_

Vermont Humanities Events Statewide

Last Updated 7/24/2014 1:00:13 PM

Vermont Humanities Events Statewide     

 

Through Fall 2014— Covered Bridges of Woodstock Exhibit. Grant Event. The exhibit celebrates Woodstock's covered bridges past and present on the occasion of the Taftsville bridge re-opening. Visit www.woodstockhistorical. org or call for hours. Hosted by the Woodstock Historical Society and supported by a VHC grant. Woodstock History Center, 26 Elm St. Jennie Shurtleff, (802) 457-1822.

Through Spring 2015 — Cycles of Change: Farming in Norwich. Grant Event. An exhibit documenting agricultural heritage through the stories of eight working farms. On display through spring 2015. Visit norwichhistory.org for more information. Hosted by the Norwich Historical Society and supported by a VHC grant. Norwich Historical Society, 277 Main St. Norwich Historical Society, (802) 649-0124 or info@norwichhistory.org.

July

July 24 — Hand in Hand Community Dinner: Wonder. A Vermont Reads Event. Join us for a five course meal celebrating Wonder by R.J. Palacio. Free and open to the public. Hosted by the Hand in Hand Community Service Inc.. Woodstock, North Universalist Chapel Society, 7 Church St, 5:00 pm. Lauren Wilder, (802) 229-1777 or handinhandcommunityservice@gmail.com.

July 25 — Bringing Wonder to Life. A Vermont Reads Event. Sam Drazin of Changing Perspectives will use his personal experiences to help participants in this all-ages program learn more about the challenges faced by Auggie, the main character of Wonder. Part of the Bookstock Festival. Books available through Hand in Hand Community Service. Hosted by the Hand in Hand Community Service Inc.. Woodstock Inn, Wilder Room, 14 The Green, 1:00 pm. Lauren Wilder, (802) 229-1777 or handinhandcommunityservice@gmail.com.

July 25–27 — Bookstock: The Green Mountain Literary Festival 2014. Grant Event. Bookstock brings forty poets, writers, and artists to read from and discuss their work. It also includes a huge used book sale, exhibition tent, music, and food. Hosted by Sustainable Woodstock and supported by a VHC grant. Woodstock, Various locations. Ron Miller, info@bookstockvt.org.

July 26 — Bookstock: Wonder Booth. A Vermont Reads Event. Stop by our booth in the Vendor tent for information on VHC and Vermont Reads, Hand in Hand Community Service, Arts Poetica, Sherburne Memorial Library, and Killington Arts Guild. Hosted by the Hand in Hand Community Service Inc.. Woodstock, The Green, 10:00 am. Lauren Wilder, (802) 229-1777 or handinhandcommunityservice@gmail.com.

July 28 — Book Discussion: Wonder. A Vermont Reads Event. Laurel Sanborn of Vermont Family Network will join the discussion. All ages are welcome; books are available at the front desk. Hosted by the Dorothy Alling Memorial Library. Williston, Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 21 Library Ln, 6:30 pm. Kathy DeLuca, (802) 878-4918.

July 28–August 1Time Travelers Camp. Grant Event. Children aged eight to twelve will explore local history at the museum via site study, role playing, handskills, and journaling. Fee $140; some scholarships available. Brochure and registration forms at oldstonehousemuseum.org. Presented by Old Stone House Museum and supported by a VHC grant. Brownington, Old Stone House Museum. Susanna Bowman, 802.754.2022.

July 29 — Book Discussion: Affliction by Russell Banks. Part of the New England Uncovered series. What lies hidden beneath the popular images of New England with its white spires and Yankee frugality? More than meets the eye! Led by Jon Margolis. Hosted by the Glover Public Library. Glover Public Library, 51 Bean Hill Rd, 6:30 pm. Toni Eubanks, (802) 525-4365.

July 30 — Inventive Vermonters: A Sampling of Farm Tools and Implements. Vermonters have always been inventive, especially when it comes to agricultural innovations. Time- and labor-saving inventions that ease the hard work of farming have always been important in our rural, agricultural state. In this illustrated lecture, retired engineer Paul Wood presents a sampling of farm tools, implements, and artifacts invented or produced in Vermont, examining their use, uniqueness of design, and the often fascinating stories of the inventors themselves. Hosted by the Waterbury Historical Society. Waterbury Center Community Church, 3582 Waterbury-Stowe Rd, 7:30 pm. Cindy Parks, (802) 585-4913.

July 31 — Book Discussion: Blanche Cleans Up by Barbara Neely. Part of the A Mysterious Lens on American Culture series. In these mysteries, mayhem and murder play out against a cultural/ethnic backdrop—illuminating more than simply whodunnit. Led by William Tortolano. Hosted by the North Hero Public Library. North Hero Public Library, 3195 Us Route 2, 7:00 pm. Judy Poquette, (802) 372-5458.

July 31 — The Western Abenaki: History and Culture. Who were the native people of Vermont and how did they live? This lecture, by Jeanne Brink, examines the importance in Abenaki society of elders and children, the environment, and the continuance of lifeways and traditions. Hosted by the Sudbury Community Club. Brandon, Sudbury Meetinghouse, 2702 Route 30, 7:00 pm. Larry Rowe, (802) 623-6432.

August

August 3 — Clarina Howard Nichols and the Campaign for Women's Rights in the 1850s. Clarina Howard Nichols is known among Vermont historians as an early advocate of women's rights and the first woman to address the Vermont Legislature. What drove her to the Vermont Statehouse and later to the Kansas Constitutional Convention Hall of 1859? How did she confront the social taboos against women speaking in public? This program, by Lyn Blackwell, will explore the origins of Nichols' extraordinary political career and her relationship with the broader campaign for women's rights in the 1850s. Hosted by the Orleans County Historical Society. Brownington Village Church, Hinman Settler Road, 3:00 pm. Amy Palaia, (802) 754 -2022.

August 6 — Book Discussion: Mating by Norman Rush. Part of the The Romantic Ideal series. The characters in these works seek out their ideal of love, happiness, and fulfillment with consequences that are by turns bittersweet, tragic, noble, unconventional, and even comic. But can an ideal ever be met? Led by Richard M Wizansky. Hosted by the Dover Free Library. East Dover, Dover Free Library, 22 Holland Rd, 7:00 pm. John Flores, (802) 348-7488.

August 6 — Book Discussion: Minaret by Leila Aboulela. Part of the Literary Reflections on Islam series. Islam has long provided a source of inspiration through which Muslims experience, understand, and guide their everyday lives. This series, developed jointly by the American Library Association and the NEH, offers literary reflections on Muslim piety and communal concepts such as ethics, governance, knowledge, and identity, and reveals transformations in faith and identity, as Muslims living at different times and in different places have interpreted Islam. Led by Jean Gerber. Hosted by the George Peabody Library. Post Mills, George Peabody Library, 7922 Route 113, 7:00 pm. Peter Blodgett, (802) 785 -4361.

August 7 — A Celebration of the Life in Poetry of Vermont Poet Galway Kinnell. Grant Event. Vermonters are invited into the Statehouse to celebrate the life and work of former Vermont Poet Laureate Galway Kinnell. His most cherished and notable poems will be read by his fellow poets, followed by a reception with the poet in the Cedar Creek Room. Hosted by the Back Roads Readings and supported by a VHC grant. Montpelier, Vermont State House, 3:00 pm. Lisa von Kann, (802) 633-4956 or backroadsreadings@gmail.com.

August 8 — Wonder Ice Cream Social: Art Show and Movie. A Vermont Reads Event. Showcase your art, poetry, or songs inspired by the themes of kindness and acceptance found in Wonder by R.J. Palacio. Followed by a screening of I Am Sam. In the film, a mentally challenged man fights for custody of his 7-year-old daughter, and in the process teaches his cold-hearted lawyer the value of love and family. Hosted by the Dorothy Alling Memorial Library. Williston, Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 21 Library Ln, 1:00 pm. Kathy DeLuca, (802) 878-4918.

August 9 — A High Price to Pay, A Heavy Burden to Bear: One Family’s Civil War Story. Abel Morrill, Sr., was an early settler of Cabot, Vermont. He was a respected farmer and maple sugar producer for much of the 19th century. His story reflects the hardship and heartbreak suffered by those who lived at the time of America’s greatest conflict, the Civil War. David Book’s portrayal of Abel Morrill profiles life before the war and life as it was affected by the war. Drawing on primary resources, Book’s monologue describes with historical accuracy life in mid-19th century Vermont and is a story that could be repeated by many families in every town in Vermont during this era. Hosted by the Vermont Division for Historic Preservation. Plymouth, President Calvin Coolidge Museum & Education Center, 3780 Route 100A, 2:00 pm. William Jenney, (802) 672-3773.

August 10 — The Old Country Fiddler: Charles Ross Taggart, Vermont’s Traveling Entertainer. Having grown up in Topsham, Vermont, Charles Ross Taggart went on to a forty-year career performing in countless stage shows across the country, including the famous Red Path Chautauqua circuit. A fiddler, piano player, humorist, singer, and ventriloquist, he made at least 25 recordings with the Victor, Edison, and Columbia companies, and appeared in a talking movie picture four years before Al Jolson starred in The Jazz Singer. Fiddler Adam Boyce portrays Mr. Taggart near the end of his career, circa 1936, sharing recollections of his life and career interspersed with live fiddling and humorous sketches. Hosted by the Mount Holly Town Library. Belmont, Mount Holly Town Library, 26 Maple Hill Rd, 4:00 pm. Joan McCallum, (802) 259 -2318.

August 11 — Book Discussion: Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England by William Cronon. Part of the When Cultures Meet: First Contact in the Lake Champlain Basin series. This series commemorates the Lake Champlain Quadricentennial in 2009. In 1609, Frenchman Samuel de Champlain became the first European to visit the 110- mile lake that now bears his name. (In 1608, Champlain had founded Quebec City.) In fiction and nonfiction, the series explores the ramifications of contact between Europeans and the native inhabitants in the Champlain Basin and New England generally, and the ensuing history of the region. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Quechee Library. Quechee, Library, 1957 Main Street, 4:30 pm. Kate Schaal, (802) 295-1232.

August 13 — Book Discussion: Middlemarch by George Eliot. Part of the B.I.G. (Big, Intense, Good) series. Classic works of literature of a certain size and heft—both literal and figurative— can be a little daunting to tackle on one’s own, and in one big gulp. A multi-session group is the ideal environment in which to relish them—and the rewards are many. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Kimball Public Library. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073.

August 15 — A Sense of Place: Vermont's Farm Legacy. The character of a place is shaped by its cultural heritage and folklife, the informal traditions of family and community that guide the ways in which a person plans a meal, treats a neighbor, or understands civic responsibility. In Vermont the cultural legacy of farming has strongly influenced the identity of Vermonters, and it is these distinctive traditions, which have persisted even with the decline in farm numbers, that help make the state unique. This lecture by Gregory Sharrow explores the fabric of farm culture in the past and probes its relationship to the world of Vermont today. Hosted by the Landgrove Meetinghouse. Landgrove Meetinghouse, 88 Landgrove Rd, 4:00 pm. Priscilla Grayson, (802) 824-6867.

August 15 — The Roaring '20s in Fox Trot Tempo. Perhaps more than any other decade, the history of the 1920s is captured in the popular music of the day. From Lindbergh to Ford's Model A, from the Scopes Trial to the Florida land boom and the crossword puzzle craze, the music of the 1920s tells the story. This lecture by Martin Bryan traces historical events, from the sublime to the ridiculous, and illustrates them with archival recordings. Hosted by the West Fairlee Historical Society. West Fairlee, Congregational Church, 954 Vt Rte 113, 7:00 pm. Bonnie Cray, (802) 333-9655.

August 16 — Journalism and War Coverage. It may take years for the objective truth of a war to be told. It is challenging enough for a reporter to cover city hall without the obstacles of bullets and bombs. This lecture, by Mark Timney, explores war news coverage since the Civil War and examines the impact of new technologies and the practice of embedding reporters upon war reporting. Hosted by the Pettee Memorial Library. Wilmington, Memorial Hall, 4 W Main St, 7:00 pm. Allison Smith, (802) 464-8557.

August 17 — Shipwrecks of Lake Champlain. Learn about Lake Champlain's most harrowing shipwreck stories from the Revolutionary War to the present day with underwater archaeologist Adam Kane. With over 300 wrecks in its dark, cold waters, Lake Champlain has witnessed feats of heroism and terrible tragedies. Take a memorable tour through slides, drawings, and video of what lies beneath the waves. Hosted by the Weston Historical Society. Weston, Old Parish Church, 644 S Main St, Route 100, 1:30 pm. Robert Brandt, (802) 824-5486.

August 18 — Book Discussion: What Work Is by Philip Levine. Part of the Blue Collar America series. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Burnham Memorial Library. Colchester, Burnham Memorial Library, 898 Main St, 6:00 pm. Kelly Tomaseski, (802) 264-5660.

August 18–24 — Writer's Forum. Grant Event. Fifteen established writers and teachers as well as a host of aspirants and students examine the theme of "Tradition and The Craft of Writing" through workshops, colloquia, and readings. Hosted by the Greensboro Arts Alliance and Residency and supported by a VHC grant. Greensboro, Lakeview Inn, 295 Breezy Ave. Charles McAteer, (802) 533-7487 or charles.mcateer@greensboroartsalliance.com.

August 20 — Book Discussion: Later Life by A.R. Gurney. Part of the The Romantic Ideal series. The characters in these works seek out their ideal of love, happiness, and fulfillment with consequences that are by turns bittersweet, tragic, noble, unconventional, and even comic. But can an ideal ever be met? Led by Richard M Wizansky. Hosted by the Dover Free Library. East Dover, Dover Free Library, 22 Holland Rd, 7:00 pm. John Flores, (802) 348-7488.

August 20 — 1964: A Watershed Year in Vermont’s Political (and Cultural) History. In 1964, the Republican Party lost its tight-fisted grasp on Vermont politics, starting the swing of the political pendulum from Vermont as bastion of conservative republicanism to a state with a highly diversified political climate featuring progressive and even radical politics. Novelist Deborah Luskin, whose extensive research into the politics of mid-century Vermont was undertaken in the writing of Into the Wilderness, a love story that takes place against the two major political events of that year, shows how the shift is more complex and more nuanced than mere politics. Hosted by the Brookfield Free Public Library. Brookfield, Old Town Hall, 93 Stone Rd, 7:00 pm. Laura Rochat, (802) 276-3358.

August 21 — Book Discussion: Blood of the Prodigal by P. L. Gaus. Part of the A Mysterious Lens on American Culture series. In these mysteries, mayhem and murder play out against a cultural/ethnic backdrop—illuminating more than simply whodunnit. Led by William Tortolano. Hosted by the North Hero Public Library. North Hero Public Library, 3195 Us Route 2, 7:00 pm. Judy Poquette, (802) 372-5458.

August 25 — Beatrix Potter Revisited. Using books, props, and bibliography, Helene Lang presents the life of Beatrix Potter, highlighting her artistic talent, her writing ability where every word is appropriate and perfectly arranged, and finally, her years as a countrywoman raising Herdwick sheep. The presentation takes her from her Victorian childhood, through the years of her little books, to her final thirty years of farming in England's Lake District. Hosted by the Enosburg Historical Society. Enosburg Falls, West Enosburg United Methodist Church, 1725 Tyler Branch Rd, 7:00 pm. Shirley Duso, (802) 933-4394.

August 26 — Book Discussion: A Brother's Blood by Michael White. Part of the New England Uncovered series. What lies hidden beneath the popular images of New England with its white spires and Yankee frugality? More than meets the eye! Led by Jon Margolis. Hosted by the Glover Public Library. Glover Public Library, 51 Bean Hill Rd, 6:30 pm. Toni Eubanks, (802) 525-4365.

August 26 — The Old Country Fiddler: Charles Ross Taggart, Vermont’s Traveling Entertainer. Having grown up in Topsham, Vermont, Charles Ross Taggart went on to a forty-year career performing in countless stage shows across the country, including the famous Red Path Chautauqua circuit. A fiddler, piano player, humorist, singer, and ventriloquist, he made at least 25 recordings with the Victor, Edison, and Columbia companies, and appeared in a talking movie picture four years before Al Jolson starred in The Jazz Singer. Fiddler Adam Boyce portrays Mr. Taggart near the end of his career, circa 1936, sharing recollections of his life and career interspersed with live fiddling and humorous sketches. Hosted by the Barnard Historical Society. Barnard, Barnard Historical Society, 6415 VT Route 12, 7:00 pm. Caz Rozonewski, (802) 234 -9080.

August 27 — Agatha Christie: Creator of Miss Jane Marple and Hercule Poirot. In this living history performance by Helene Lang, Ms. Christie tells you how a typewriter in Torguay spawned over 80 mysteries and created Miss Jane Marple and Hercule Poirot. Learn about her life and walk in her footsteps in England. Discover why she was so knowledgeable about the poisons used in her stories; what influences in her life informed the creation of her famous leading detectives; some personal information about her family; and why she went to Yorkshire under an assumed name. Hosted by the Hartford Library. Hartford, Greater Hartford United Church of Christ, 1721 Maple Street, 7:00 pm. Nadine Hodgdon, (802) 296-2568.

September

September 3 — The Battle of Lake Champlain. On September 11, 1814—187 years before the attack on the World Trade Center—British Army and Royal Naval forces attacked a regular American army and navy at Cumberland Bay in Plattsburgh. Although backed by Vermont Militia, the Americans were outnumbered nearly four to one. If the invaders had won, they could have taken Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. This largest and most decisive battle of the War of 1812 determined the future of our nation; it is a story of great courage and human tragedy told by Colonel David Fitz-Enz. Hosted by the Milton Historical Society and Museum. Milton Historical Society and Museum, 13 School Street, 7:00 pm. Allison Belisle, (802) 363-2598.

September 7 — The Vermont Civil War Songbook. Dressed in period costume, singer/researcher Linda Radtke shares songs from Vermont during the Civil War period, with engaging commentary and letters from Vermont soldiers. Seldom-heard songs from the Vermont Historical Society include the comic but poignant "Grafted into the Army," "Yankee Robinson at Bull Run," "Neath the Pines of Vermont" (in which a soldier returns home to die), a satirical song about Jefferson Davis, and sentimental ballads from Vermont during the period. Linda Radtke is joined by pianist Arthur Zorn in this program for all audiences that brings the Civil War period in Vermont to life through music and letters. Hosted by the Green Mountain Perkins Academy and Historical Association. South Woodstock, Green Mountain Perkins Academy, 1 Academy Circle, 2:00 pm. Mark Curran, (802) 457-3251.

September 8 — Book Discussion: Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America by Barbara Ehrenreich. Part of the Blue Collar America series. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum-wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 7:30 pm. Advance Signup Required, Natalie Albers, (802) 985-0659.

September 9 — Book Discussion: The Arabian Nights by Muhsin Mahdi, ed., Husain Haddawy, trans.. Part of the Literary Reflections on Islam series. Islam has long provided a source of inspiration through which Muslims experience, understand, and guide their everyday lives. This series, developed jointly by the American Library Association and the NEH, offers literary reflections on Muslim piety and communal concepts such as ethics, governance, knowledge, and identity, and reveals transformations in faith and identity, as Muslims living at different times and in different places have interpreted Islam. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Mary McKenna, (802) 296-2191.

September 10 — Book Discussion: Middlemarch by George Eliot. Part of the B.I.G. (Big, Intense, Good) series. Classic works of literature of a certain size and heft—both literal and figurative— can be a little daunting to tackle on one’s own, and in one big gulp. A multi-session group is the ideal environment in which to relish them—and the rewards are many. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Kimball Public Library. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073.

September 10 — The Unethical(?) Journalist. Journalists are sometimes obligated by their role in a democratic society to cause harm to others in order to provide important news. This lecture by Keene State College professor Mark Timney draws on his teaching interests, as well as his background in television news, in considering a journalistic professional morality that supersedes a standard public morality, examining how these two standards of morality affect the public’s view of journalists. Hosted by the Addison County Retired Teachers Association. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main St, 10:30 am. Marilyn Needham, (802) 388-3384.

September 10 — The Changing Music Scene of the 1940s. Catamount Arts’ Martin Bryan takes a look at the popular music scene of the 1940s—how it was affected by war, the musicians’ union, and the war’s aftermath—and how music styles evolved from the beginning of the decade to its end. Bryan’s talk includes selections from original 78 rpm recordings, ranging from Big Band swing to wartime music, from popular Broadway musicals to bebop, and more. Americans marched off to war and returned to a changed society; Bryan documents that time through its music. Hosted by the Valley Terrace Assisted Living. White River Junction, Valley Terrace Assisted Living, 2820 Christian St, 2:30 pm. Bobbi Trombley, (802) 280-1910.

September 12 — Dance at Bennington College: 82 Years of Moving Through: Opening Reception. Grant Event. A gallery exhibition of photographs from the 1930s to the present, drawn from the dance archives of Bennington College. Hosted by the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts and supported by a VHC grant. Burlington, Amy E. Tarrant Gallery at the Flynn, 153 Main St, 5:30 pm. Nancy Abbott-Hourigan, (802) 652-4505.

September 13–November 29 — Dance at Bennington College: 82 Years of Moving Through. Grant Event. A gallery exhibition of photographs from the 1930s to the present, drawn from the dance archives of Bennington College. Open Saturdays 11 am to 4 pm. Hosted by the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts and supported by a VHC grant.. Burlington, Amy E. Tarrant Gallery at the Flynn, 153 Main St. Nancy Abbott-Hourigan, (802) 652-4505.

September 15 — Book Discussion: The Cliff Walk: A Memoir of a Job Lost and a Life Found by Don Snyder. Part of the Blue Collar America series. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Burnham Memorial Library. Colchester, Burnham Memorial Library, 898 Main St, 6:00 pm. Kelly Tomaseski, (802) 264-5660.

September 15 — A Sense of Place: Vermont's Farm Legacy. The character of a place is shaped by its cultural heritage and folklife, the informal traditions of family and community that guide the ways in which a person plans a meal, treats a neighbor, or understands civic responsibility. In Vermont the cultural legacy of farming has strongly influenced the identity of Vermonters, and it is these distinctive traditions, which have persisted even with the decline in farm numbers, that help make the state unique. This lecture by Gregory Sharrow explores the fabric of farm culture in the past and probes its relationship to the world of Vermont today. Hosted by the Monkton Museum and Historical Society. Monkton, Fire Station, 3747 States Prison Hollow Rd, 7:00 pm. Gill B Coates, (802) 482-2277.

September 15 — Anne Frank’s Neighbors: What Did They Do? Although Anne Frank’s Diary is the most widely read nonfiction book in the world after the Bible, little attention has been paid to her neighbors—the people who lived alongside the Jewish population as persecution intensified. Mary Fillmore examines the choices they faced and the decisions they made in the face of those choices. Why did some people ignore the situation, while others felt compelled to resist? What can we learn from them as we face the humanitarian crises of our own time? Hosted by the Dorothy Alling Memorial Library. Williston, Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 21 Library Ln, 6:00 pm. Kathy DeLuca, (802) 878-4918.

September 17 — The Vermont Civil War Songbook. Dressed in period costume, singer/researcher Linda Radtke shares songs from Vermont during the Civil War period, with engaging commentary and letters from Vermont soldiers. Seldom-heard songs from the Vermont Historical Society include the comic but poignant "Grafted into the Army," "Yankee Robinson at Bull Run," "Neath the Pines of Vermont" (in which a soldier returns home to die), a satirical song about Jefferson Davis, and sentimental ballads from Vermont during the period. Linda Radtke is joined by pianist Arthur Zorn in this program for all audiences that brings the Civil War period in Vermont to life through music and letters. Hosted by the St. Albans Historical Society and Museum. St. Albans Historical Museum, Bliss Auditorium, 9 Church St, 7:00 pm. Cindy Rutkowski, (802) 524-6897.

September 18 — Alfred Hitchcock and the Art of Suspense. Hitchcock famously said “Some films are slices of life; mine are slices of cake.” His career spanned forty years and many film eras. Film expert Rick Winston will discuss the evolution of Hitchcock’s craft, exploring his favorite themes, his relationship with his collaborators, and his wary sense of humour no matter how grisly the subject matter. By drawing on twelve film clips, starting with his 1925 silent The Lodger and continuing through to his Hollywood classics such as Notorious and Rear Window, Winston will illuminate the arc of Hitchcock’s brilliant career. Hosted by the Bristol Historical Society. Bristol, Howden Hall Community Center, 19 West St, 7:00 pm. Reg Dearborn, (802) 453-3526.

September 19 — Vermont and the Civil War. From Cedar Creek to Gettysburg, Vermonters were central to the Union cause. Vermont author and Civil War historian Howard Coffin addresses the Vermont contribution to the Civil War. Hosted by the St. Albans Historical Society and Museum. St. Albans Historical Museum, 9 Church St, 7:00 pm. Cindy Rutkowski, (802) 524-6897.

September 19–21 — Burlington Book Festival 2014. Grant Event. The Queen City's 10th Annual celebration of the written word offers free readings, signings, workshops, panels, exhibits, and special events featuring literary luminaries from around the world and just around the corner! Headliners include Kim Addonizio, Jeff Danziger, Katherine Paterson, Jennifer Haigh, Chase Twichell, Leslie Jamison and Vijay Seshadri. Hosted by the Stern Center for Language and Learning and supported by a VHC grant.. Burlington, various locations, 1 Main St. Rick Kisonak, (802) 658-3328.

September 21 — Vermont History through Song. Singer and researcher Linda Radtke, joined by pianist Arthur Zorn, brings Vermont history to life with engaging commentary about the songs found in the Vermont Historical Society's collection of sheet music. Dressed in period costume, Ms. Radtke takes listeners through state history, using the songs Vermonters published in their communities. Hosted by the Estey Organ Museum. Brattleboro, Estey Organ Museum, 108 Birge St, 3:00 pm. Philip Stimmel, (802) 246-8366.

September 23 — Book Discussion: Wonder. A Vermont Reads Event. Facilitated by Francette Cerulli. Hosted by the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Montpelier, Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Hayes Room, 135 Main St, 6:30 pm. Rachel Senechal, (802) 223-3338.

September 27 — Colonial Meetinghouses of New England. New England’s colonial meetinghouses embody an important yet little-known chapter in American history. Built mostly with tax money, they served as both places of worship and places for town meetings, and were the centers of life in colonial New England communities. Using photographs of the few surviving “mint condition” meetinghouses as illustrations, this presentation by photographer Paul Wainwright tells the story of the society that built and used them, and the lasting impact they have had on American culture. Hosted by the Grafton Historical Society. Grafton White Church, 9 Main St, 4:00 pm. Patricia Jeziorski, (802) 843-2584.

September 30 — Book Discussion: I’m a Stranger Here Myself: Notes on Returning to America After Twenty Years Away by Bill Bryson. Part of the New England Uncovered series. What lies hidden beneath the popular images of New England with its white spires and Yankee frugality? More than meets the eye! Led by Jon Margolis. Hosted by the Glover Public Library. Hosted by the Glover Public Library. Glover Public Library, 51 Bean Hill Rd, 6:30 pm. Toni Eubanks, (802) 525-4365.

September 30 — Book Discussion: The Conference of the Birds by Farid al-Din Attar. Part of the Literary Reflections on Islam series. Islam has long provided a source of inspiration through which Muslims experience, understand, and guide their everyday lives. This series, developed jointly by the American Library Association and the NEH, offers literary reflections on Muslim piety and communal concepts such as ethics, governance, knowledge, and identity, and reveals transformations in faith and identity, as Muslims living at different times and in different places have interpreted Islam. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Mary McKenna, (802) 296-2191.

September 30 — Fairfax Reads Wonder. A Vermont Reads Event. Copies of the book available in advance at the bakery. At the event we will choose a character, read a chapter, and discuss it. Snacks provided. Attendees encouraged to bring a canned good for the food shelf. Hosted by the Fairfax Community Library. Fairfax, Foothills Bakery, 1123 Main St, 1123 Main St, 6:30 pm. Annette Hansen, (802) 849-2420.

October

October 1 — Alfred Hitchcock and the Art of Suspense. Hitchcock famously said “Some films are slices of life; mine are slices of cake.” His career spanned forty years and many film eras. Film expert Rick Winston will discuss the evolution of Hitchcock’s craft, exploring his favorite themes, his relationship with his collaborators, and his wry sense of humour no matter how grisly the subject matter. By drawing on twelve film clips, starting with his 1925 silent The Lodger and continuing through to his Hollywood classics such as Notorious and Rear Window, Winston will illuminate the arc of Hitchcock’s brilliant career. Hosted by the Milton Historical Society and Museum. Milton Historical Society and Museum, 13 School Street, 7:00 pm. Allison Belisle, (802) 363-2598.

October 2 — Vermont History through Song. Singer and researcher Linda Radtke, joined by pianist Arthur Zorn, brings Vermont history to life with engaging commentary about the songs found in the Vermont Historical Society's collection of sheet music. Dressed in period costume, Ms. Radtke takes listeners through state history, using the songs Vermonters published in their communities. Hosted by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute St. Johnsbury. St Johnsbury, Catamount Arts, 115 Eastern Ave, 1:30 pm. Beth Williams, (802) 748-3642.

October 2–5 — Brattleboro Literary Festival. Grant Event. The 13th annual festival is a celebration of literature and writing featuring Pulitzer Prize winning authors Joseph Ellis and Paul Muldoon plus 40 more emerging and established authors. Hosted by the Building a Better Brattleboro and supported by a VHC grant. Brattleboro, various downtown locations. Sandy Rouse, (802) 579-7414 or brattleboroliteraryfestival.org.

October 6 — Book Discussion: Empire Falls by Richard Russo. Part of the Blue Collar America series. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum-wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 7:30 pm. Advance Signup Required, Natalie Albers, (802) 985-0659.

October 7 — 400 Miles Down the Connecticut River. New England's longest river, the Connecticut, is rich in history. Michael Tougias, author of fourteen books about New England, offers a narrated slide presentation that takes the viewer down the entire 410 miles of the river, discussing history from the days of loggers, Indian Wars, steamships, and canals. Hosted by the Jeudevine Memorial Library. Hardwick, Memorial Building, 20 Church St, 7:00 pm. Lisa Sammet, (802) 472-5948.

October 7 — Alfred Hitchcock and the Art of Suspense. Hitchcock famously said “Some films are slices of life; mine are slices of cake.” His career spanned forty years and many film eras. Film expert Rick Winston will discuss the evolution of Hitchcock’s craft, exploring his favorite themes, his relationship with his collaborators, and his wry sense of humor no matter how grisly the subject matter. By drawing on twelve film clips, starting with his 1925 silent The Lodger and continuing through to his Hollywood classics such as Notorious and Rear Window, Winston will illuminate the arc of Hitchcock’s brilliant career. Hosted by the Martha Canfield Memorial Free Library. Arlington, Martha Canfield Library, 528 East Arlington Road, 7:00 pm. Phyllis Skidmore, (802) 375-6153.

October 8 — Vermont and the Civil War. From Cedar Creek to Gettysburg, Vermonters were central to the Union cause. Vermont author and Civil War historian Howard Coffin addresses the Vermont contribution to the Civil War. Hosted by the Montgomery Town Library. Montgomery Center, Montgomery Town Hall, 98 Main St, 7:00 pm. Patrick Farmer, (802) 326 -2211.

October 8 — Book Discussion: Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston. Part of the African American Experience series. This seminal work of both African American and women's literature vibrantly narrates the protagonist’s ripening from a vibrant but voiceless teenage girl into a woman with her finger on the trigger of her own destiny. Led by Gina Logan. Hosted by the Kimball Public Library. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073.

October 12 — The Battle of Lake Champlain. On September 11, 1814—187 years before the attack on the World Trade Center—British Army and Royal Naval forces attacked a regular American army and navy at Cumberland Bay in Plattsburgh. Although backed by Vermont Militia, the Americans were outnumbered nearly four to one. If the invaders had won, they could have taken Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. This largest and most decisive battle of the War of 1812 determined the future of our nation; it is a story of great courage and human tragedy told by Colonel David Fitz-Enz. Hosted by the Woodstock Historical Society. Woodstock History Center, 26 Elm St, 2:00 pm. Jennie Shurtleff, (802) 457-1822.

October 13 — Book Discussion: Lydia Cassatt Reading the Morning Paper by Harriet Chessman. Part of the Portraits of the Artists series. These books feature fictional interpretations of famous artists. What happens when the visual arts and the literary arts meet? How do fiction writers interpret the lives of famous painters, and the canvases they leave behind? Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Fletcher Free Library. Burlington, Heineberg Senior Center, 14 Heineberg Rd, 1:00 pm. Barbara Shatara, (802) 865-7211 or Pam Slattery, (802) 863-3982.

October 15 — Inventive Vermonters: A Sampling of Farm Tools and Implements. Vermonters have always been inventive, especially when it comes to agricultural innovations. Time- and labor-saving inventions that ease the hard work of farming have always been important in our rural, agricultural state. In this illustrated lecture, retired engineer Paul Wood presents a sampling of farm tools, implements, and artifacts invented or produced in Vermont, examining their use, uniqueness of design, and the often fascinating stories of the inventors themselves. Hosted by the Pawlett Historical Society. Pawlet Public Library, 141 School St, 2:00 pm. Steve Williams, (802) 645-9529.

October 16 — Alfred Hitchcock and the Art of Suspense. Hitchcock famously said “Some films are slices of life; mine are slices of cake.” His career spanned forty years and many film eras. Film expert Rick Winston will discuss the evolution of Hitchcock’s craft, exploring his favorite themes, his relationship with his collaborators, and his wry sense of humour no matter how grisly the subject matter. By drawing on twelve film clips, starting with his 1925 silent The Lodger and continuing through to his Hollywood classics such as Notorious and Rear Window, Winston will illuminate the arc of Hitchcock’s brilliant career. Hosted by the Bristol Historical Society. Bristol, American Legion Post 19, 56 Airport Dr, 7:30 pm. Sylvia Coffin, (802) 453-3439.

October 19 — Vermont History through Song. Singer and researcher Linda Radtke, joined by pianist Arthur Zorn, brings Vermont history to life with engaging commentary about the songs found in the Vermont Historical Society's collection of sheet music. Dressed in period costume, Ms. Radtke takes listeners through state history, using the songs Vermonters published in their communities. Hosted by the Rupert Historical Society. Rupert Congregational Church, 2890 VT Route 153, 3:00 pm. Gene Higgins, (802) 394-7738.

October 21 — Book Discussion: Dreams of Trespass by Fatima Mernissi. Part of the Literary Reflections on Islam series. Islam has long provided a source of inspiration through which Muslims experience, understand, and guide their everyday lives. This series, developed jointly by the American Library Association and the NEH, offers literary reflections on Muslim piety and communal concepts such as ethics, governance, knowledge, and identity, and reveals transformations in faith and identity, as Muslims living at different times and in different places have interpreted Islam. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Mary McKenna, (802) 296-2191.

October 22 — Book Discussion: The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler. Part of the From Page to Screen series. When is it true that the movie's good, but the book is better? What makes it so? What does a book or the script of a play have to offer that its film version does not? Conversely, what does film offer that print cannot? Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Louise Murphy, (802) 652-7076.

October 27 — Book Discussion: Girl with a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier. Part of the Portraits of the Artists series. These books feature fictional interpretations of famous artists. What happens when the visual arts and the literary arts meet? How do fiction writers interpret the lives of famous painters, and the canvases they leave behind? Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Fletcher Free Library. Burlington, Heineberg Senior Center, 14 Heineberg Rd, 1:00 pm. Barbara Shatara, (802) 865-7211 or Pam Slattery, (802) 863-3982.

November

November 3 — Book Discussion: What Work Is by Philip Levine. Part of the Blue Collar America series. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum-wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 7:30 pm. Advance Signup Required, Natalie Albers, (802) 985-0659.

November 5 — Vermont History through Song. Singer and researcher Linda Radtke, joined by pianist Arthur Zorn, brings Vermont history to life with engaging commentary about the songs found in the Vermont Historical Society's collection of sheet music. Dressed in period costume, Ms. Radtke takes listeners through state history, using the songs Vermonters published in their communities. Hosted by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Lamoille Valley. Morrisville, River Arts, 74 Pleasant St., 1:30 pm. Millie Marron, (802) 253-9011.

November 10 — Book Discussion: La Tour Dreams of the Wolf Girl by David Huddle. Part of the Portraits of the Artists series. These books feature fictional interpretations of famous artists. What happens when the visual arts and the literary arts meet? How do fiction writers interpret the lives of famous painters, and the canvases they leave behind? Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Fletcher Free Library. Burlington, Heineberg Senior Center, 14 Heineberg Rd, 1:00 pm. Barbara Shatara, (802) 865-7211 or Pam Slattery, (802) 863-3982.

November 11 — Book Discussion: Minaret by Leila Aboulela. Part of the Literary Reflections on Islam series. Islam has long provided a source of inspiration through which Muslims experience, understand, and guide their everyday lives. This series, developed jointly by the American Library Association and the NEH, offers literary reflections on Muslim piety and communal concepts such as ethics, governance, knowledge, and identity, and reveals transformations in faith and identity, as Muslims living at different times and in different places have interpreted Islam. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Mary McKenna, (802) 296 -2191.

November 13 — Inventive Vermonters: A Sampling of Farm Tools and Implements. Vermonters have always been inventive, especially when it comes to agricultural innovations. Time- and laborsaving inventions that ease the hard work of farming have always been important in our rural, agricultural state. In this illustrated lecture, retired engineer Paul Wood presents a sampling of farm tools, implements, and artifacts invented or produced in Vermont, examining their use, uniqueness of design, and the often fascinating stories of the inventors themselves. Hosted by the Starksboro Historical Society. Starksboro, Starksboro Public Library, 2827 Route 116, 7:00 pm. Robert Stokes, (802) 453-3068.

November 14–15 — VHC 2014 Fall Conference: A Fire Never Extinguished: How America’s Civil War Continues to Shape Civic and Cultural Life in America. Many of the issues associated with the Civil War resonate today—in Vermont and throughout the nation. VHC’s fall conference (five months before the end of the sesquicentennial of the Civil War) will examine the influence that the War has had and continues to have, and will seek to identify lessons vital to American democracy that still can be learned from the War and its aftermath as we continue to build “a more perfect union” in the twenty-first century. Presented in collaboration with the Vermont Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission. More details. Burlington, University of Vermont, Dudley H. Davis Center. Max Matthews, (802) 262-2626 x304.

December

December 3 — Book Discussion: Berlin Stories by Christopher Isherwood. Part of the From Page to Screen series. When is it true that the movie's good, but the book is better? What makes it so? What does a book or the script of a play have to offer that its film version does not? Conversely, what does film offer that print cannot? Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Louise Murphy, (802) 652-7076.

December 8 — Book Discussion: Frida by Barbara Mujica. Part of the Portraits of the Artists series. These books feature fictional interpretations of famous artists. What happens when the visual arts and the literary arts meet? How do fiction writers interpret the lives of famous painters, and the canvases they leave behind? Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Fletcher Free Library. Burlington, Heineberg Senior Center, 14 Heineberg Rd, 1:00 pm. Barbara Shatara, (802) 865-7211 or Pam Slattery, (802) 863-3982.

December 8 — Book Discussion: The Cliff Walk: A Memoir of a Job Lost and a Life Found by Don Snyder. Part of the Blue Collar America series. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum-wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 7:30 pm. Advance Signup Required, Natalie Albers, (802) 985-0659.

February 2015

February 4 — Book Discussion: Out of Africa by Isak Dinesen. Part of the From Page to Screen series. When is it true that the movie's good, but the book is better? What makes it so? What does a book or the script of a play have to offer that its film version does not? Conversely, what does film offer that print cannot? Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Louise Murphy, (802) 652-7076.

March 2015

March 4 — Book Discussion: Shoeless Joe by W. P. Kinsella. Part of the From Page to Screen series. When is it true that the movie's good, but the book is better? What makes it so? What does a book or the script of a play have to offer that its film version does not? Conversely, what does film offer that print cannot? Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Louise Murphy, (802) 652-7076.

April 2015

April 1 — Book Discussion: Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption by Stephen King. Part of the From Page to Screen series. When is it true that the movie's good, but the book is better? What makes it so? What does a book or the script of a play have to offer that its film version does not? Conversely, what does film offer that print cannot? Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Louise Murphy, (802) 652-7076.

_

Counties

Last Updated 6/7/2011 11:15:20 AM

Calendar by County

 

 

Submit Your VHC Event

Are you a Vermont Reads or VHC-grant recipient? Submit your events so we can publicize them through our calendar.

_
Vermont.gov :: Accessibility Policy :: Users with Special Needs :: Privacy Policy
Copyright 2011-2012 State of Vermont :: All Rights Reserved Login