Berry. Part of the Earth Tones series. These authors strike a variety of provocative and poignant environmental notes—haunting, satirical, delicate, mysterious, hopeful, wise—as they look with fresh eyes at the age-old question of how to live in harmony with nature. Led by Eric A Bye. Hosted by the Dorset Village Library. Dorset Village Library, 13 Church St, 10:00 am. Diana Green, (802) 867-9990.

March 4 — Book Discussion: Shoeless Joe by W. P. Kinsella. Part of the From Page to Screen series. When is it true that the movie's good, but the book is better? What makes it so? What does a book or the script of a play have to offer that its film version does not? Conversely, what does film offer that print cannot? Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7076.

March 4 — You Are Not Special . . . and Other Encouragements. Expanding on his popular commencement speech, viewed by millions on YouTube, high school English teacher and father of four David McCullough Jr. considers how we raise our kids today, and why passionate engagement—rather than success for its own sake—is critical to a fulfilling, happy life.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Ilsley Public Library. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main St, 7:00 pm. Chris Kirby, (802) 388-4095.

March 4 — The Memoir Boom: Who, What, Why. Dartmouth professor and experimental memoirist Irene Kacandes discusses current approaches to life writing and considers why we continue to love reading about others’ lives.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Manchester Community Library. Manchester, First Congregational Church, 7:00 pm. Cindy Waters, (802) 362-2607.

March 4 — Merton, Meditation, and More: The Appeal of Buddhism in the West. The Buddhist tradition is now well-established in the United States, among Buddhists and others, such as Catholic monk and author Thomas Merton, who engaged in Buddhism without conversion. Middlebury College religion professor Elizabeth Morrison considers the reasons for this great interest, and what has emerged from the West’s encounter with Buddhism.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 1171 Main St, 7:00 pm. Robert Joly, (802) 748-8291.

March 4 — Making Sport for Our Neighbors. New Yorker cartoonist Ed Koren takes us on a tour of the roots of visual satire leading to the New Yorker cartoon, with an excursion into the archive of his own work.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Essex Junction, Brownell Library, 6 Lincoln St, 7:00 pm. Wendy Hysko, (802) 878-6954.

March 4 — Trains Come to Orleans County. The arrival of trains in Orleans County in the mid-nineteenth century brought great change to the region. Scott Wheeler, publisher of Vermont’s Northland Journal, discusses how rail—and then, in the early twentieth century, automobiles—affected life in the region, particularly in communities such as Newport.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Goodrich Memorial Library. Newport, Goodrich Memorial Library, 202 Main St, 7:00 pm. Carol Nicholson, (802) 334-7902.

March 4 — “India Rising.” With its sweeping victory in the 2014 elections, India’s right-wing Hindu Bharatiya Janata Party is promising to revitalize the economy. But critics warn that the BJP has often advanced its policies through authoritarianism and religious violence. UVM history professor Abby McGowan considers the challenges and opportunities facing the new government.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Rutland Free Library. Rutland Free Library, 10 Court St, 7:00 pm. Abby Noland, (802) 773-1860.

March 4 — Dealing with Foreign Terrorism. Former CIA Chief of Counterterrorism Haviland Smith examines the history of foreign terrorism directed against US interests, our policy for dealing with it, and how we might do better.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Montpelier, Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main St, 7:00 pm. Rachel Senechal, (802) 223-3338.

March 4 — Photography as Fine Art: Alfred Stieglitz and Camera Work. Photographer, gallerist, and magazine editor Alfred Stieglitz was a seminal figure in the history of twentieth-century photography. Middlebury College professor Kirsten Hoving examines Stieglitz's work and his advocacy for photography as a fine art, with special attention to his quarterly journal Camera Work. A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St, 7:00 pm. Jerry Carbone, (802) 254-5290.

March 4 — What If Poor Women Ran the World? Labor historian Annelise Orleck tells the story of nine African-American union maids in Las Vegas during the 1970s who challenged welfare cuts and built a long-lasting, vibrant antipoverty program run by poor mothers.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

March 8 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Five: "Ceres' Children." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores participatory democracy and ethics in conservation and farming. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Montgomery Town Library. Montgomery Center, Montgomery Public Safety Building, 86 Mountain Rd, 2:00 pm. June Abramowitz, (802) 326-4239.

March 9 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Six: "People's Power." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores contemporary tensions over energy, independence, climate, and the state's future. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Mount Tabor/Danby Historical Society. Danby, Mount Tabor/Danby Historical Society, 74 S Main St, 7:00 pm. Lauren Dever, (802) 293-2265.

March 9 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Five: "Ceres' Children." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores participatory democracy and ethics in conservation and farming. Led by Alan Berolzheimer. Hosted by the Latham Memorial Library. Thetford, Latham Memorial Library, 16 Library Ln, 7:00 pm. Peter Blodgett, (802) 785-4361.

March 11 — Book Discussion: Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare. Grant Event. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073 or lynne@kimballlibrary.org.

March 11 — Book Discussion: Crescent by Diana Abu-Jaber. Part of the Gastronomy: Novels about Food and Culture series. One of the most tantalizing ways to learn about a culture is through its food. These mouth-watering novels highlight how what we eat is closely aligned with who we are. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Walden Community Library. West Danville, Walden Community Library, 135 Cahoon Farm Rd, 7:00 pm. Anne Smith, (802) 563-2630.

March 12 — Meet Eleanor Roosevelt: Wife, Mother, and First Lady. Actress Elena Dodd brings life to Eleanor Roosevelt in this one-woman drama and historical interpretation of the four decades of her marriage to Franklin D. Roosevelt, including her adventures as a controversial First Lady in the 1930s and 1940s but not forgetting her roles as mother and grandmother to a large, lively family. With a frank, often humorous look at some of her struggles, she recalls her years as a timid young wife and mother; her growing involvement in politics, social issues, and the media as first lady; and her gradual emergence as an independent force in both private and public life. A dialogue with the audience follows the presentation, which was researched and written by Josephine Lane and Elena Dodd. Hosted by the Neighborhood Connections. Londonderry, Neighborhood Connections, 5700 Mountain Marketplace, 6:30 pm. Mary Claire Schwartz, (802) 824-4343.

March 12 — Book Discussion: The Blue Flower by Penelope Fitzgerald. Part of the Romantic Ideal series. The characters in these works seek out their ideal of love, happiness, and fulfillment with consequences that are by turns bittersweet, tragic, noble, unconventional, and even comic. But can an ideal ever be met? Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Blake Memorial Library. East Corinth, Blake Memorial Library, 676 Village Road, 4:30 pm. Ken Linge, (802) 439-5338.

March 12 — Book Discussion: The Expedition of Humphrey Clinker by Tobias Smollett. Part of the The Rise of the English Novel series. How did the modern novel arise? What were the first true novels like? This series was created by VHC Scholar Eric Bye in conjunction with the Dorset Free Library. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Morristown Centennial Library. Morrisville, Morristown Centennial Library, 7 Richmond St, 7:00 pm. Frances Ruggles, (802) 888-2616.

March 14 — Book Discussion: The Seven Deadly Sins Sampler. Part of the Seven Deadly Sins series. Delve into the short stories from the Great Books Foundation’s Seven Deadly Sins Sampler and join us as we explore such issues as what makes these sins so deadly, who decided which sins qualify, and whether avoidance of sin is rising or falling in today’s society. Bring a friend to learn and laugh with us! In this special concluding session, we will discuss how the stories and our discussions have changed our perception and opinions about sin. Readers are invited to find and summarize another short story or book that illuminates one of the sins to share with the group. Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Cambridge Arts Council. Jeffersonville, Varnum Memorial Library, 194 Main St, 3:00 pm. April Tuck, (802) 644-6632.

March 15 — Film Screening and Discussion: Much Ado About Nothing. Grant Event. Shakespeare's witty and fast-paced romantic comedy is brought to life in this exuberant 1993 film version directed by Kenneth Branagh, set in the sunny Italian countryside, and starring Branagh as Benedick, Emma Thompson as Beatrice, and featuring a superb cast. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Tickets $9; discounts for Chandler Film Society members and students. Anyone who cannot afford the price of admission can request a discount at the box office. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 N Main St, 6:00 pm. Emily Crosby, (802) 431-0204 or emily@chandler-arts.org.

March 15 — Book Discussion: Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech. Part of the American Stories Across the Generations series. This series focuses on the theme of relationships between children and older adults. Led by Francette B Cerulli. Hosted by the Jones Memorial Library. Orleans, Jones Memorial Library, 1 Water St, 2:00 pm. Joanne Pariseau, (802) 754-6660.

March 15 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Four: "Doers and Shapers." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores progressivism in education and state law from Act 250 to civil unions. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Martha Canfield Memorial Free Library. Arlington, Martha Canfield Library, 528 E Arlington Rd, 2:00 pm. Phyllis Skidmore, (802) 375-6153.

March 17 — Book Discussion: Selected Works of Flannery O'Connor by Flannery O'Connor. Part of the Masters of the Short Story series. Short stories, as a modern genre, emerged in the early 19th Century, and mushroomed with the development of journals and magazines. This series reflects both the short story’s 19th Century roots and its later development as a 20th Century art form. Led by Mary Hays. Hosted by the Morrill Memorial and Harris Library. Strafford, Morrill Memorial and Harris Library, 220 Justin Morrill Mem Hwy, 7:00 pm. Rebecca Seibel, (802) 765-4037.

March 19 — Lifelong Learning Music Series: Heitor Villa-Lobos. Grant Event. The music of Villa-Lobos, a 20th century Brazilian composer, combines influences of his native folk music and European classical styles. His unique background and musical imagination make him a stand-out among classical composers. Part of the Lifelong Learning Music Series, a great opportunity to increase your musical knowledge in a relaxed and fun environment. Led by Lois Price, a flutist who teaches music appreciation at Champlain College. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 7:00 pm. Jennifer Murray, (802) 652-7076.

March 19 — Book Discussion: Joplin's Ghost by Tananarive Due. Part of the Orchestrated Stories: Novels about Composers series. Following on the heels of our popular “Portraits of the Artists: Novels about Painters” series, “Orchestrated Stories” offers fictional interpretations of four eminent composers: Mozart, Schumann, Vivaldi, and Joplin. What does it mean to translate these historical figures and their canonical compositions to novel form? Can fiction be as useful a tool for interpreting real people as biography? Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Warren Public Library. Warren Public Library, 413 Main St, 9:00 am. Anne Dillon, (802) 496-3656.

March 22 — Book Discussion: The Giver by Lois Lowry. Part of the American Stories Across the Generations series. This series focuses on the theme of relationships between children and older adults. Led by Francette B Cerulli. Hosted by the Jones Memorial Library. Orleans, Jones Memorial Library, 1 Water St, 2:00 pm. Joanne Pariseau, (802) 754-6660.

March 22 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Six: "People's Power." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores contemporary tensions over energy, independence, climate, and the state's future. Led by Jon Margolis. Hosted by the Montgomery Town Library. Montgomery Center, 2:00 pm. June Abramowitz, (802) 326-4239.

March 23 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Six: "People's Power." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores contemporary tensions over energy, independence, climate, and the state's future. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Latham Memorial Library. Thetford, Latham Memorial Library, 16 Library Ln, 7:00 pm. Peter Blodgett, (802) 785-4361.

March 23 — Book Discussion: Ake: The Years of Childhood by Wole Soyinka. Part of the Never Setting Sun: The Heyday of the British Colonial Empire series. At one point, the United Kingdom's reach extended all the way around the globe. Discover the complexities of colonialism in these works set in India and Africa. Led by Jon Margolis. Hosted by the Barton Public Library. Barton, Barton Public Library, 100 Church St, 6:30 pm. Contact the library, (802) 525-6524.

March 26 — Book Discussion: Summer by Edith Wharton. Part of the Romantic Ideal series. The characters in these works seek out their ideal of love, happiness, and fulfillment with consequences that are by turns bittersweet, tragic, noble, unconventional, and even comic. But can an ideal ever be met? Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Blake Memorial Library. East Corinth, Blake Memorial Library, 676 Village Road, 4:30 pm. Ken Linge, (802) 439-5338.

March 28 — Vermont and the Civil War. From Cedar Creek to Gettysburg, Vermonters were central to the Union cause. Vermont author and Civil War historian Howard Coffin addresses the Vermont contribution to the Civil War. Hosted by the Rockingham Free Public Library. Bellows Falls, Rockingham Free Public Library, 65 Westminster St, 1:00 pm. Anne Dempsey, (802) 463-4270.

March 29 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Five: "Ceres' Children." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores participatory democracy and ethics in conservation and farming. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Martha Canfield Memorial Free Library. Arlington, Martha Canfield Library, 528 E Arlington Rd, 2:00 pm. Phyllis Skidmore, (802) 375-6153.

April 2015

April 1 — Book Discussion: Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption by Stephen King. Part of the From Page to Screen series. When is it true that the movie's good, but the book is better? What makes it so? What does a book or the script of a play have to offer that its film version does not? Conversely, what does film offer that print cannot? Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7076.

April 1 — An Evening with Julia Alvarez. At the outset of National Poetry Month, celebrated author and activist Julia Alvarez speaks and reads from her early and recent work.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Ilsley Public Library. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main St, 7:00 pm. Chris Kirby, (802) 388-4095.

April 1 — A Slight Sound at Evening: Why Thoreau’s Quiet Writing Endures Today. Drawing upon Thoreau’s journals and letters, Dartmouth professor Nancy Jay Crumbine examines the spirituality, inherent and explicit, in his walking and writing life.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Manchester Community Library. Manchester, First Congregational Church, 7:00 pm. Cindy Waters, (802) 362-2607.

April 1 — Homer’s Odyssey, Narratives of Return for Combat Veterans. Dartmouth Classics professor Roberta Stewart describes her work with veterans and examines what the story of Odysseus’s long journey home from war has to say to combat veterans, and to all of us.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 1171 Main St, 7:00 pm. Robert Joly, (802) 748-8291.

April 1 — The National Security Agency: The Law, the Media, and the Legacy of Edward Snowden. Retired NSA executive Bill Sullivan discusses the NSA’s foreign intelligence mission as well as its process, governance, and oversight, and examines media reports based on material provided by Edward Snowden.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St, 7:00 pm. Jerry Carbone, (802) 254-5290.

April 1 — The Human Face of War: Combat, Healing, and the Humanities. Dr. Edward Tick, director of the Soldier’s Heart Clinic, explores the inner world of combat, the universal dimensions of veterans’ wounding, and a philosophy of healing combat’s consequences—recognizing that while war most directly affects veterans, it wounds us all.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Goodrich Memorial Library. Newport, Goodrich Memorial Library, 202 Main St, 7:00 pm. Carol Nicholson, (802) 334-7902.

April 1 — The Argentine Pope. Pope Francis’s emphasis on the poor and marginalized has energized social justice in the Roman Catholic Church. Author Martin Weinstein, professor emeritus at William Paterson University, examines the foundations of the Pope’s philosophy, the history of the church in Latin America, and the rise of liberation theology.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Rutland Free Library. Rutland Free Library, 10 Court St, 7:00 pm. Abby Noland, (802) 773-1860.

April 1 — Vermont War Memorials, Statuary, and Cemeteries: from the Revolution to 9/11. In this illustrated talk, Vermont authors Bill Mares and Bill Lipke share Vermont’s commemorative history, from Ethan Allen to the War on Terror Memorial at Camp Johnson in Colchester.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

April 5 — Book Discussion: Tuck Everlasting by Natalie Babbitt. Part of the American Stories Across the Generations series. This series focuses on the theme of relationships between children and older adults. Led by Francette B Cerulli. Hosted by the Jones Memorial Library. Orleans, Jones Memorial Library, 1 Water St, 2:00 pm. Joanne Pariseau, (802) 754-6660.

April 6 — Book Discussion: Nixon Agonistes: The Crisis of a Self-Made Man by Garry Willis. Part of the 20th Century Presidents: Post-WWII series. Which 20th-century U.S. Presidents most dramatically impacted the direction of the country—for good or ill—and its standing in the world? Arguably, every president has had a dramatic impact on the country, but some have loomed larger than others—and larger than life. This series examines four 20th-century presidents who left a strong imprint on America prior to and during World War Two. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 7:30 pm. Advance Signup Required, Natalie Albers, (802) 985-0659.

April 8 — Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater: American Masterpiece. H. Nicholas Muller III, retired executive director of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, shares the story — and controversy — behind the house, widely considered an architectural masterpiece.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Montpelier, Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main St, 7:00 pm. Rachel Senechal, (802) 223-3338.

April 8 — The Medici Grand Dukes: Art and Politics in Renaissance Florence. UVM professor Kelley Helmstutler Di Dio considers how, despite scandals and even murder, the Medici Grand Dukes maintained their power for nearly two centuries by giving gifts of art by the great Florentine masters to kings, popes, and emperors. A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Essex Junction, Brownell Library, 6 Lincoln St, 7:00 pm. Wendy Hysko, (802) 878-6954.

April 8 — Book Discussion: The Mistress of Spices by Chitra Divakaruni. Part of the Gastronomy: Novels about Food and Culture series. One of the most tantalizing ways to learn about a culture is through its food. These mouth-watering novels highlight how what we eat is closely aligned with who we are. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Walden Community Library. West Danville, Walden Community Library, 135 Cahoon Farm Rd, 7:00 pm. Anne Smith, (802) 563-2630.

April 9 — Book Discussion: Later Life by A.R. Gurney. Part of the Romantic Ideal series. The characters in these works seek out their ideal of love, happiness, and fulfillment with consequences that are by turns bittersweet, tragic, noble, unconventional, and even comic. But can an ideal ever be met? Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Blake Memorial Library. East Corinth, Blake Memorial Library, 676 Village Road, 4:30 pm. Ken Linge, (802) 439-5338.

April 9 — Book Discussion: Vivaldi's Virgins by Barbara Quick. Part of the Orchestrated Stories: Novels about Composers series. Following on the heels of our popular “Portraits of the Artists: Novels about Painters” series, “Orchestrated Stories” offers fictional interpretations of four eminent composers: Mozart, Schumann, Vivaldi, and Joplin. What does it mean to translate these historical figures and their canonical compositions to novel form? Can fiction be as useful a tool for interpreting real people as biography? Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Warren Public Library. Waitsfield, Joslin Memorial Library, 4391 Main St, 9:00 am. Anne Dillon, (802) 496-3656.

April 12 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Six: "People's Power." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores contemporary tensions over energy, independence, climate, and the state's future. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Martha Canfield Memorial Free Library. Arlington, Martha Canfield Library, 528 E Arlington Rd, 2:00 pm. Phyllis Skidmore, (802) 375-6153.

April 14 — Book Discussion: Park City by Ann Beattie. Part of the Masters of the Short Story series. Short stories, as a modern genre, emerged in the early 19th Century, and mushroomed with the development of journals and magazines. This series reflects both the short story’s 19th Century roots and its later development as a 20th Century art form. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Morrill Memorial and Harris Library. Strafford, Morrill Memorial and Harris Library, 220 Justin Morrill Mem Hwy, 7:00 pm. Rebecca Seibel, (802) 765-4037.

April 14 — One Regiment’s Story in the Civil War: The Ninth Vermont, 1862–1865. From guarding Confederate prisoners incarcerated at Camp Douglas, Illinois, to the woods of coastal North Carolina and finally to the gates of Richmond, the Ninth Vermont Regiment earned a reputation for being well-disciplined and steadfast under fire. Although lacking the renown of other Vermont units, it represented the state well throughout its history. Civil War historian Donald Wickman offers listeners tales of the Ninth Vermont, highlighted by the stories of some of the 1,878 Vermonters who comprised it, as it became one of the most traveled regiments in the Civil War. George Stannard commanded the regiment and the talk will also look at his leadership of the unit. Cohosted by the The Milton Historical Society and the General Stannard House Committee. Hosted by the Milton Public Library. Milton Public Library, 39 Bombardier Rd, 6:30 pm. MaryBeth Peterson, (802) 893-4644.

April 15 — Book Discussion: The Hours by Michael Cunningham. Grant Event. Led by Francette Cerulli. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073 or lynne@kimballlibrary.org.

April 19 — Film Screening and Discussion: The Hours. Grant Event. This 2002 film, based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Michael Cunningham, tells how the Virgina Woolf novel Mrs. Dalloway affects three women in three generations (played by Nicole Kidman, Meryl Streep and Julianne Moore) having to deal with suicide in their lives. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Tickets $9; discounts for Chandler Film Society members and students. Anyone who cannot afford the price of admission can request a discount at the box office. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 N Main St, 6:00 pm. Emily Crosby, (802) 431-0204 or emily@chandler-arts.org.

April 27 — Book Discussion: Our Sister Killjoy: Or, Reflections from a Black-Eyed Squint by Ama Ata Aidoo. Part of the Never Setting Sun: The Heyday of the British Colonial Empire series. At one point, the United Kingdom's reach extended all the way around the globe. Discover the complexities of colonialism in these works set in India and Africa. Led by Jon Margolis. Hosted by the Barton Public Library. Barton Public Library, 100 Church St, 6:30 pm. Contact the library, (802) 525-6524.

April 30 — Book Discussion: Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert. Part of the Romantic Ideal series. The characters in these works seek out their ideal of love, happiness, and fulfillment with consequences that are by turns bittersweet, tragic, noble, unconventional, and even comic. But can an ideal ever be met? Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Blake Memorial Library. East Corinth, Blake Memorial Library, 676 Village Road, 4:30 pm. Ken Linge, (802) 439-5338.

May 2015

May 2 — Colonial Meetinghouses of New England. New England’s colonial meetinghouses embody an important yet little-known chapter in American history. Built mostly with tax money, they served as both places of worship and places for town meetings, and were the centers of life in colonial New England communities. Using photographs of the few surviving “mint condition” meetinghouses as illustrations, this presentation by photographer Paul Wainwright tells the story of the society that built and used them, and the lasting impact they have had on American culture. Hosted by the Town of Rockingham. Bellows Falls, Lower Theater, Rockingham Town Hall, 7 Village Square, 10:00 am. Contact the Rockingham Development Office, (802) 463-3456 x110.

May 4 — Book Discussion: President Reagan: The Role of a Lifetime by Lou Cannon. Part of the 20th Century Presidents: Post-WWII series. Which 20th-century U.S. Presidents most dramatically impacted the direction of the country—for good or ill—and its standing in the world? Arguably, every president has had a dramatic impact on the country, but some have loomed larger than others—and larger than life. This series examines four 20th-century presidents who left a strong imprint on America prior to and during World War Two. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 7:30 pm. Advance Signup Required, Natalie Albers, (802) 985-0659.

May 6 — Inventing Ethan Allen. After more than two centuries, Ethan Allen remains the most remembered figure in Vermont’s past. Historian H. Nicholas Muller III considers how the memory of Allen coincides with the reality and why his story was shaped and reshaped after his death.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Ilsley Public Library. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main St, 7:00 pm. Chris Kirby, (802) 388-4095.

May 6 — Redeemer President: The Significance of Jimmy Carter. Dartmouth professor of American religious history Randall Balmer examines the rise of the Religious Right and Jimmy Carter, a Southern Baptist Sunday school teacher elected president with the support of evangelicals, who turned against him four years later.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Manchester Community Library. Manchester, First Congregational Church, 7:00 pm. Cindy Waters, (802) 362-2607.

May 6 — Margaret Bourke-White, Courageous Photographer. Actress and educator Sally Matson portrays Margaret Bourke-White, whose influential images of industry, war zones, and world leaders established her as a groundbreaking photographer in the 1930s to 1950s.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 1171 Main St, 7:00 pm. Robert Joly, (802) 748-8291.

May 6 — Calvin Coolidge: More Than Two Words. Drawing from Coolidge’s letters, speeches, and autobiography, Jim Cooke brings Coolidge to life and helps us understand why Will Rogers said, “Mr. Coolidge has more subtle humor than almost any public man I ever met.”A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Essex Junction, Brownell Library, 6 Lincoln St, 7:00 pm. Wendy Hysko, (802) 878-6954.

May 6 — Life in the Studio. David Macaulay, award-winning author and illustrator of Castle, Cathedral, and The Way We Work, discusses current projects and current challenges in his work.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Goodrich Memorial Library. Newport, Goodrich Memorial Library, 202 Main St, 7:00 pm. Carol Nicholson, (802) 334-7902.

May 6 — The Buildings of Rutland. Architectural historian Curtis B. Johnson illustrates the richness of Rutland’s architecture. NOTE: on Saturday, May 9, Johnson leads a walking tour of “the Hill” neighborhood, 1:00 pm-2:30 pm. Meet at Rutland Free Library’s main entrance. A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Rutland Free Library. Rutland Free Library, 10 Court St, 7:00 pm. Abby Noland, (802) 773-1860.

May 6 — A Historian’s Reflections on War. A Vietnam veteran and author of seven military biographies and histories, Norwich University graduate Carlo D’Este reflects on his own experience, the experience of others who have seen war firsthand, and war’s impact on humanity.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Montpelier, Kellogg- Hubbard Library, 135 Main St, 7:00 pm. Rachel Senechal, (802) 223-3338.

May 6 — The Duel: Aaron Burr vs. Alexander Hamilton. Was it murder or suicide when the vice president of the United States killed the first secretary of the treasury in a duel? Willard Sterne Randall, award-winning biographer of Hamilton and five other Founding Fathers, tells this fascinating story.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St, 7:00 pm. Jerry Carbone, (802) 254-5290.

May 6 — All About Eve. Dartmouth professor of religion Susan Ackerman considers both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the Adam and Eve story and how recent scholarship on women and the Bible pushes us to rethink our common assumptions about Eve.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

May 13 — Book Discussion: The Last Chinese Chef by Nicole Mones. Part of the Gastronomy: Novels about Food and Culture series. One of the most tantalizing ways to learn about a culture is through its food. These mouth-watering novels highlight how what we eat is closely aligned with who we are. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Walden Community Library. West Danville, Walden Community Library, 135 Cahoon Farm Rd, 7:00 pm. Anne Smith, (802) 563-2630.

July 2015

July 13 — A High Price to Pay, A Heavy Burden to Bear: One Family’s Civil War Story. Abel Morrill, Sr., was an early settler of Cabot, Vermont. He was a respected farmer and maple sugar producer for much of the 19th century. His story reflects the hardship and heartbreak suffered by those who lived at the time of America’s greatest conflict, the Civil War. David Book’s portrayal of Abel Morrill profiles life before the war and life as it was affected by the war. Drawing on primary resources, Book’s monologue describes with historical accuracy life in mid-19th century Vermont and is a story that could be repeated by many families in every town in Vermont during this era. Hosted by the Woodstock Historical Society. Woodstock, John Cotton Dana Research Library, 26 Elm St, 7:00 pm. Jennie Shurtleff, (802) 457-1822.

August 2015

August 10 — Colonial Meetinghouses of New England. New England’s colonial meetinghouses embody an important yet little-known chapter in American history. Built mostly with tax money, they served as both places of worship and places for town meetings, and were the centers of life in colonial New England communities. Using photographs of the few surviving “mint condition” meetinghouses as illustrations, this presentation by photographer Paul Wainwright tells the story of the society that built and used them, and the lasting impact they have had on American culture. Hosted by the Woodstock Historical Society. Woodstock, John Cotton Dana Research Library, 26 Elm St, 7:00 pm. Jennie Shurtleff, (802) 457-1822.

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