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Vermont Humanities Events Statewide

Last Updated 8/27/2014 3:52:22 PM

Vermont Humanities Events Statewide     

 

Through Fall 2014— Covered Bridges of Woodstock Exhibit. Grant Event. The exhibit celebrates Woodstock's covered bridges past and present on the occasion of the Taftsville bridge re-opening. Visit www.woodstockhistorical. org or call for hours. Hosted by the Woodstock Historical Society and supported by a VHC grant. Woodstock History Center, 26 Elm St. Jennie Shurtleff, (802) 457-1822.

Through Spring 2015 — Cycles of Change: Farming in Norwich. Grant Event. An exhibit documenting agricultural heritage through the stories of eight working farms. On display through spring 2015. Visit norwichhistory.org for more information. Hosted by the Norwich Historical Society and supported by a VHC grant. Norwich Historical Society, 277 Main St. Norwich Historical Society, (802) 649-0124 or info@norwichhistory.org.

August

August 27 — Agatha Christie: Creator of Miss Jane Marple and Hercule Poirot. In this living history performance by Helene Lang, Ms. Christie tells you how a typewriter in Torguay spawned over 80 mysteries and created Miss Jane Marple and Hercule Poirot. Learn about her life and walk in her footsteps in England. Discover why she was so knowledgeable about the poisons used in her stories; what influences in her life informed the creation of her famous leading detectives; some personal information about her family; and why she went to Yorkshire under an assumed name. Hosted by the Hartford Library. Hartford, Greater Hartford United Church of Christ, 1721 Maple Street, 7:00 pm. Nadine Hodgdon, (802) 296-2568.

September

September 3 — The Battle of Lake Champlain. On September 11, 1814—187 years before the attack on the World Trade Center—British Army and Royal Naval forces attacked a regular American army and navy at Cumberland Bay in Plattsburgh. Although backed by Vermont Militia, the Americans were outnumbered nearly four to one. If the invaders had won, they could have taken Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. This largest and most decisive battle of the War of 1812 determined the future of our nation; it is a story of great courage and human tragedy told by Colonel David Fitz-Enz. Hosted by the Milton Historical Society and Museum. Milton Historical Society and Museum, 13 School Street, 7:00 pm. Allison Belisle, (802) 363-2598.

September 3 — Film Screening: Share My Kingdom. A Vermont Reads Event. Watch and discuss this award-winning film showcasing three professional artists who also happen to have developmental disabilities. Hosted by the Baldwin Memorial Library. Wells River, Congregational Church, 76 S Main St, 7:00 pm. Peggy Hewes, (802) 757-2693.

September 7 — The Vermont Civil War Songbook. Dressed in period costume, singer/researcher Linda Radtke shares songs from Vermont during the Civil War period, with engaging commentary and letters from Vermont soldiers. Seldom-heard songs from the Vermont Historical Society include the comic but poignant "Grafted into the Army," "Yankee Robinson at Bull Run," "Neath the Pines of Vermont" (in which a soldier returns home to die), a satirical song about Jefferson Davis, and sentimental ballads from Vermont during the period. Linda Radtke is joined by pianist Arthur Zorn in this program for all audiences that brings the Civil War period in Vermont to life through music and letters. Hosted by the Green Mountain Perkins Academy and Historical Association. South Woodstock, Green Mountain Perkins Academy, 1 Academy Circle, 2:00 pm. Mark Curran, (802) 457-3251.

September 8 — Book Discussion: Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America by Barbara Ehrenreich. Part of the Blue Collar America series. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum-wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 7:30 pm. Advance Signup Required, Natalie Albers, (802) 985-0659.

September 9 — Book Discussion: The Arabian Nights by Muhsin Mahdi, ed., Husain Haddawy, trans.. Part of the Literary Reflections on Islam series. Islam has long provided a source of inspiration through which Muslims experience, understand, and guide their everyday lives. This series, developed jointly by the American Library Association and the NEH, offers literary reflections on Muslim piety and communal concepts such as ethics, governance, knowledge, and identity, and reveals transformations in faith and identity, as Muslims living at different times and in different places have interpreted Islam. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Mary McKenna, (802) 296-2191.

September 9 — Disappearing Alphabets and the Future of the Written Word. What does the age of Digital Convergence, Twitter, and eBooks mean for the future of the written word? Writer/carver/painter Tim Brookes offers remarkable and thought-provoking perspective on this question by looking at thirteen forms of writing from all over the world that are in danger of extinction. He displays a sample of each script, leading a discussion on how technology will help —and always has helped—define the nature of communication, and shows how the story of a culture can be seen in its writing—even if that writing is (as in these examples) beautiful, bizarre, utterly unfamiliar, and disappearing. Hosted by the Martha Canfield Memorial Free Library. Arlington, Martha Canfield Library, 528 E Arlington Rd, 7:00 pm. Phyllis Skidmore, (802) 375-6153.

September 10 — Book Discussion: Middlemarch by George Eliot. Part of the B.I.G. (Big, Intense, Good) series. Classic works of literature of a certain size and heft—both literal and figurative— can be a little daunting to tackle on one’s own, and in one big gulp. A multi-session group is the ideal environment in which to relish them—and the rewards are many. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Kimball Public Library. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073.

September 10 — The Unethical(?) Journalist. Journalists are sometimes obligated by their role in a democratic society to cause harm to others in order to provide important news. This lecture by Keene State College professor Mark Timney draws on his teaching interests, as well as his background in television news, in considering a journalistic professional morality that supersedes a standard public morality, examining how these two standards of morality affect the public’s view of journalists. Hosted by the Addison County Retired Teachers Association. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main St, 10:30 am. Marilyn Needham, (802) 388-3384.

September 10 — The Changing Music Scene of the 1940s. Catamount Arts’ Martin Bryan takes a look at the popular music scene of the 1940s—how it was affected by war, the musicians’ union, and the war’s aftermath—and how music styles evolved from the beginning of the decade to its end. Bryan’s talk includes selections from original 78 rpm recordings, ranging from Big Band swing to wartime music, from popular Broadway musicals to bebop, and more. Americans marched off to war and returned to a changed society; Bryan documents that time through its music. Hosted by the Valley Terrace Assisted Living. White River Junction, Valley Terrace Assisted Living, 2820 Christian St, 2:30 pm. Bobbi Trombley, (802) 280-1910.

September 12 — Dance at Bennington College: 80 Years of Moving Through: Opening Reception. Grant Event. A gallery exhibition of photographs from the 1930s to the present, drawn from the dance archives of Bennington College. Hosted by the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts and supported by a VHC grant. Burlington, Amy E. Tarrant Gallery at the Flynn, 153 Main St, 5:30 pm. Nancy Abbott-Hourigan, (802) 652-4505.

September 13 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part One: "A Very New Idea." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores the Native and Colonial roots from which Vermont grew. Led by Elayne Clift. Hosted by the Pettee Memorial Library. Wilmington, Memorial Hall, 14 W Main St, 7:00 pm. Allison Smith, (802) 464-8557.

September 13–November 29 — Dance at Bennington College: 80 Years of Moving Through. Grant Event. A gallery exhibition of photographs from the 1930s to the present, drawn from the dance archives of Bennington College. Open Saturdays 11 am to 4 pm. Hosted by the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts and supported by a VHC grant.. Burlington, Amy E. Tarrant Gallery at the Flynn, 153 Main St. Nancy Abbott-Hourigan, (802) 652-4505.

September 14 — Book Discussion: Billy Budd by Herman Melville. Part of the The New England Character series. These works by New England authors examine the personality and values of the region. Led by Rachael Cohen. Hosted by the Dailey Memorial Library. Derby, Dailey Memorial Library, 101 Junior High Dr, 1:30 pm. Barbara Whitehill, (802) 766-5063.

September 15 — A Sense of Place: Vermont's Farm Legacy. The character of a place is shaped by its cultural heritage and folklife, the informal traditions of family and community that guide the ways in which a person plans a meal, treats a neighbor, or understands civic responsibility. In Vermont the cultural legacy of farming has strongly influenced the identity of Vermonters, and it is these distinctive traditions, which have persisted even with the decline in farm numbers, that help make the state unique. This lecture by Gregory Sharrow explores the fabric of farm culture in the past and probes its relationship to the world of Vermont today. Hosted by the Monkton Museum and Historical Society. Monkton, Fire Station, 3747 States Prison Hollow Rd, 7:00 pm. Gill B Coates, (802) 482-2277.

September 17 — Anne Frank’s Neighbors: What Did They Do? Although Anne Frank’s Diary is the most widely read nonfiction book in the world after the Bible, little attention has been paid to her neighbors—the people who lived alongside the Jewish population as persecution intensified. Mary Fillmore examines the choices they faced and the decisions they made in the face of those choices. Why did some people ignore the situation, while others felt compelled to resist? What can we learn from them as we face the humanitarian crises of our own time? Hosted by the Dorothy Alling Memorial Library. Williston, Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 21 Library Ln, 6:00 pm. Kathy DeLuca, (802) 878-4918.

September 17 — The Vermont Civil War Songbook. Dressed in period costume, singer/researcher Linda Radtke shares songs from Vermont during the Civil War period, with engaging commentary and letters from Vermont soldiers. Seldom-heard songs from the Vermont Historical Society include the comic but poignant "Grafted into the Army," "Yankee Robinson at Bull Run," "Neath the Pines of Vermont" (in which a soldier returns home to die), a satirical song about Jefferson Davis, and sentimental ballads from Vermont during the period. Linda Radtke is joined by pianist Arthur Zorn in this program for all audiences that brings the Civil War period in Vermont to life through music and letters. Hosted by the St. Albans Historical Society and Museum. St. Albans Historical Museum, Bliss Auditorium, 9 Church St, 7:00 pm. Cindy Rutkowski, (802) 524-6897.

September 17 — Book Discussion: The Third Man by Graham Greene. Grant Event. Led by Howard Norman. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073 or lynne@kimballlibrary.org.

September 17 — Book Discussion: Wonder. A Vermont Reads Event. For 4 weeks we will read and discuss Wonder by R.J. Palacio, exploring topics and doing activities related to the book. Open to adults and youth 9 and older. Hosted by the Brown Public Library. Northfield, Brown Public Library, 93 S Main St, 5:00 pm. Sarah Snow, (802) 485-4621.

September 17 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part One: "A Very New Idea." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores the Native and Colonial roots from which Vermont grew. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Hartland Public Library. Hartland Public Library, 153 US Route 5, 153 Route 5, 6:30 pm. Theresa Gregory, (802) 436-2473.

September 18 — Lifelong Learning Music Series: Antonio Vivaldi. Grant Event. Vivaldi was one of the Baroque era’s most successful composers. His Italian style concertos such as The Four Seasons were admired and emulated by no less a musician than J.S. Bach, and led to a surge of instrumental music throughout Europe. Although some of his music was composed for opera houses and aristocratic patrons, most was written for the girls at the orphanage where he held a position for much of his life. Part of the Lifelong Learning Music Series, a great opportunity to increase your musical knowledge in a relaxed and fun environment. Led by Lois Price, a flutist who teaches music appreciation at Champlain College. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 7:00 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7080.

September 18 — Alfred Hitchcock and the Art of Suspense. Hitchcock famously said “Some films are slices of life; mine are slices of cake.” His career spanned forty years and many film eras. Film expert Rick Winston will discuss the evolution of Hitchcock’s craft, exploring his favorite themes, his relationship with his collaborators, and his wary sense of humour no matter how grisly the subject matter. By drawing on twelve film clips, starting with his 1925 silent The Lodger and continuing through to his Hollywood classics such as Notorious and Rear Window, Winston will illuminate the arc of Hitchcock’s brilliant career. Hosted by the Bristol Historical Society. Bristol, Howden Hall Community Center, 19 West St, 7:00 pm. Reg Dearborn, (802) 453-3526.

September 18 — 13,000 Sheep in Norwich? Grant Event. Alan Berolzheimer gives an introductory lecture to establish the historical context of the town and region, specifically examining settlement patterns and agricultural change. Part of the “Reading the Agricultural Landscape” series, engaging residents as active learners, historians, and participants in their community. Cost: $10 for all three workshops or $5 per workshop. Space is limited and reservations are recommended. Hosted by the Norwich Historical Society. Norwich Historical Society, 277 Main St, 7:00 pm. Norwich Historical Society, (802) 649-0124 or info@norwichhistory.org.

September 19 — Vermont and the Civil War. From Cedar Creek to Gettysburg, Vermonters were central to the Union cause. Vermont author and Civil War historian Howard Coffin addresses the Vermont contribution to the Civil War. Hosted by the St. Albans Historical Society and Museum. St. Albans Historical Museum, 9 Church St, 7:00 pm. Cindy Rutkowski, (802) 524-6897.

September 20 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part One: "A Very New Idea." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores the Native and Colonial roots from which Vermont grew. Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Varnum Memorial Library. Jeffersonville, Varnum Memorial Library, 194 Main St, 3:00 pm. Laurie Baron, (802) 644-5669.

September 19–21 — Burlington Book Festival 2014. Grant Event. The Queen City's 10th Annual celebration of the written word offers free readings, signings, workshops, panels, exhibits, and special events featuring literary luminaries from around the world and just around the corner! Headliners include Kim Addonizio, Jeff Danziger, Katherine Paterson, Jennifer Haigh, Chase Twichell, Leslie Jamison and Vijay Seshadri. Hosted by the Stern Center for Language and Learning and supported by a VHC grant.. Burlington, various locations, 1 Main St. Rick Kisonak, (802) 658-3328.

September 21 — Vermont History through Song. Singer and researcher Linda Radtke, joined by pianist Arthur Zorn, brings Vermont history to life with engaging commentary about the songs found in the Vermont Historical Society's collection of sheet music. Dressed in period costume, Ms. Radtke takes listeners through state history, using the songs Vermonters published in their communities. Hosted by the Estey Organ Museum. Brattleboro, Estey Organ Museum, 108 Birge St, 3:00 pm. Philip Stimmel, (802) 246-8366.

September 21 — One Regiment’s Story in the Civil War: The Ninth Vermont, 1862–1865. From guarding Confederate prisoners incarcerated at Camp Douglas, Illinois, to the woods of coastal North Carolina and finally to the gates of Richmond, the Ninth Vermont Regiment earned a reputation of being well-disciplined and steadfast under fire. Although lacking the renown of other Vermont units, it represented the state well throughout its history. Civil War historian Donald Wickman offers listeners tales of the ninth Vermont, highlighted by the stories of some of the 1,878 Vermonters who comprised it, as it became one of the most traveled regiments in the Federal army. Hosted by the Middletown Springs Historical Society. Middletown Springs, Historical Society Building, 10 Park Ave, 7:30 pm. David Wright, (802) 235-2376.

September 21 — Film Screening and Discussion: The Third Man. Grant Event. This 1949 Cold War spy classic, starring Joseph Cotton and Orson Welles, is based on Graham Greene's novella. The screenplay is by Greene as well. Pulp novelist Holly Martins goes to shadowy Vienna where he finds himself investigating the mysterious death of an old friend, Harry Lime. But is Harry really dead? Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Tickets $9; discounts for Chandler Film Society members and students. Anyone who cannot afford the price of admission can request a discount at the box office. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 N Main St, 6:00 pm. Emily Crosby, (802) 431-0204 or emily@chandler-arts.org.

September 22 — Adventures in Poetry: "Efficient Novels," New England Style. This reading and group discussion, led by poet Geof Hewitt, challenges participants' perceptions of poetry with poems by contemporary New England writers. The goal is to increase each participant's awareness of the quick and dirty, direct expression awaiting anyone who goes looking for a few good poems. Hosted by the Westview Meadows at Montpelier. Montpelier, Westview Meadows, Main Dining Room, 171 Westview Meadows Rd, 2:30 pm. Diane Meeks, (802) 223-1068.

September 23 — Life in a Jar: The Irena Sendler Project. Drawing on his book Life in a Jar: The Irena Sendler Project, Dr. Jack Mayer tells the story of a holocaust hero who rescued 2,500 children from the Warsaw ghetto, and how three Kansas teenagers, 60 years later, helped to bring that hero’s forgotten story to the world. Hosted by the Cabot Public Library. Cabot, Willey Building, 3084 Main Street, 7:00 pm. Kathleen Hoyne, (802) 563-2721.

September 23 — Book Discussion: Wonder. A Vermont Reads Event. Facilitated by Francette Cerulli. Hosted by the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Montpelier, Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Hayes Room, 135 Main St, 6:30 pm. Rachel Senechal, (802) 223-3338.

September 24 — Book Discussion: Wonder. A Vermont Reads Event. For 4 weeks we will read and discuss Wonder by R.J. Palacio, exploring topics and doing activities related to the book. Open to adults and youth 9 and older. Hosted by the Brown Public Library. Northfield, Brown Public Library, 93 S Main St, 5:00 pm. Sarah Snow, (802) 485-4621.

September 27 — Colonial Meetinghouses of New England. New England’s colonial meetinghouses embody an important yet little-known chapter in American history. Built mostly with tax money, they served as both places of worship and places for town meetings, and were the centers of life in colonial New England communities. Using photographs of the few surviving “mint condition” meetinghouses as illustrations, this presentation by photographer Paul Wainwright tells the story of the society that built and used them, and the lasting impact they have had on American culture. Hosted by the Grafton Historical Society. Grafton White Church, 9 Main St, 4:00 pm. Patricia Jeziorski, (802) 843-2584.

September 27 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Two: "Under the Surface." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores labor wars, eugenics, the McCarthy era, and progressive Republicanism. Led by Deborah Lee Luskin. Hosted by the Pettee Memorial Library. Wilmington, Memorial Hall, 14 W Main St, 7:00 pm. Allison Smith, (802) 464-8557.

September 28 — Preserving the Local Harvest. Grant Event. This hands-on workshop will teach participants traditional methods of preserving the local harvest. The workshop is limited to 10 participants, and there is a $5 per person charge for supplies. Call or email to register. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich, Upper Valley Community Grange, 344 Main St, 1:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

September 30 — Book Discussion: I’m a Stranger Here Myself: Notes on Returning to America After Twenty Years Away by Bill Bryson. Part of the New England Uncovered series. What lies hidden beneath the popular images of New England with its white spires and Yankee frugality? More than meets the eye! Led by Jon Margolis. Hosted by the Glover Public Library. Hosted by the Glover Public Library. Glover Public Library, 51 Bean Hill Rd, 6:30 pm. Toni Eubanks, (802) 525-4365.

September 30 — Book Discussion: The Conference of the Birds by Farid al-Din Attar. Part of the Literary Reflections on Islam series. Islam has long provided a source of inspiration through which Muslims experience, understand, and guide their everyday lives. This series, developed jointly by the American Library Association and the NEH, offers literary reflections on Muslim piety and communal concepts such as ethics, governance, knowledge, and identity, and reveals transformations in faith and identity, as Muslims living at different times and in different places have interpreted Islam. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Mary McKenna, (802) 296-2191.

September 30 — Fairfax Reads Wonder. A Vermont Reads Event. Copies of the book available in advance at the bakery. At the event we will choose a character, read a chapter, and discuss it. Snacks provided. Attendees encouraged to bring a canned good for the food shelf. Hosted by the Fairfax Community Library. Fairfax, Foothills Bakery, 1123 Main St, 6:30 pm. Annette Hansen, (802) 849-2420.

October

October 1 — Alfred Hitchcock and the Art of Suspense. Hitchcock famously said “Some films are slices of life; mine are slices of cake.” His career spanned forty years and many film eras. Film expert Rick Winston will discuss the evolution of Hitchcock’s craft, exploring his favorite themes, his relationship with his collaborators, and his wry sense of humour no matter how grisly the subject matter. By drawing on twelve film clips, starting with his 1925 silent The Lodger and continuing through to his Hollywood classics such as Notorious and Rear Window, Winston will illuminate the arc of Hitchcock’s brilliant career. Hosted by the Milton Historical Society and Museum. Milton Historical Society and Museum, 13 School Street, 7:00 pm. Allison Belisle, (802) 363-2598.

October 1 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part One: "A Very New Idea." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores the Native and Colonial roots from which Vermont grew. Led by Alan Berolzheimer. Hosted by the Fairlee Public Library. Fairlee, Public Library, 221 US Route 5 N, 7:00 pm. Hannah Tracy, (802) 333-4716.

October 1 — Book Discussion: Wonder. A Vermont Reads Event. For 4 weeks we will read and discuss Wonder by R.J. Palacio, exploring topics and doing activities related to the book. Open to adults and youth 9 and older. Hosted by the Brown Public Library. Northfield, Brown Public Library, 93 S Main St, 5:00 pm. Sarah Snow, (802) 485-4621.

October 1 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Two: "Under the Surface." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores labor wars, eugenics, the McCarthy era, and progressive Republicanism. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Hartland Public Library. Hartland Public Library, 153 US Route 5, 6:30 pm. Theresa Gregory, (802) 436-2473.

October 1 — The Real Robert Frost. Alternatively described as a “monster of egotism” or the folksy, avuncular bard of popular legend, the real Robert Frost remains elusive. Edinboro College professor Donald Sheehy, coeditor of Frost’s recently published Complete Letters, explains why.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Ilsley Public Library. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main St, 7:00 pm. Chris Kirby, (802) 388-4095.

October 1 — A Century after World War I: Are We Sleepwalking Again? It’s been said that in 1914 Europe sleepwalked into a war no one wanted. Distinguished veteran diplomat George Jaeger considers whether current geopolitics might play out similarly.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Mark Skinner Library. Manchester, First Congregational Church, 7:00 pm. Cindy Waters, (802) 362-2607.

October 1 — Vincent Van Gogh: What Influenced Him and His Influence on Twentieth-Century Art. Art historian Carol Berry considers the personal experiences, painters, and authors that influenced Van Gogh’s work and his influence on twentieth-century artists.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 1171 Main St, 7:00 pm. Robert Joly, (802) 748-8291.

October 1 — Rumi, A Soul on Fire. Dartmouth professor Nancy Jay Crumbine reads and discusses Rumi, one of the greatest and most widely read of spiritual poets.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Essex Junction, Brownell Library, 6 Lincoln St, 7:00 pm. Wendy Hysko, (802) 878-6954.

October 1 — Stark Decency: German POWs in a New England Village. Historian Allen Koop tells the story of New Hampshire’s only World War II prisoner-of-war camp, describing how prisoners, guards, and ordinary people in the tiny village of Stark turned bitter division into camaraderie.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Goodrich Memorial Library. Newport, Goodrich Memorial Library, 202 Main St, 7:00 pm. Carol Nicholson, (802) 334-7902.

October 1 — The Costumes of Downton Abbey. Middlebury College artist-in-residence Jule Emerson discusses the fashions worn by Lady Mary and her family in the PBS series Downton Abbey.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Rutland Free Library. Rutland Free Library, 10 Court St, 7:00 pm. Randal Smathers, (802) 773-1860.

October 1 — 1814: America Forged by Fire. American sovereignty was not assured until 1814, when England acknowledged it with the Treaty of Ghent. Historian Willard Sterne Randall relates the dramatic events that saved the nation and established 1814 as a seminal year in our history.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Montpelier, Kellogg- Hubbard Library, 135 Main St, 7:00 pm. Rachel Senechal, (802) 223-3338.

October 1 — Reading for the Life of the World. Award-winning author and Vermonter Katherine Paterson considers the importance and many benefits of reading. A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St, 7:00 pm. Jerry Carbone, (802) 254-5290.

October 1 — An Evening of George Gershwin. In this performance lecture, pianist Michael Arnowitt explores the music and era of George Gershwin and performs An American in Paris and Rhapsody in Blue, among other compositions.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

October 2 — Vermont History through Song. Singer and researcher Linda Radtke, joined by pianist Arthur Zorn, brings Vermont history to life with engaging commentary about the songs found in the Vermont Historical Society's collection of sheet music. Dressed in period costume, Ms. Radtke takes listeners through state history, using the songs Vermonters published in their communities. Hosted by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute St. Johnsbury. St Johnsbury, Catamount Arts, 115 Eastern Ave, 1:30 pm. Beth Williams, (802) 748-3642.

October 2–5 — Brattleboro Literary Festival. Grant Event. The 13th annual festival is a celebration of literature and writing featuring Pulitzer Prize winning authors Joseph Ellis and Paul Muldoon plus 40 more emerging and established authors. Hosted by the Building a Better Brattleboro and supported by a VHC grant. Brattleboro, various downtown locations. Sandy Rouse, (802) 579-7414 or brattleboroliteraryfestival.org.

October 5 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie. Part Six: "People's Power." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores contemporary tensions over energy, independence, climate, and the state's future. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Richmond Free Library. Richmond Free Library, 201 Bridge St, 4:00 pm. Wendy de Forest, (802) 434-3036.

October 6 — Book Discussion: Empire Falls by Richard Russo. Part of the Blue Collar America series. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum-wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 7:30 pm. Advance Signup Required, Natalie Albers, (802) 985-0659.

October 6 — Valley Readers Book Discussion Group. A Vermont Reads Event. Join our lively book discussion group as we read Wonder by R.J. Palacio as our October pick. Hosted by the Hancock Free Public Library. Hancock Town Hall, 1091 Vermont Route 100, 6:30 pm. Jill Jesso-White, (802) 767-4128.

October 6 — Book Discussion: Lydia Cassatt Reading the Morning Paper by Harriet Chessman. Part of the Portraits of the Artists series. These books feature fictional interpretations of famous artists. What happens when the visual arts and the literary arts meet? How do fiction writers interpret the lives of famous painters, and the canvases they leave behind? Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Fletcher Free Library. Burlington, Heineberg Senior Center, 14 Heineberg Rd, 1:00 pm. Barbara Shatara, (802) 865-7211 or Pam Slattery, (802) 863-3982.

October 7 — 400 Miles Down the Connecticut River. New England's longest river, the Connecticut, is rich in history. Michael Tougias, author of fourteen books about New England, offers a narrated slide presentation that takes the viewer down the entire 410 miles of the river, discussing history from the days of loggers, Indian Wars, steamships, and canals. Hosted by the Jeudevine Memorial Library. Hardwick, Memorial Building, 20 Church St, 7:00 pm. Lisa Sammet, (802) 472-5948.

October 7 — Alfred Hitchcock and the Art of Suspense. Hitchcock famously said “Some films are slices of life; mine are slices of cake.” His career spanned forty years and many film eras. Film expert Rick Winston will discuss the evolution of Hitchcock’s craft, exploring his favorite themes, his relationship with his collaborators, and his wry sense of humor no matter how grisly the subject matter. By drawing on twelve film clips, starting with his 1925 silent The Lodger and continuing through to his Hollywood classics such as Notorious and Rear Window, Winston will illuminate the arc of Hitchcock’s brilliant career. Hosted by the Martha Canfield Memorial Free Library. Arlington, Martha Canfield Library, 528 East Arlington Road, 7:00 pm. Phyllis Skidmore, (802) 375-6153.

October 8 — Vermont and the Civil War. From Cedar Creek to Gettysburg, Vermonters were central to the Union cause. Vermont author and Civil War historian Howard Coffin addresses the Vermont contribution to the Civil War. Hosted by the Montgomery Town Library. Montgomery Center, Montgomery Town Hall, 98 Main St, 7:00 pm. Patrick Farmer, (802) 326 -2211.

October 8 — Book Discussion: Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston. Part of the African American Experience series. This seminal work of both African American and women's literature vibrantly narrates the protagonist’s ripening from a vibrant but voiceless teenage girl into a woman with her finger on the trigger of her own destiny. Led by Gina Logan. Hosted by the Kimball Public Library. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073.

October 8 — Book Discussion: Wonder. A Vermont Reads Event. For 4 weeks we will read and discuss Wonder by R.J. Palacio, exploring topics and doing activities related to the book. Open to adults and youth 9 and older. Hosted by the Brown Public Library. Northfield, Brown Public Library, 93 S Main St, 5:00 pm. Sarah Snow, (802) 485-4621.

October 8 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part One: "A Very New Idea." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores the Native and Colonial roots from which Vermont grew. Led by Dorothy Tod. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin Meeting Room, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 3:30 pm. Krista Malaney, (802) 264-5107.

October 9 — Who Lived Here? Finding the Stories of Where You Live. Grant Event. Using a Norwich farm as a case study, participants will be led through a ‘how-to’ session about researching the story of a house and a farm using deeds, tax records, maps, the census, and other historical materials. Led by Alan Berolzheimer and Sarah Rooker. Cost: $10 for all three workshops or $5 per workshop. Space is limited and reservations are recommended. Workshop leaders will also be available during the fall to work one-on-one with those wishing to conduct their own research. Hosted by the Norwich Historical Society. Norwich Historical Society, 277 Main St, 7:00 pm. Norwich Historical Society, (802) 649-0124 or info@norwichhistory.org.

October 9 — R.J. Palacio Presents 365 Days of Wonder: Mr. Browne's Book of Precepts. A Vermont Reads Event. In R.J. Palacio's novel Wonder, readers were introduced to memorable English teacher Mr. Browne and his love of precepts. Simply put, precepts are principles to live by, and the new book compiles 365 of them—one for each day of the year. This event is free and open to the public. Hosted by the Northshire Bookstore. Manchester Center, Manchester Elementary Middle School, 80 Memorial Ave, 4:30 pm. Mary Allen, (800) 437-3700.

October 12 — The Battle of Lake Champlain. On September 11, 1814—187 years before the attack on the World Trade Center—British Army and Royal Naval forces attacked a regular American army and navy at Cumberland Bay in Plattsburgh. Although backed by Vermont Militia, the Americans were outnumbered nearly four to one. If the invaders had won, they could have taken Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. This largest and most decisive battle of the War of 1812 determined the future of our nation; it is a story of great courage and human tragedy told by Colonel David Fitz-Enz. Hosted by the Woodstock Historical Society. Woodstock History Center, 26 Elm St, 2:00 pm. Jennie Shurtleff, (802) 457-1822.

October 12 — Book Discussion: Civil Disobedience and Other Essays by Henry David Thoreau. Part of the The New England Character series. These works by New England authors examine the personality and values of the region. Led by Rachael Cohen. Hosted by the Dailey Memorial Library. Derby, Dailey Memorial Library, 101 Junior High Dr, 1:30 pm. Barbara Whitehill, (802) 766-5063.

October 14 — Wonder What It's Like with Sam Drazin. A Vermont Reads Event. Sam Drazin of Changing Perspectives will present a program about improving disability awareness and understanding. He has a unique perspective as a student with a disability and a teacher in an inclusive classroom. Light refreshments will be served after the program. Hosted by the Bennington Free Library. Bennington, Southern Vermont College, 982 Mansion Dr, 7:00 pm. Linda Donigan, (802) 442-9051.

October 14 — Arming the Union: Vermont Gunmakers and the Technology that Shaped America. During the Civil War, the Union army fielded more than two million men, most of them armed with newly made, highly accurate rifles. In this illustrated lecture, historian and museum curator Carrie Brown explores the critical role that Windsor, Vermont, played in producing technology that won the war and changed American life and popular culture even after the war ended. Hosted by the Chittenden Historical Society. North Chittenden Grange Hall, 3 Lower Middle Rd, 7:00 pm. Karen Webster, (802) 483-6471.

October 15 — Book Discussion: Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw. Grant Event. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073 or lynne@kimballlibrary.org.

October 15 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Two: "Under the Surface." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores labor wars, eugenics, the McCarthy era, and progressive Republicanism. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin Meeting Room, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 3:30 pm. Krista Malaney, (802) 264 -5107.

October 16 — Alfred Hitchcock and the Art of Suspense. Hitchcock famously said “Some films are slices of life; mine are slices of cake.” His career spanned forty years and many film eras. Film expert Rick Winston will discuss the evolution of Hitchcock’s craft, exploring his favorite themes, his relationship with his collaborators, and his wry sense of humour no matter how grisly the subject matter. By drawing on twelve film clips, starting with his 1925 silent The Lodger and continuing through to his Hollywood classics such as Notorious and Rear Window, Winston will illuminate the arc of Hitchcock’s brilliant career. Hosted by the Bristol Historical Society. Bristol, American Legion Post 19, 56 Airport Dr, 7:30 pm. Sylvia Coffin, (802) 453-3439.

October 16 — Lifelong Learning Music Series: Viktor Ullmann. Grant Event. Of the many musicians who were interned at Theresienstadt concentration camp, Ullmann had had the most distinguished career at the time of his incarceration. He became mentor to other imprisoned composers, produced performances of new music, performed and served as music critic. He continued to compose under horrendous circumstances until his life was cut short in Auschwitz. Part of the Lifelong Learning Music Series, a great opportunity to increase your musical knowledge in a relaxed and fun environment. Led by Lois Price, a flutist who teaches music appreciation at Champlain College. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 7:00 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7080.

October 16 — Wonder What It's Like with Sam Drazin. A Vermont Reads Event. Sam Drazin of Changing Perspectives will present a program about improving disability awareness and understanding. He has a unique perspective as a student with a disability and a third-grade teacher. The public is invited to attend. Hosted by the Mark Skinner Library. Manchester Center, Manchester Elementary Middle School, 1:00 pm. Cindy Waters, (802) 362-2607.

October 17 — Classic Films of the 1950s. The 1950s were a fascinating time for Hollywood films. Several directors who began their careers in the silent era (Wilder, Hitchcock, Wyler) were in their prime; the studio system was in decline and independent films were gaining a foothold. New stars such as Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift, James Dean, and Audrey Hepburn were making their mark; vital issues of the time such as juvenile delinquency, conformity, and racial attitudes were addressed, however timidly, while the shadow of the Hollywood blacklist loomed. Rick Winston will show clips from several acclaimed films of various genres from that era and discuss their significance. Hosted by the Carpenter-Carse Library. Hinesburg, Carpenter-Carse Library, 69 Ballards-Corners, 7:00 pm. Jane Racer, (802) 482-2878.

October 19 — Inventive Vermonters: A Sampling of Farm Tools and Implements. Vermonters have always been inventive, especially when it comes to agricultural innovations. Time- and labor-saving inventions that ease the hard work of farming have always been important in our rural, agricultural state. In this illustrated lecture, retired engineer Paul Wood presents a sampling of farm tools, implements, and artifacts invented or produced in Vermont, examining their use, uniqueness of design, and the often fascinating stories of the inventors themselves. Hosted by the Pawlett Historical Society. Pawlet Public Library, 141 School St, 2:00 pm. Steve Williams, (802) 645-9529.

October 19 — Vermont History through Song. Singer and researcher Linda Radtke, joined by pianist Arthur Zorn, brings Vermont history to life with engaging commentary about the songs found in the Vermont Historical Society's collection of sheet music. Dressed in period costume, Ms. Radtke takes listeners through state history, using the songs Vermonters published in their communities. Hosted by the Rupert Historical Society. Rupert Congregational Church, 2890 VT Route 153, 3:00 pm. Gene Higgins, (802) 394-7738.

October 19 — Film Screening and Discussion: Pygmalion. Grant Event. George Bernard Shaw adapted his own play, in which a Victorian dialect expert, Henry Higgins (Leslie Howard), wagers that he can teach a lower-class girl, Eliza Doolittle (Wendy Hiller), to speak proper English and be taken for upper crust. The 1938 film later became the hit musical My Fair Lady. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Tickets $9; discounts for Chandler Film Society members and students. Anyone who cannot afford the price of admission can request a discount at the box office. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 N Main St, 6:00 pm. Emily Crosby, (802) 431-0204 or emily@chandler-arts.org.

October 20 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part One: "A Very New Idea." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores the Native and Colonial roots from which Vermont grew. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Mount Tabor/Danby Historical Society. Danby, Mount Tabor/Danby Historical Society, 74 S Main St, 7:00 pm. Lauren Dever, (802) 293-2265.

October 21 — Book Discussion: Dreams of Trespass by Fatima Mernissi. Part of the Literary Reflections on Islam series. Islam has long provided a source of inspiration through which Muslims experience, understand, and guide their everyday lives. This series, developed jointly by the American Library Association and the NEH, offers literary reflections on Muslim piety and communal concepts such as ethics, governance, knowledge, and identity, and reveals transformations in faith and identity, as Muslims living at different times and in different places have interpreted Islam. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Mary McKenna, (802) 296-2191.

October 22 — Book Discussion: The Big Sleep by Raymond Chandler. Part of the From Page to Screen series. When is it true that the movie's good, but the book is better? What makes it so? What does a book or the script of a play have to offer that its film version does not? Conversely, what does film offer that print cannot? Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7076.

October 22 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Three: "Refuge, Reinvention, and Revolution." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores innovation, interstates, and counter-culture. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Hartland Public Library. Hartland Public Library, 153 US Route 5, 153 Route 5, 6:30 pm. Theresa Gregory, (802) 436-2473.

October 22 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Three: "Refuge, Reinvention, and Revolution." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores innovation, interstates, and counter-culture. Led by Kenneth Peck. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin Meeting Room, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 3:30 pm. Krista Malaney, (802) 264 -5107.

October 23 — An Evening of Wonder. A Vermont Reads Event. A book discussion of R.J. Palacio's Wonder led by librarians Karson Kiesinger and Linda Donigan. Music, art, and light supper. Hosted by the Bennington Free Library. Bennington Free Library, 101 Silver St, 5:30 pm. Linda Donigan, (802) 442-9051.

October 25 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Two: "Under the Surface." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores labor wars, eugenics, the McCarthy era, and progressive Republicanism. Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Varnum Memorial Library. Jeffersonville, Varnum Memorial Library, 194 Main St, 3:00 pm. Laurie Baron, (802) 644-5669.

October 25 — Wonder: The Last Chapter Finale. A Vermont Reads Event. Join us for our concluding event with the Sanborn family. Hosted by the Jamaica Memorial Library. Jamaica, Town Hall, 3735 Vt Route 30, 1:00 pm. Karen Cawrse, (802) 874-4901.

October 25 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Three: "Refuge, Reinvention, and Revolution." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores innovation, interstates, and counter-culture. Led by Tom Fels. Hosted by the Pettee Memorial Library. Wilmington, Memorial Hall, 14 W Main St, 7:00 pm. Allison Smith, (802) 464-8557.

October 26 — Vermont History through Song. Singer and researcher Linda Radtke, joined by pianist Arthur Zorn, brings Vermont history to life with engaging commentary about the songs found in the Vermont Historical Society's collection of sheet music. Dressed in period costume, Ms. Radtke takes listeners through state history, using the songs Vermonters published in their communities. Hosted by the Brookfield Historical Society. Brookfield, Pond Village Church, 49 Ridge Rd, 4:00 pm. Gary Lord, (802) 276-3927.

October 27 — Book Discussion: Girl with a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier. Part of the Portraits of the Artists series. These books feature fictional interpretations of famous artists. What happens when the visual arts and the literary arts meet? How do fiction writers interpret the lives of famous painters, and the canvases they leave behind? Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Fletcher Free Library. Burlington, Heineberg Senior Center, 14 Heineberg Rd, 1:00 pm. Barbara Shatara, (802) 865-7211 or Pam Slattery, (802) 863-3982.

October 27 — Cold War on Film. Grant Event. In recognition of the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin wall, historian and producer Taylor Downing will discuss the making of the Turner Cold War series, specifically focusing on the Fall of the Berlin Wall episode which will be screened as part of the presentation. Hosted by the Vermont International Film Foundation. Burlington, Champlain College, Perry Hall Room 240, 251 S Willard St, 7:00 pm. Orly Yadin, (802) 660 -2600.

October 29 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Four: "Doers and Shapers." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores progressivism in education and state law from Act 250 to civil unions. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin Meeting Room, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 3:30 pm. Krista Malaney, (802) 264-5107.

October 31–November 1 — Look Back, Dance Forward: Tales of Home. Grant Event. This two-evening program stars Faustin Linyekula of Congo (October 31) in his acclaimed solo, Le Cargo, and Panaibra Gabriel Canda of Mozambique (November 1) in his expressive duet, Time and Spaces: The Marrabenta Solos, with live music by guitarist Jorge Domingos. In both pieces, the artists grapple with the complex histories of their countries by re-igniting memories of and experiences with their fathers. Hosted by the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts. Burlington, FlynnSpace, 153 Main St, 8:00 pm both evenings. Fee for performances, tickets at flynntix.org. Leigh Chandler, (802) 652-4500.

November

November 1 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Four: "Doers and Shapers." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores progressivism in education and state law from Act 250 to civil unions. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Pettee Memorial Library. Wilmington, Memorial Hall, 14 W Main St, 7:00 pm. Allison Smith, (802) 464-8557.

November 3 — Book Discussion: What Work Is by Philip Levine. Part of the Blue Collar America series. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum-wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 7:30 pm. Advance Signup Required, Natalie Albers, (802) 985-0659.

November 3 — Lincoln and Vermont. Beginning with Lincoln’s preliminary Emancipation Proclamation, and continuing through to the consecration of the National Soldiers Cemetery at Gettysburg, historian Howard Coffin traces how Lincoln’s leadership of the Federal war effort and his political canniness shaped the relationship between the president and Vermont, a state Lincoln admired though never visited. Hosted by the EastView at Middlebury. Middlebury, EastView at Middlebury, 100 Eastview Ter, 7:00 pm. EastView at Middlebury, (802) 989-7500.

November 3 — A High Price to Pay, A Heavy Burden to Bear: One Family’s Civil War Story. Abel Morrill, Sr., was an early settler of Cabot, Vermont. He was a respected farmer and maple sugar producer for much of the 19th century. His story reflects the hardship and heartbreak suffered by those who lived at the time of America’s greatest conflict, the Civil War. David Book’s portrayal of Abel Morrill profiles life before the war and life as it was affected by the war. Drawing on primary resources, Book’s monologue describes with historical accuracy life in mid-19th century Vermont and is a story that could be repeated by many families in every town in Vermont during this era. Hosted by the Hardwick Historical Society. Hardwick Historical Society, 47 Depot St, 7:30 pm. Elwyn Daniels, (802) 586-7565.

November 5 — Vermont History through Song. Singer and researcher Linda Radtke, joined by pianist Arthur Zorn, brings Vermont history to life with engaging commentary about the songs found in the Vermont Historical Society's collection of sheet music. Dressed in period costume, Ms. Radtke takes listeners through state history, using the songs Vermonters published in their communities. Hosted by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Lamoille Valley. Morrisville, River Arts, 74 Pleasant St., 1:30 pm. Millie Marron, (802) 253-9011.

November 5 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Four: "Doers and Shapers." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores progressivism in education and state law from Act 250 to civil unions. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Hartland Public Library. Hartland Public Library, 153 US Route 5, 6:30 pm. Theresa Gregory, (802) 436-2473.

November 5 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Five: "Ceres' Children." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores participatory democracy and ethics in conservation and farming. Led by Kenneth Peck. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin Meeting Room, 200 Wake Robin Dr,  3:30 pm. Krista Malaney, (802) 264-5107.

November 5 — Gothic Magnificence. Dartmouth professor Cecilia Gaposchkin discusses the power of Gothic architecture in thirteenth-century Paris, including the cathedrals of Notre-Dame and Sainte-Chapelle.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Ilsley Public Library. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main St, 7:00 pm. Chris Kirby, (802) 388-4095.

November 5 — Painting in Early Renaissance Florence: Competition and Collaboration. Middlebury College professor Katy Smith Abbott explores how competition led to great artistic achievements in fifteenth-century Florence while a network of collaboration characterized painters’ daily experience. A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Mark Skinner Library. Manchester, First Congregational Church, 7:00 pm. Cindy Waters, (802) 362-2607.

November 5 — The Buildings of Vermont. Middlebury College professor Glenn Andres looks beyond Vermont’s pastoral stereotypes to examine the remarkable range, quality, humanity, and persistence of its built landscape.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 1171 Main St, 7:00 pm. Robert Joly, (802) 748-8291.

November 5 — The Marshall Plan Revisited. Mark A. Stoler, editor of George Marshall’s papers and UVM professor emeritus, examines the Marshall Plan of the late 1940s and early 1950s, considered one of the most successful programs in the history of American foreign relations.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Essex Junction, Brownell Library, 6 Lincoln St, 7:00 pm. Wendy Hysko, (802) 878-6954.

November 5 — Amelia. The mysteries surrounding the 1937 disappearance of aviation legend Amelia Earhart often overshadow her accomplishments as a pilot and author. Champlain College professor Nancy Nahra explores the life of a woman who lived as if she were invincible but understood she was anything but.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Goodrich Memorial Library. Newport, Goodrich Memorial Library, 202 Main St, 7:00 pm. Carol Nicholson, (802) 334-7902.

November 5 — Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring and the Music of 1911. Igor Stravinsky’s ballet The Rite of Spring is widely considered the most influential composition of the twentieth century. In this lecture-demonstration, pianist Michael Arnowitt examines this landmark work, and other pieces written in 1911 by Ravel, Schoenberg, Bartok, and Rachmaninov.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Rutland Free Library. Rutland Free Library, 10 Court St, 7:00 pm. Randal Smathers, (802) 773-1860.

November 5 — Pablo Picasso and Gertrude Stein: The Making of Modernism. How did these two great creative visionaries of Modernism come into their own? Dartmouth professor Barbara Will examines their early friendship and mutual artistic influences.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Montpelier, Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main St, 7:00 pm. Rachel Senechal, (802) 223-3338.

November 5 — The Morally Injured. In light of his experiences fighting in Iraq, Tyler Boudreau, author of Packing Inferno: The Unmaking of a Marine, reflects on PTSD and “moral injury.”A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St, 7:00 pm. Jerry Carbone, (802) 254-5290.

November 5 — Why Radio? Longtime NPR broadcast journalist Susan Stamberg celebrates the power of radio in a high-tech world, sharing stories from the early days of NPR and more recent radio days, and reflecting on why radio has endured.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

November 6 — Staged Reading of Wonder. A Vermont Reads Event. Students from various area schools will perform a staged reading of the novel by R.J. Palacio. Hosted by the Stratton Mountain School. Stratton Mountain School, Patty Kalstas Performing Arts Center,  7 World Cup Cir, 7:00 pm. Mary Mangiacotti, (973) 903-4836.

November 6 — Steve Paxton Pre- Performance Discussion. Grant Event. Pre-performance discussion with Stowe-based choreographer Polly Motley and dancer Steve Paxton. Hosted by the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts. Burlington, Amy E. Tarrant Gallery at the Flynn, 153 Main St, 6:00 pm. Leigh Chandler, (802) 652-4500.

November 6 — Jurij Konjar/Steve Paxton. Grant Event. Postmodern pioneer Steve Paxton transformed dance vocabulary through improvisational work with Judson Dance Theatre and Grand Union. In this performance of Paxton’s 1983 work, Bound, Slovenian dancer Jurij Konjar performs the solo dance piece as taught to him by the choreographer. With formal training in Judo, Konjar is an ideal performer for Paxton’s work inspired by the concepts of gravity and momentum. Hosted by the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts. Fee for performance, tickets at flynntix.org. Burlington, FlynnSpace, 153 Main St, 7:30 pm. Leigh Chandler, (802) 652-4500.

November 7 — Staged Reading of Wonder. A Vermont Reads Event. Members of the Dorset Players in conjunction with students from several area schools will perform a staged reading of R.J. Palacio's novel. There will be a brief discussion following the reading. Hosted by the Dorset Players, Inc. Dorset Playhouse, 104 Cheney Rd, 7:00 pm. Maureen Chaffee, (802) 867-5570.

November 8 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Five: "Ceres' Children." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores participatory democracy and ethics in conservation and farming. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Pettee Memorial Library. Wilmington, Memorial Hall, 14 W Main St, 7:00 pm. Allison Smith, (802) 464-8557.

November 9 — Book Discussion: Reading the Mountains of Home by John Elder. Part of the The New England Character series. These works by New England authors examine the personality and values of the region. Led by Rachael Cohen. Hosted by the Dailey Memorial Library. Derby, Dailey Memorial Library, 101 Junior High Dr, 1:30 pm. Barbara Whitehill, (802) 766-5063.

November 10 — Book Discussion: La Tour Dreams of the Wolf Girl by David Huddle. Part of the Portraits of the Artists series. These books feature fictional interpretations of famous artists. What happens when the visual arts and the literary arts meet? How do fiction writers interpret the lives of famous painters, and the canvases they leave behind? Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Fletcher Free Library. Burlington, Heineberg Senior Center, 14 Heineberg Rd, 1:00 pm. Barbara Shatara, (802) 865-7211 or Pam Slattery, (802) 863-3982.

November 11 — Book Discussion: Minaret by Leila Aboulela. Part of the Literary Reflections on Islam series. Islam has long provided a source of inspiration through which Muslims experience, understand, and guide their everyday lives. This series, developed jointly by the American Library Association and the NEH, offers literary reflections on Muslim piety and communal concepts such as ethics, governance, knowledge, and identity, and reveals transformations in faith and identity, as Muslims living at different times and in different places have interpreted Islam. Led by Suzanne H Brown. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Mary McKenna, (802) 296 -2191.

November 12 — Book Discussion: The Berlin Stories by Christopher Isherwood. Grant Event. Led by Jeff Tolbert. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073 or lynne@kimballlibrary.org.

November 12 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Six: "People's Power." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores contemporary tensions over energy, independence, climate, and the state's future. Led by Dorothy Tod. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin Meeting Room, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 3:30 pm. Krista Malaney, (802) 264-5107.

November 13 — Inventive Vermonters: A Sampling of Farm Tools and Implements. Vermonters have always been inventive, especially when it comes to agricultural innovations. Time- and laborsaving inventions that ease the hard work of farming have always been important in our rural, agricultural state. In this illustrated lecture, retired engineer Paul Wood presents a sampling of farm tools, implements, and artifacts invented or produced in Vermont, examining their use, uniqueness of design, and the often fascinating stories of the inventors themselves. Hosted by the Starksboro Historical Society. Starksboro, Starksboro Public Library, 2827 Route 116, 7:00 pm. Robert Stokes, (802) 453-3068.

November 13 — How to Read the Landscape. Grant Event. This session will illustrate for participants the cultural landscape features, architectural styles, and signs of both natural and cultural agricultural activity that can be found in Norwich. We will use the VT Division for Historic Preservation’s barn census as part of this presentation. Participants will receive a checklist of features to find on their own land, in essence taking an agricultural census of their property. Led by Alan Berolzheimer and Nancy Osgood. Cost: $10 for all three workshops or $5 per workshop. Space is limited and reservations are recommended. Hosted by the Norwich Historical Society. Norwich Historical Society, 277 Main St, 7:00 pm. Norwich Historical Society, (802) 649-0124 or info@norwichhistory.org.

November 14–15 — VHC 2014 Fall Conference: A Fire Never Extinguished: How the Civil War Continues to Shape Civic and Cultural Life in America. Many of the issues associated with the Civil War resonate today—in Vermont and throughout the nation. VHC’s fall conference (five months before the end of the sesquicentennial of the Civil War) will examine the influence that the War has had and continues to have, and will seek to identify lessons vital to American democracy that still can be learned from the War and its aftermath as we continue to build “a more perfect union” in the twenty-first century. Presented in collaboration with the Vermont Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission and the National Park Service. More details. Burlington, University of Vermont, Dudley H. Davis Center. Max Matthews, (802) 262-2626 x304.

November 15 — An Unofficial Guide to Audience Watching Performance. Grant Event. Philadelphia-based dancer and choreographer Raphael Xavier combines breakdancing and spoken word to create this evening-length autobiographical work. Based on 30 years of experience in hip-hop dance, The Unofficial Guide to Audience Watching Performance sets street dance choreography to a conversational monologue that “captivates with the impassioned lyrical delivery of a hip-hop artist” (Philadelphia Inquirer). By deconstructing Xavier’s lyrics and breakdancing technique, this group ensemble performance takes audiences on an artistic journey defined by sacrifice, passion, and transcendence. Hosted by the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts. Fee for performance, tickets at flynntix.org. Burlington, FlynnSpace, 153 Main St, 8:00 pm. Leigh Chandler, (802) 652-4500.

November 15 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Three: "Refuge, Reinvention, and Revolution." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores innovation, interstates, and counter-culture. Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Varnum Memorial Library. Jeffersonville, Varnum Memorial Library, 194 Main St, 3:00 pm. Laurie Baron, (802) 644-5669.

November 15 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Six: "People's Power." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores contemporary tensions over energy, independence, climate, and the state's future. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Pettee Memorial Library. Wilmington, Memorial Hall, 14 W Main St, 7:00 pm. Allison Smith, (802) 464-8557.

November 16 — Film Screening and Discussion: Cabaret. Grant Event. A nightclub entertainer in 1931 Berlin romances two men while the Nazi Party rises to power around them. Director Bob Fosse and stars Liza Minelli and Joel Grey earned Oscars for this dark 1972 musical, based on the Christopher Isherwood novel The Berlin Stories and the John Van Druten play, I Am a Camera. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Tickets $9; discounts for Chandler Film Society members and students. Anyone who cannot afford the price of admission can request a discount at the box office. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 N Main St, 6:00 pm. Emily Crosby, (802) 431-0204 or emily@chandler-arts.org.

November 17 —Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Two: "Under the Surface." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores labor wars, eugenics, the McCarthy era, and progressive Republicanism. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Mount Tabor/Danby Historical Society. Danby, Mount Tabor/Danby Historical Society, 74 S Main St, 7:00 pm. Lauren Dever, (802) 293 -2265.

November 19 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Five: "Ceres' Children." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores participatory democracy and ethics in conservation and farming. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Hartland Public Library. Hartland Public Library, 153 US Route 5, 6:30 pm. Theresa Gregory, (802) 436-2473.

November 21 — Martha Graham Dance Company Pre-Performance Discussion. Grant Event. Pre-performance conversation with Janet Elber, artistic director of the Martha Graham Dance Company, and Flynn Executive Director John Killacky. Hosted by the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts. Burlington, Amy E. Tarrant Gallery at the Flynn, 153 Main St, 6:30 pm. Leigh Chandler, (802) 652-4500.

November 21 — Martha Graham Dance Company. Grant Event. Martha Graham’s influence on modern dance has been compared to Picasso’s influence on art or Stravinsky’s on music. Graham revolutionized dance, lighting, stage designing, costuming, and music; today, her company is one of the most revered modern dance troupes in the world, called “one of the seven wonders of the artistic universe” by the Los Angeles Times. For this performance, the company performs a new piece by Andonis Foniadakis titled Echo, Diversion of Angels (1948), Errand into the Maze (1947), and an 85th anniversary recital of Graham’s famous solo work, Lamentation Variations. Graham’s choreography remains “a true, living American document” (New York Times). Hosted by the Flynn Center for the Performing Arts. Fee for performance, tickets at flynntix.org. Burlington, Flynn MainStage, 153 Main St, 8:00 pm. Leigh Chandler, (802) 652-4500.

November 30 — Book Discussion: Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton. Part of the The New England Character series. These works by New England authors examine the personality and values of the region. Led by Rachael Cohen. Hosted by the Dailey Memorial Library. Derby, Dailey Memorial Library, 101 Junior High Dr, 1:30 pm. Barbara Whitehill, (802) 766-5063.

December

December 3 — Book Discussion: Berlin Stories by Christopher Isherwood. Part of the From Page to Screen series. When is it true that the movie's good, but the book is better? What makes it so? What does a book or the script of a play have to offer that its film version does not? Conversely, what does film offer that print cannot? Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7076.

December 3 — Book Discussion: Black Narcissus by Rumer Godden. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073 or lynne@kimballlibrary.org.

December 3 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Six: "People's Power." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores contemporary tensions over energy, independence, climate, and the state's future. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Hartland Public Library. Hartland Public Library, 153 Route 5, 6:30 pm. Theresa Gregory, (802) 436-2473.

December 3 — Daily Life in Prewar Nazi Germany. Focusing on the prewar experience of non-Jewish citizens, Keene State professor Paul Vincent examines how ideology and terror undermined human dignity, numbed selfawareness, and atomized German society.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Ilsley Public Library. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main St, 7:00 pm. Chris Kirby, (802) 388-4095.

December 3 — Beethoven’s Deafness: Psychological Crisis and Artistic Triumph. This performance lecture by renowned concert pianist and psychiatrist Richard Kogan explores the power of music to help heal artist and audience alike, and considers the influence of psychological factors on Beethoven’s creative output.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Mark Skinner Library. Manchester, First Congregational Church, 7:00 pm. Cindy Waters, (802) 362-2607.

December 3 — Walking with the Great Apes. Three intrepid women—Jane Goodall, Dian Fossey, and Birute Galdikas—changed the way people understand animals’ lives. Bestselling author Sy Montgomery presents images from her travels to Gombe, Rwanda, and Borneo while researching her triple biography of this remarkable scientific sisterhood.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 1171 Main St, 7:00 pm. Robert Joly, (802) 748-8291.

December 3 — Presidential Term Limits: The History of a Bad Idea. UVM professor emeritus Frank Bryan argues that America’s adoption of presidential term limits not only weakened the Presidency, but also perhaps the Republic itself.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Essex Junction, Brownell Library, 6 Lincoln St, 7:00 pm. Wendy Hysko, (802) 878-6954.

December 3 — The Soldier’s Pen: Letters from the Civil War Battlefront. Dartmouth History professor Robert Bonner considers what we can learn from the numerous firsthand accounts written by Union and Confederate soldiers.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Goodrich Memorial Library. Newport, Goodrich Memorial Library, 202 Main St, 7:00 pm. Carol Nicholson, (802) 334-7902.

December 3 — Jesus: The Human Face of God. Author and Middlebury College professor Jay Parini considers Jesus, a figure who has dominated our collective imagination and cultural iconography for twenty centuries.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Rutland Free Library. Rutland Free Library, 10 Court St, 7:00 pm. Randal Smathers, (802) 773-1860.

December 3 — Becoming American: An Inaugural Poet's Journey. Poet Richard Blanco read at President Obama’s second inauguration, the first Latino, immigrant, and gay writer to have such an honor—and the youngest. Blanco examines cultural identity and the essence of place and belonging.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Montpelier, Unitarian Church, 130 Main St, 7:00 pm. Rachel Senechal, (802) 223-3338.

December 3 — The Costumes of Downton Abbey. Middlebury College artist-in-residence Jule Emerson discusses the fashions worn by Lady Mary and her family in the popular PBS series Downton Abbey.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St, 7:00 pm. Jerry Carbone, (802) 254-5290.

December 3 — What the Buddhists Teach: Finding Clarity in Everyday Life. How do we develop not only mindfulness, but a compassionate optimism about a highly imperfect world? Author Dr. Polly Young-Eisendrath discusses the Buddhist model for remaining fully engaged in the ups and downs of everyday life, a model that differs dramatically from traditional Western perspectives.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

December 4 — Lifelong Learning Music Series: Tomas Luis de Victoria. Grant Event. Victoria, the most famous Spanish composer of the late Renaissance period, studied music in Rome, possibly with Palestrina. He devoted himself exclusively to sacred vocal music yet was influenced by secular madrigalists such as Marenzio. Part of the Lifelong Learning Music Series, a great opportunity to increase your musical knowledge in a relaxed and fun environment. Led by Lois Price, a flutist who teaches music appreciation at Champlain College. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 7:00 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7080.

December 7 — Film Screening and Discussion: Black Narcissus. Grant Event. Based on Rumer Godden's novel, this controversial 1947 film, set in a convent in the Himalayas, features Deborah Kerr, Kathleen Byron, Jean Simmons as women facing conflict, passion and tension in exotic surroundings. The team of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger produced one of the most stunning Technicolor films of the 1940s. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Tickets $9; discounts for Chandler Film Society members and students. Anyone who cannot afford the price of admission can request a discount at the box office. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 N Main St, 6:00 pm. Emily Crosby, (802) 431-0204 or emily@chandler-arts. org.

December 8 — Book Discussion: Frida by Barbara Mujica. Part of the Portraits of the Artists series. These books feature fictional interpretations of famous artists. What happens when the visual arts and the literary arts meet? How do fiction writers interpret the lives of famous painters, and the canvases they leave behind? Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Fletcher Free Library. Burlington, Heineberg Senior Center, 14 Heineberg Rd, 1:00 pm. Barbara Shatara, (802) 865-7211 or Pam Slattery, (802) 863-3982.

December 8 — Book Discussion: The Cliff Walk: A Memoir of a Job Lost and a Life Found by Don Snyder. Part of the Blue Collar America series. Who is the working class? Look past the stereotypes to examine the realities of minimum-wage existence, small-town economics, social divisions, and what does or doesn't constitute the good life. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Wake Robin Retirement Community. Shelburne, Wake Robin, 200 Wake Robin Dr, 7:30 pm. Advance Signup Required, Natalie Albers, (802) 985-0659.

December 15 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Three: "Refuge, Reinvention, and Revolution." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores innovation, interstates, and counter-culture. Led by Tom Fels. Hosted by the Mount Tabor/Danby Historical Society. Danby, Mount Tabor/Danby Historical Society, 74 S Main St, 7:00 pm. Lauren Dever, (802) 293 -2265.

January 2015

January 3 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Four: "Doers and Shapers." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores progressivism in education and state law from Act 250 to civil unions. Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Varnum Memorial Library. Jeffersonville, Varnum Memorial Library, 194 Main St, 3:00 pm. Laurie Baron, (802) 644-5669.

January 7 — The History of Herbal Medicine in America. Expert herbalist Rosemary Gladstar examines the early history of herbalism in America and how herbs play a role in healthcare today.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Ilsley Public Library. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main St, 7:00 pm. Chris Kirby, (802) 388-4095.

January 7 — Building Monticello. Thomas Jefferson never knew the Monticello we visit today — in perfect condition, impeccably furnished. Jefferson died so deeply in debt that the house and contents had to be auctioned off. Dartmouth College senior lecturer Marlene Heck explains the lifelong project Jefferson called his “essay in architecture.”A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Mark Skinner Library. Manchester, First Congregational Church, 7:00 pm. Cindy Waters, (802) 362-2607.

January 7 — The White Mountain Huts. Dartmouth professor Allen Koop explains the Appalachian Mountain Club’s hut system in New Hampshire, and how the huts and their people have formed a society with its own history, traditions, and legends.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 1171 Main St, 7:00 pm. Robert Joly, (802) 748-8291.

January 7 — The Examined Life. Socrates famously proclaimed, “The unexamined life is not worth living.” Philosophy scholar Susanne Claxton explores what constitutes the examined life and how we may best pursue it.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Goodrich Memorial Library. Newport, Goodrich Memorial Library, 202 Main St, 7:00 pm. Carol Nicholson, (802) 334-7902.

January 7 — Rowing Against Wind and Tide: The Journals and Letters of Anne Morrow Lindbergh. Author Reeve Lindbergh discusses collecting four decades of her mother’s previously unpublished diaries and letters— shedding light on her mother’s marriage to Charles Lindbergh and her take on world events.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Rutland Free Library. Rutland Free Library, 10 Court St, 7:00 pm. Randal Smathers, (802) 773-1860.

January 7 — On Thin Ice: Climate Change in the Cryosphere. Pam Pearson, director of the International Cryosphere Climate Initiative, considers changes in the globe’s regions of ice and snow—and whether we can and will act in time to halt these changes.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Montpelier, Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main St, 7:00 pm. Rachel Senechal, (802) 223-3338.

January 7 — Delicious to the Ear: The Inspiring Voice of Maya Angelou. Before she became an internationally revered poet, memoirist, and activist, Maya Angelou was mute for five years as a child. UVM professor Emily Bernard explains how poetry awakened Angelou’s voice, a voice that transformed a history of trauma into inspiration and beauty.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St, 7:00 pm. Jerry Carbone, (802) 254-5290.

January 7 — Georgia O'Keeffe: A Critical Look. Georgia O'Keeffe lived 99 years and produced more than 2,000 works in her 75- year career. James Maroney, the former head of American Paintings at both Sotheby's and Christie's in New York who appraised her estate after her death, presents a critical evaluation of her best work.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

January 12 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Four: "Doers and Shapers." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores progressivism in education and state law from Act 250 to civil unions. Led by Tom Fels. Hosted by the Mount Tabor/Danby Historical Society. Danby, Mount Tabor/Danby Historical Society, 74 S Main St, 7:00 pm. Lauren Dever, (802) 293-2265.

January 14 — Book Discussion: The Horse's Mouth by Joyce Cary. Grant Event. Led by Jim Schley. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073 or lynne@kimballlibrary.org.

January 14 — What’s the Use of Stories That Aren’t Even True? Salman Rushdie, author of VHC's 2015 Vermont Reads Book, Haroun and the Sea of Stories, talks about the importance of storytelling. A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Burlington, Ira Allen Chapel, 26 University Ter, 5:00 pm. Max Matthews, (802) 262-1355.

January 15 — Lifelong Learning Music Series: Francesco Maria Veracini. Grant Event. Veracini came from a family of violinists in Florence. His 18th-century career took him to Dresden and London as violinist, conductor and composer. His playing was virtuosic, but his arrogant personality and eccentric behavior often got him into trouble. Part of the Lifelong Learning Music Series, a great opportunity to increase your musical knowledge in a relaxed and fun environment. Led by Lois Price, a flutist who teaches music appreciation at Champlain College. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 7:00 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7080.

January 18 — Film Screening and Discussion: The Horse's Mouth. Grant Event. Joyce Cary's novel is the source of this droll, iconic 1958 comedy starring Alec Guinness in the greatest role of his career: the eccentric London painter and visionary Gulley Jimson, surrounded by an array of colorful characters. Guinness also wrote the screenplay and Ronald Neame directed. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Tickets $9; discounts for Chandler Film Society members and students. Anyone who cannot afford the price of admission can request a discount at the box office. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 N Main St, 6:00 pm. Emily Crosby, (802) 431-0204 or emily@chandler-arts.org.

January 24 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Five: "Ceres' Children." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores participatory democracy and ethics in conservation and farming. Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Varnum Memorial Library. Jeffersonville, Varnum Memorial Library, 194 Main St, 3:00 pm. Laurie Baron, (802) 644-5669.

February 2015

February 4 — Book Discussion: Out of Africa by Isak Dinesen. Part of the From Page to Screen series. When is it true that the movie's good, but the book is better? What makes it so? What does a book or the script of a play have to offer that its film version does not? Conversely, what does film offer that print cannot? Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7076.

February 4 — The Hungry Heart. Filmmaker Bess O’Brien discusses and shows excerpts from her film The Hungry Heart, which provides an intimate look at the often hidden world of prescription drug addiction in Vermont.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Ilsley Public Library. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main St, 7:00 pm. Chris Kirby, (802) 388-4095.

February 4 — Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln. Douglass and Lincoln — one born a slave, the other born dirt poor — became respectively one of the nation’s greatest orators and one of its greatest presidents. Harvard professor John Stauffer examines their friendship, the similarities in their lives, and their legacies.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Mark Skinner Library. Manchester, First Congregational Church, 7:00 pm. Cindy Waters, (802) 362-2607.

February 4 — The Shia-Sunni Divide in Islam. Former Iranian Ambassador to the UN Mansour Farhang examines the origin and contemporary revival of this 1300-year-long divide and explores how contemporary challenges facing states and societies in the Middle East exacerbate the animosity.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 1171 Main St, 7:00 pm. Robert Joly, (802) 748-8291.

February 4 — Delicious to the Ear: The Inspiring Voice of Maya Angelou. Before she was a revered poet, memoirist, and activist, Maya Angelou was mute for five years as a child. UVM professor Emily Bernard explains how poetry awakened Angelou’s voice, which transformed a history of trauma into inspiration and beauty.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Essex Junction, Brownell Library, 6 Lincoln St, 7:00 pm. Wendy Hysko, (802) 878-6954.

February 4 — An Evening with E.B. White. From his exquisite essays in The New Yorker to the beloved children’s classic Charlotte's Web, E.B. White remains the master's master of elegant prose, sophisticated wit, and graceful irreverence. Drawing from his stories, essays, poems, and letters, Dartmouth professor Nancy Jay Crumbine celebrates White's versatility and enormous legacy.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Goodrich Memorial Library. Newport, Goodrich Memorial Library, 202 Main St, 7:00 pm. Carol Nicholson, (802) 334-7902.

February 4 — Knight to Queen. Chess, Courtly Life, and the Game of Love in the Middle Ages. Imported from the Arabs and Persians in the ninth century, chess became a status symbol, an allegory of battle, and a metaphor for love. Dartmouth professor Jane Carroll examines the game of kings.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Rutland Free Library. Rutland Free Library, 10 Court St, 7:00 pm. Randal Smathers, (802) 773-1860.

February 4 — Plato's Republic: Rethinking His Utopian Ideal. Philosophy scholar Suzanne Claxton explores the key elements of the utopian republic envisioned by Plato and considers their adequacy.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St, 7:00 pm. Jerry Carbone, (802) 254-5290.

February 4 — Victoria’s Secrets. Middlebury College professor Antonia Losano explains how the Victorian era, the age of staid decorum, also had its guilty pleasures: mysteries, ghost stories, science fiction, imperialist adventure tales, and radical fantasies of gender confusion.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

February 7 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Six: "People's Power." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores contemporary tensions over energy, independence, climate, and the state's future. Led by Linda Bland. Hosted by the Varnum Memorial Library. Jeffersonville, Varnum Memorial Library, 194 Main St, 3:00 pm. Laurie Baron, (802) 644-5669.

February 9 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Five: "Ceres' Children." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores participatory democracy and ethics in conservation and farming. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Mount Tabor/Danby Historical Society. Danby, Mount Tabor/Danby Historical Society, 74 S Main St, 7:00 pm. Lauren Dever, (802) 293-2265.

February 11 — An Evening with Sojourner Truth. In this living history portrayal, Kathryn Woods uses spiritual music and Truth’s own words to recreate the remarkable life of the famous abolitionist, feminist, and escaped slave.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Montpelier, Vermont State House, 115 State Street, 7:30 pm. Rachel Senechal, (802) 223-3338.

February 11 — Book Discussion: Paper Fish by Tina de Rosa. Part of the Gastronomy: Novels about Food and Culture series. One of the most tantalizing ways to learn about a culture is through its food. These mouth-watering novels highlight how what we eat is closely aligned with who we are. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Walden Community Library. West Danville, Walden Community Library, 135 Cahoon Farm Rd, 7:00 pm. Anne Smith, (802) 563-2630.

February 11 — Book Discussion: The Turn of the Screw by Henry James. Grant Event. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073 or lynne@kimballlibrary.org.

February 15 — Film Screening and Discussion: The Innocents. Grant Event. Deborah Kerr plays a young governess for two children who becomes convinced that their house is haunted. This 1961 gothic horror film, revered as one of the cinema’s great ghost stories, is based on the Henry James novella, The Turn of the Screw. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Tickets $9; discounts for Chandler Film Society members and students. Anyone who cannot afford the price of admission can request a discount at the box office. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 N Main St, 6:00 pm. Emily Crosby, (802) 431-0204 or emily@chandler-arts. org.

February 19 — Lifelong Learning Music Series: Giuseppe Verdi. Grant Event. Verdi came from a small Italian village to become his country’s most revered composer as well as a national hero. His long life spanning most of the 19th century resulted in 28 operas of which many, such as Tosca, Rigoletto, Otello and Aida, are staples of opera houses worldwide. Part of the Lifelong Learning Music Series, a great opportunity to increase your musical knowledge in a relaxed and fun environment. Led by Lois Price, a flutist who teaches music appreciation at Champlain College. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 7:00 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7080.

March 2015

March 4 — Book Discussion: Shoeless Joe by W. P. Kinsella. Part of the From Page to Screen series. When is it true that the movie's good, but the book is better? What makes it so? What does a book or the script of a play have to offer that its film version does not? Conversely, what does film offer that print cannot? Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7076.

March 4 — You Are Not Special . . . and Other Encouragements. Expanding on his popular commencement speech, viewed by millions on YouTube, high school English teacher and father of four David McCullough Jr. considers how we raise our kids today, and why passionate engagement—rather than success for its own sake—is critical to a fulfilling, happy life.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Ilsley Public Library. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main St, 7:00 pm. Chris Kirby, (802) 388-4095.

March 4 — The Memoir Boom: Who, What, Why. Dartmouth professor and experimental memoirist Irene Kacandes discusses current approaches to life writing and considers why we continue to love reading about others’ lives.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Mark Skinner Library. Manchester, First Congregational Church, 7:00 pm. Cindy Waters, (802) 362-2607.

March 4 — Merton, Meditation, and More: The Appeal of Buddhism in the West. The Buddhist tradition is now well-established in the United States, among Buddhists and others, such as Catholic monk and author Thomas Merton, who engaged in Buddhism without conversion. Middlebury College religion professor Elizabeth Morrison considers the reasons for this great interest, and what has emerged from the West’s encounter with Buddhism.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 1171 Main St, 7:00 pm. Robert Joly, (802) 748-8291.

March 4 — Making Sport for Our Neighbors. New Yorker cartoonist Ed Koren takes us on a tour of the roots of visual satire leading to the New Yorker cartoon, with an excursion into the archive of his own work.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Essex Junction, Brownell Library, 6 Lincoln St, 7:00 pm. Wendy Hysko, (802) 878-6954.

March 4 — Trains Come to Orleans County. The arrival of trains in Orleans County in the mid-nineteenth century brought great change to the region. Scott Wheeler, publisher of Vermont’s Northland Journal, discusses how rail—and then, in the early twentieth century, automobiles—affected life in the region, particularly in communities such as Newport.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Goodrich Memorial Library. Newport, Goodrich Memorial Library, 202 Main St, 7:00 pm. Carol Nicholson, (802) 334-7902.

March 4 — “India Rising.” With its sweeping victory in the 2014 elections, India’s right-wing Hindu Bharatiya Janata Party is promising to revitalize the economy. But critics warn that the BJP has often advanced its policies through authoritarianism and religious violence. UVM history professor Abby McGowan considers the challenges and opportunities facing the new government.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Rutland Free Library. Rutland Free Library, 10 Court St, 7:00 pm. Randal Smathers, (802) 773-1860.

March 4 — Dealing with Foreign Terrorism. Former CIA Chief of Counterterrorism Haviland Smith examines the history of foreign terrorism directed against US interests, our policy for dealing with it, and how we might do better.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Montpelier, Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main St, 7:00 pm. Rachel Senechal, (802) 223-3338.

March 4 — Photography as Fine Art: Alfred Stieglitz and Camera Work. Photographer, gallerist, and magazine editor Alfred Stieglitz was a seminal figure in the history of twentieth-century photography. Middlebury College professor Kirsten Hoving examines Stieglitz's work and his advocacy for photography as a fine art, with special attention to his quarterly journal Camera Work. A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St, 7:00 pm. Jerry Carbone, (802) 254-5290.

March 4 — What If Poor Women Ran the World? Labor historian Annelise Orleck tells the story of nine African-American union maids in Las Vegas during the 1970s who challenged welfare cuts and built a long-lasting, vibrant antipoverty program run by poor mothers.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

March 9 — Film Discussion: Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie: Part Six: "People's Power." Part of the Freedom and Unity: The Vermont Movie series. This six-part collaborative documentary produced by several dozen Vermont-based filmmakers uses personal stories, rare footage, compelling interviews, and original reenactments to explore the history and contemporary culture of the Green Mountain State and tell how one small state has made a very big difference. This part explores contemporary tensions over energy, independence, climate, and the state's future. Led by Nora Jacobson. Hosted by the Mount Tabor/Danby Historical Society. Danby, Mount Tabor/Danby Historical Society, 74 S Main St, 7:00 pm. Lauren Dever, (802) 293-2265.

March 11 — Book Discussion: Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare. Grant Event. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073 or lynne@kimballlibrary.org.

March 11 — Book Discussion: Crescent by Diana Abu-Jaber. Part of the Gastronomy: Novels about Food and Culture series. One of the most tantalizing ways to learn about a culture is through its food. These mouth-watering novels highlight how what we eat is closely aligned with who we are. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Walden Community Library. West Danville, Walden Community Library, 135 Cahoon Farm Rd, 7:00 pm. Anne Smith, (802) 563-2630.

March 15 — Film Screening and Discussion: Much Ado About Nothing. Grant Event. Shakespeare's witty and fast-paced romantic comedy is brought to life in this exuberant 1993 film version directed by Kenneth Branagh, set in the sunny Italian countryside, and starring Branagh as Benedick, Emma Thompson as Beatrice, and featuring a superb cast. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Tickets $9; discounts for Chandler Film Society members and students. Anyone who cannot afford the price of admission can request a discount at the box office. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 N Main St, 6:00 pm. Emily Crosby, (802) 431-0204 or emily@chandler-arts.org.

March 19 — Lifelong Learning Music Series: Heitor Villa-Lobos. Grant Event. The music of Villa-Lobos, a 20th century Brazilian composer, combines influences of his native folk music and European classical styles. His unique background and musical imagination make him a stand-out among classical composers. Part of the Lifelong Learning Music Series, a great opportunity to increase your musical knowledge in a relaxed and fun environment. Led by Lois Price, a flutist who teaches music appreciation at Champlain College. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 7:00 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7080.

April 2015

April 1 — Book Discussion: Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption by Stephen King. Part of the From Page to Screen series. When is it true that the movie's good, but the book is better? What makes it so? What does a book or the script of a play have to offer that its film version does not? Conversely, what does film offer that print cannot? Led by Merilyn Burrington. Hosted by the South Burlington Community Library. South Burlington Community Library, 540 Dorset St, 6:30 pm. Contact the library, (802) 652-7076.

April 1 — An Evening with Julia Alvarez. At the outset of National Poetry Month, celebrated author and activist Julia Alvarez speaks and reads from her early and recent work.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Ilsley Public Library. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main St, 7:00 pm. Chris Kirby, (802) 388-4095.

April 1 — A Slight Sound at Evening: Why Thoreau’s Quiet Writing Endures Today. Drawing upon Thoreau’s journals and letters, Dartmouth professor Nancy Jay Crumbine examines the spirituality, inherent and explicit, in his walking and writing life.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Mark Skinner Library. Manchester, First Congregational Church, 7:00 pm. Cindy Waters, (802) 362-2607.

April 1 — Homer’s Odyssey, Narratives of Return for Combat Veterans. Dartmouth Classics professor Roberta Stewart describes her work with veterans and examines what the story of Odysseus’s long journey home from war has to say to combat veterans, and to all of us.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 1171 Main St, 7:00 pm. Robert Joly, (802) 748-8291.

April 1 — The National Security Agency: The Law, the Media, and the Legacy of Edward Snowden. Retired NSA executive Bill Sullivan discusses the NSA’s foreign intelligence mission as well as its process, governance, and oversight, and examines media reports based on material provided by Edward Snowden.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St, 7:00 pm. Jerry Carbone, (802) 254-5290.

April 1 — The Human Face of War: Combat, Healing, and the Humanities. Dr. Edward Tick, director of the Soldier’s Heart Clinic, explores the inner world of combat, the universal dimensions of veterans’ wounding, and a philosophy of healing combat’s consequences—recognizing that while war most directly affects veterans, it wounds us all.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Goodrich Memorial Library. Newport, Goodrich Memorial Library, 202 Main St, 7:00 pm. Carol Nicholson, (802) 334-7902.

April 1 — The Argentine Pope. Pope Francis’s emphasis on the poor and marginalized has energized social justice in the Roman Catholic Church. Author Martin Weinstein, professor emeritus at William Paterson University, examines the foundations of the Pope’s philosophy, the history of the church in Latin America, and the rise of liberation theology.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Rutland Free Library. Rutland Free Library, 10 Court St, 7:00 pm. Randal Smathers, (802) 773-1860.

April 1 — Vermont War Memorials, Statuary, and Cemeteries: from the Revolution to 9/11. In this illustrated talk, Vermont authors Bill Mares and Bill Lipke share Vermont’s commemorative history, from Ethan Allen to the War on Terror Memorial at Camp Johnson in Colchester.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

April 8 — Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater: American Masterpiece. H. Nicholas Muller III, retired executive director of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, shares the story — and controversy — behind the house, widely considered an architectural masterpiece.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Montpelier, Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 135 Main St, 7:00 pm. Rachel Senechal, (802) 223-3338.

April 8 — The Medici Grand Dukes: Art and Politics in Renaissance Florence. UVM professor Kelley DiDio considers how, despite scandals and even murder, the Medici Grand Dukes maintained their power for nearly two centuries by giving gifts of art by the great Florentine masters to kings, popes, and emperors. A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Essex Junction, Brownell Library, 6 Lincoln St, 7:00 pm. Wendy Hysko, (802) 878-6954.

April 8 — Book Discussion: The Mistress of Spices by Chitra Divakaruni. Part of the Gastronomy: Novels about Food and Culture series. One of the most tantalizing ways to learn about a culture is through its food. These mouth-watering novels highlight how what we eat is closely aligned with who we are. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Walden Community Library. West Danville, Walden Community Library, 135 Cahoon Farm Rd, 7:00 pm. Anne Smith, (802) 563-2630.

April 15 — Book Discussion: The Hours by Michael Cunningham. Grant Event. Led by Francette Cerulli. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Kimball Public Library, 67 N Main St, 7:00 pm. Lynne Gately, (802) 728-5073 or lynne@kimballlibrary.org.

April 19 — Film Screening and Discussion: The Hours. Grant Event. This 2002 film, based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Michael Cunningham, tells how the Virgina Woolf novel Mrs. Dalloway affects three women in three generations (played by Nicole Kidman, Meryl Streep and Julianne Moore) having to deal with suicide in their lives. Part of the Literature into Film Series, which will investigate the structure, aesthetics, impact, and history behind eight remarkable movies and the significant literary works that inspired them. Tickets $9; discounts for Chandler Film Society members and students. Anyone who cannot afford the price of admission can request a discount at the box office. Hosted by the Chandler Film Society. Randolph, Chandler Center for the Arts, 71-73 N Main St, 6:00 pm. Emily Crosby, (802) 431-0204 or emily@chandler-arts.org.

May 2015

May 6 — Inventing Ethan Allen. After more than two centuries, Ethan Allen remains the most remembered figure in Vermont’s past. Historian H. Nicholas Muller III considers how the memory of Allen coincides with the reality and why his story was shaped and reshaped after his death.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Ilsley Public Library. Middlebury, Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main St, 7:00 pm. Chris Kirby, (802) 388-4095.

May 6 — Redeemer President: The Significance of Jimmy Carter. Dartmouth professor of American religious history Randall Balmer examines the rise of the Religious Right and Jimmy Carter, a Southern Baptist Sunday school teacher elected president with the support of evangelicals, who turned against him four years later.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Mark Skinner Library. Manchester, First Congregational Church, 7:00 pm. Cindy Waters, (802) 362-2607.

May 6 — Margaret Bourke-White, Courageous Photographer. Actress and educator Sally Matson portrays Margaret Bourke-White, whose influential images of industry, war zones, and world leaders established her as a groundbreaking photographer in the 1930s to 1950s.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the St. Johnsbury Athenaeum. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 1171 Main St, 7:00 pm. Robert Joly, (802) 748-8291.

May 6 — Calvin Coolidge: More Than Two Words. Drawing from Coolidge’s letters, speeches, and autobiography, Jim Cooke brings Coolidge to life and helps us understand why Will Rogers said, “Mr. Coolidge has more subtle humor than almost any public man I ever met.”A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brownell Library. Essex Junction, Brownell Library, 6 Lincoln St, 7:00 pm. Wendy Hysko, (802) 878-6954.

May 6 — Life in the Studio. David Macaulay, award-winning author and illustrator of Castle, Cathedral, and The Way We Work, discusses current projects and current challenges in his work.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Goodrich Memorial Library. Newport, Goodrich Memorial Library, 202 Main St, 7:00 pm. Carol Nicholson, (802) 334-7902.

May 6 — The Buildings of Rutland. Architectural historian Curtis B. Johnson illustrates the richness of Rutland’s architecture. NOTE: on Saturday, May 9, Johnson leads a walking tour of “the Hill” neighborhood, 1:00 pm-2:30 pm. Meet at Rutland Free Library’s main entrance. A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Rutland Free Library. Rutland Free Library, 10 Court St, 7:00 pm. Randal Smathers, (802) 773-1860.

May 6 — A Historian’s Reflections on War. A Vietnam veteran and author of seven military biographies and histories, Norwich University graduate Carlo D’Este reflects on his own experience, the experience of others who have seen war firsthand, and war’s impact on humanity.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Kellogg-Hubbard Library. Montpelier, Kellogg- Hubbard Library, 135 Main St, 7:00 pm. Rachel Senechal, (802) 223-3338.

May 6 — The Duel: Aaron Burr vs. Alexander Hamilton. Was it murder or suicide when the vice president of the United States killed the first secretary of the treasury in a duel? Willard Sterne Randall, award-winning biographer of Hamilton and five other Founding Fathers, tells this fascinating story.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Brooks Memorial Library. Brattleboro, Brooks Memorial Library, 224 Main St, 7:00 pm. Jerry Carbone, (802) 254-5290.

May 6 — All About Eve. Dartmouth professor of religion Susan Ackerman considers both traditional and contemporary interpretations of the Adam and Eve story and how recent scholarship on women and the Bible pushes us to rethink our common assumptions about Eve.A First Wednesdays lecture. Hosted by the Norwich Public Library. Norwich Public Library, 368 Main St, 7:00 pm. Lucinda Walker, (802) 649-1184.

May 13 — Book Discussion: The Last Chinese Chef by Nicole Mones. Part of the Gastronomy: Novels about Food and Culture series. One of the most tantalizing ways to learn about a culture is through its food. These mouth-watering novels highlight how what we eat is closely aligned with who we are. Led by Helene Lang. Hosted by the Walden Community Library. West Danville, Walden Community Library, 135 Cahoon Farm Rd, 7:00 pm. Anne Smith, (802) 563-2630.

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